Civilisations: How Do We Look / The Eye of Faith

As seen on TV

Author: Mary Beard

Publisher: Profile Books

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page:

View: 897

Companion to the major new BBC documentary series CIVILISATIONS, presented by Mary Beard, David Olusoga and Simon Schama The idea of 'civilisation' has always been debated, even fought over. At the heart of those debates lies the big question of how people - from prehistory to the present day - have depicted themselves and others, both human and divine. Distinguished historian Mary Beard explores how art has shaped, and been shaped by, the people who created it. How have we looked at these images? Why have they sometimes been so contentious? In Part One, she examines how the human figure was portrayed in some of the earliest art in the world - from the gigantic stone heads carved by the Olmec of Central America to the statues and pottery of the ancient Greeks to the terracotta army of the first emperor of China. And she explains how one particular version of representing the human body, which goes back to the ancient world, still influences (and sometimes distorts) how people in the West see their own culture and that of others. Throughout this story, she is concerned not only with the artists who made images, but with those who have used them, viewed them and interpreted them. In other words: How Do We Look? In Part Two, Mary Beard turns to the relationship between art and religion. For centuries, religion has inspired art: from the Hindu temple at Angkor Wat to the Christian mosaics of Ravenna to the exquisite calligraphy of Islamic mosques. But making the divine visible in the human world has never been simple. All religions have wrestled with idolatry and iconoclasm, destroying art as well as creating it - and asking how to look with The Eye of Faith.

How Do We Look: The Body, the Divine, and the Question of Civilization

Author: Mary Beard

Publisher: Liveright Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 163

From prehistoric Mexico to modern Istanbul, Mary Beard looks beyond the familiar canon of Western imagery to explore the history of art, religion, and humanity. Conceived as a gorgeously illustrated accompaniment to “How Do We Look” and “The Eye of Faith,” the famed Civilisations shows on PBS, renowned classicist Mary Beard has created this elegant volume on how we have looked at art. Focusing in Part I on the Olmec heads of early Mesoamerica, the colossal statues of the pharaoh Amenhotep III, and the nudes of classical Greece, Beard explores the power, hierarchy, and gender politics of the art of the ancient world, and explains how it came to define the so-called civilized world. In Part II, Beard chronicles some of the most breathtaking religious imagery ever made—whether at Angkor Wat, Ravenna, Venice, or in the art of Jewish and Islamic calligraphers— to show how all religions, ancient and modern, have faced irreconcilable problems in trying to picture the divine. With this classic volume, Beard redefines the Western-and male-centric legacies of Ernst Gombrich and Kenneth Clark.

Civilisations: First Contact / The Cult of Progress

As seen on TV

Author: David Olusoga

Publisher: Profile Books

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 303

View: 845

Companion to the major new BBC documentary series CIVILISATIONS, presented by Mary Beard, David Olusoga and Simon Schama Oscar Wilde said 'Life imitates Art far more than Art imitates Life.' Was he right? In Civilisations, David Olusoga travels the world to piece together the shared histories that link nations. In Part One, First Contact, we discover what happened to art in the great Age of Discovery, when civilisations encountered each other for the first time. Although undoubtedly a period of conquest and destruction, it was also one of mutual curiosity, global trade and the exchange of ideas. In Part Two, The Cult of Progress, we see how the Industrial Revolution transformed the world, impacting every corner, and every civilisation, from the cotton mills of the Midlands through Napoleon's conquest of Egypt to the decimation of both Native American and Maori populations and the advent of photography in Paris in 1839. Incredible art - both looted and created - relays the key events and their outcomes throughout the world.

Women & Power

A Manifesto

Author: Mary Beard

Publisher: Profile Books

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 74

View: 728

An updated edition of the Sunday Times Bestseller Britain's best-known classicist Mary Beard, is also a committed and vocal feminist. With wry wit, she revisits the gender agenda and shows how history has treated powerful women. Her examples range from the classical world to the modern day, from Medusa and Athena to Theresa May and Hillary Clinton. Beard explores the cultural underpinnings of misogyny, considering the public voice of women, our cultural assumptions about women's relationship with power, and how powerful women resist being packaged into a male template. A year on since the advent of #metoo, Beard looks at how the discussions have moved on during this time, and how that intersects with issues of rape and consent, and the stories men tell themselves to support their actions. In trademark Beardian style, using examples ancient and modern, Beard argues, 'it's time for change - and now!' From the author of international bestseller SPQR: A History of Ancient Rome.

Contemplating Marriage

Reader

Author: Gloria Blanchfield Thomas

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 413

View: 137

This anthology covers key areas of concern in any contemporary consideration of marriage. Chapters include: The Influence of Parents on Our Adult Choice; Our Expectations of Marriage; Church Tradition; Love, Intimacy, and Sexual Intimacy; The Meaning of Sacramental Marriage; and more.

European Civilisation

Protestantism and Catholicity Compared

Author: Jaime Luciano Balmes

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Europe

Page: 505

View: 380

Seeing Through the Eye

Malcolm Muggeridge on Faith

Author: Malcolm Muggeridge

Publisher: Ignatius Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 241

View: 780

Malcolm Muggeridge was one of Great Britain's most well-known journalists and television personalities, having interviewed practically every major public figure of his time. He shocked the world with his conversion to Christianity later in life. "St. Mugg", as he was affectionately known, was clear in his new-found faith: "It is the truth that has died, not God," and "Jesus was God or he was nothing." These wonderful selections of Muggeridge's writings and speeches cover a wide variety of spiritual themes, revealing his profound faith, great wit, and lively writing style. Topics include "Jesus: The Man Who Lives", "Is There a God?", "The Prospect of Death", "Do We Need Religion?", "Peace and Power", and many more.

The Soul of a Nation

Culture, Morality, Law, Education, Faith

Author: Bernard J. Coughlin

Publisher: Hamilton Books

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 239

The Soul of a Nation is a series of essays on American society’s culture, morality, law, education, and faith: subjects that confront our society and will be of interest to citizens and scholars who have studied its political drift in recent years.

The Empire in Solution

With Chapters on Anglo-Saxon Civilization, Russia, and Palestine and who Should Possess it

Author: William Pascoe Goard

Publisher: London, Covenant

ISBN:

Category: Anglo-Israelism

Page: 181

View: 707

Bulletin

Author: Sri Aurobindo International Centre of Education (Pondicherry, India)

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Yoga

Page:

View: 236

The Forest Farm

Tales of the Austrian Tyrol

Author: Peter Rosegger

Publisher: WILLIAM BRENDON AND SON, LTD. PRINTERS

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 106

View: 947

Example in this ebook Rosegger: An Appreciation The unmistakable trend of our time is the civilisation—which, in its modern form, is largely urbanisation—of the whole habitable globe. From its centres outwards it is thrusting itself upon places, men, processes—ultimate sanctuaries, never before reached by alien trespassing. Most men are looking on at its destruction of the old order with shrugging acceptance of the inevitable, or hailing the chaotic stuff of the new in its making with so far unjustified joy. With a wit worn somewhat threadbare with use they invariably counsel the few eccentrics who deny its inevitability and question its beneficence to quit the hopes and mops of Mrs. Partington for the discreet submission of the wiser Canute. Then they grow properly grave, and declare that this modern civilisation, for all its shortcomings, has been well described as a banquet, the like of which, for those below as for those above the salt, has never been spread before. However that may be, there is no question that here and there a guest is sometimes moved to look round on the company and scan its several types with a sudden sense of their significance. Some of these, good and bad, are common to all late civilisations, he perceives, others as hatefully peculiar to our own as certain diseases. Where, in God's name, were there ever till now men like these, who bend a complaisant spectacled gaze on a world going under, content if they may but first secure their museum sample (including one carefully chosen, perfectly embalmed, stuffed and catalogued peasant) of every species? Or their younger kindred—men whose intellect obeys no inspiration save curiosity nor law save its own limit, whose inventions, therefore, cannot foster good and beauty but only spoil these in Nature and men's souls? As for that splendid group beyond, one may question if Athens, Rome, or Byzantium, whose sumptuous culture of brain and body achieved an almost criminal comeliness by Christian standards, ever equalled them: question, too, whether their selfish perfection or the travesty of it in this mob of women dull with luxury, of men brutalised by the scramble of getting it for them—be less desirable for the race! Thankfully his eye passes from them to those who turn such a cold shoulder upon their vulgarity: a little company, fine-edged, polished and flexible with perpetual fence of wit and word, hardly peculiar to our day perhaps, but rather such as might have played their irresponsible game on the eve of any red revolution. Now and again they lend an amused ear to various gassy gospels over the way, where, as he perceives, he is once more among the children of this latter day alone: notably certain insignificances who, because they have raised their self-indulgence to the dignity of a problem play, are solemnly mistaking themselves (as actors and audience too) for pioneers of social progress; and some earnest women who have slammed the front door on their nearest and dearest stay-at-home duties and privileges, to go questing after problematical rights. It looks, too, as if the same types, modified for worse and better by class conditions, were repeated below the salt; but there the multitude is so great that the individuals are soon lost in a far-off colourless mass—sometimes a menacing mass—by no means so content with stale bread as the others with caviare. To be continue in this ebook

10 Years of the Caine Prize for African Writing

Plus Coetzee, Gordimer, Achebe, Okri

Author: The Caine Prize for African Writing

Publisher: New Internationalist

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 228

View: 126

Celebrating ten years of the leading literary prize for African fiction (dubbed "The African Booker"), 10 Years of the Caine Prize brings together the ten winning stories along with a story each from the four African winners of the Booker Prize: Chinua Achebe, J.M. Coetzee, Nadine Gordimer, and Ben Okri. The ten winners: Leila Aboulela for The Museum Helon Habila for Love Poems Binyavanga Wainaina for Discovering Home Yvonne Adhiambo Owuor for Weight of Whispers Brian Chikwava for Seventh Street Alchemy S.A. Afolabi for Monday Morning Mary Watson for Jungfrau Monica Arac de Nyeko for Jambula Tree Henrietta Rose-Innes for Poison (The tenth winner is to be announced and published in the New Internationalist in July 2009.)

As Chance Would Have It

A Study in Coincidences

Author: H C Moolenburgh

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 192

View: 905

Coincidences happen to everyone on a regular basis. Usually we shrug them off and forget them. However, when we start to catalogue coincidences we are in for a surprise. They begin to grow more frequent and, moreover, they tend to form a pattern as if conveying a secret message.

Art & Lies

A Piece for Three Voices and a Bawd

Author: Jeanette Winterson

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 240

View: 838

'There is no such thing as autobiography, there is only art and lies'. Set in a London of the near future, its three principal characters, Handel, Picasso and Sappho, separately flee the city and find themselves on the same train, drawn to one another through the curious agency of a book. Stories within stories take us through the unlikely love-affairs of one Doll Sneerpiece, an 18th century bawd, and into the world of painful beauty where language has the power to heal. Art & Lies is a question and a quest: How shall I live?

The New Age

A Weekly Review of Politics, Literature and Art

Author: Arthur Moore

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 889