The Chrysanthemum and the Sword

Author: Ruth Benedict

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 307

Essential reading for anyone interested in Japanese culture, this unsurpassed masterwork opens an intriguing window on Japan. Benedict’s World War II–era study paints an illuminating contrast between the culture of Japan and that of the United States. The Chrysanthemum and the Sword is a revealing look at how and why our cultures differ, making it the perfect introduction to Japanese history and customs.

Reading Benedict / Reading Mead

Feminism, Race, and Imperial Visions

Author: Dolores Janiewski

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 296

View: 930

Prominent international scholars explore the lives, works, and legacies of two influential figures in American anthropology. The essays provide a useful and provocative introduction to Benedict and Mead as well as to the ongoing debate about the legacy they left behind.

Without the Chrysanthemum and the Sword

A Study of the Attitudes of Youth in Post-War Japan (Classic Reprint)

Author: Jean Stoetzel

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 360

View: 352

Excerpt from Without the Chrysanthemum and the Sword: A Study of the Attitudes of Youth in Post-War Japan The aim, basically, was to Shorten this distance by providing a certain amount of accurate information to fill the gaps of ignorance and by trying to find a rational means of reducing it. Feeling as I do that, given the right approach, no culture is incomprehensible to a mind formed in any other culture, I should like to dedicate this book to the task, barely begun, of attain ing to a full understanding of all peoples, beginning with the Japanese. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

The Life and Death of Yukio Mishima

Author: Henry Scott Stokes

Publisher: Cooper Square Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 352

View: 978

Novelist, playwright, film actor, martial artist, and political commentator, Yukio Mishima (1925-1970) was arguably the most famous person in Japan at the time of his death. Henry Scott Stokes, one of Mishima's closest friends, was the only non-Japanese allowed to attend the trial of the men involved in Mishima's spectacular suicide. In this insightful and empathetic look at the writer, Stokes guides the reader through the milestones of Mishima's meteoric and eclectic career and delves into the artist's major works and themes. This biography skillfully and compassionately illuminates the achievements and disquieting ideas of a brilliant and deeply troubled man, an artist of whom Nobel Laureate Yasunari Kawabata had said, "A writer of Mishima's caliber comes along only once every two or three hundred years."

Patterns of Culture

Author: Ruth Benedict

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 290

View: 136

Offers an analysis of three strongly contrasting primitive civilizations, showing how behavior is influenced by custom and tradition.

AIA Guide to the Architecture of Atlanta

Author: Gerald W. Sams

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 365

View: 340

This lively guidebook surveys four hundred buildings within the Atlanta metropolitan area--from the sleek marble and glass of the Coca-Cola Tower to the lancet arches and onion domes of the Fox Theater, from the quiet stateliness of Roswell's antebellum mansions to the art-deco charms of the Varsity grill. Published in conjunction with the Atlanta chapter of the American Institute of Architects, it combines historical, descriptive, and critical commentary with more than 250 photographs and area maps. As the book makes clear, Atlanta has two faces: the "Traditional City," striving to strike a balance between the preservation of a valuable past and the challenge of modernization, and also the "Invisible Metropolis," a decentralized city shaped more by the isolated ventures of private business than by public intervention. Accordingly, the city's architecture reflects a dichotomy between the northern-emulating boosterism that made Atlanta a boom town and the genteel aesthetic more characteristic of its southern locale. The city's recent development continues the trend; as Atlanta's workplaces become increasingly "high-tech," its residential areas remain resolutely traditional. In the book's opening section, Dana White places the different stages of Atlanta's growth--from its beginnings as a railroad town to its recent selection as the site of the 1996 Summer Olympics--in their social, cultural, and economic context; Isabelle Gournay then analyzes the major urban and architectural trends from a critical perspective. The main body of the book consists of more than twenty architectural tours organized according to neighborhoods or districts such as Midtown, Druid Hills, West End, Ansley Park, and Buckhead. The buildings described and pictured capture the full range of architectural styles found in the city. Here are the prominent new buildings that have transformed Atlanta's skyline and neighborhoods: Philip John and John Burgee's revivalist IBM Tower, John Portman's taut Westin Peachtree Plaza, and Richard Meier's gleaming, white-paneled High Museum of Art, among others. Here too are landmarks from another era, such as the elegant residences designed in the early twentieth century by Neel Reid and Philip Shutze, two of the first Atlanta-based architects to achieve national prominence. Included as well are the eclectic skyscrapers near Five Points, the postmodern office clusters along Interstate 285, and the Victorian homes of Inman Park. Easy-to-follow area maps complement the descriptive entries and photographs; a bibliography, glossary, and indexes to buildings and architects round out the book. Whether first-time visitors or lifelong residents, readers will find in these pages a wealth of fascinating information about Atlanta's built environment.