China Witness

Voices from a Silent Generation

Author: Xinran

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 448

View: 141

China Witness is the personal testimony of a generation whose stories have not yet been told. Here the grandparents and great-grandparents of today sum up in their own words - for the first and perhaps the last time - the vast changes that have overtaken China's people over a century. The book is at once a journey by the author through time and place, and a memorial to those who have lived through war and civil war, persecution, invasion, revolution, famine, modernization, Westernization - and have survived into the 21st century. We meet everyday heroes, now in their seventies, eighties and nineties, from across this vast country - a herb woman at a market, retired teachers, a legendary 'double-gun woman', Red Guards, oil pioneers, an acrobat, a female general, a lantern maker, taxi drivers, and more- those whose voices, as Xinran says, 'will help our future understand our past'.

Chinese Witness

Of the Young Turk Revolution Kang Youweis Turk Travelogue

Author: Giray Fidan

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 128

View: 914

The dawn of the 20th century changed the world irreversibly. In those days, the two sick men of the East, the Ottoman Empire and Chinas Qing Dynasty, were each facing a major crisis. Kang Youwei, a prominent Chinese philosopher and reformer, arrived in the Ottoman capital in 1908. His work reflects how the Ottoman Empire was viewed from a Chinese philosophers inimitable perspective. This book comprises a full translation of Kang Youweis unique travelogue of the Ottoman Empire during the Young Turk Revolution of 1908.

The Chief Witness

escape from China’s modern-day concentration camps

Author: Sayragul Sauytbay

Publisher: Scribe Publications

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 320

View: 455

A shocking depiction of one of the world’s most ruthless regimes — and the story of one woman’s fight to survive. I will never forget the camp. I cannot forget the eyes of the prisoners, expecting me to do something for them. They are innocent. I have to tell their story, to tell about the darkness they are in. It is so easy to suffocate us with the demons of powerlessness, shame, and guilt. But we aren’t the ones who should feel ashamed. Born in China’s north-western province, Sayragul Sauytbay trained as a doctor before being appointed a senior civil servant. But her life was upended when the Chinese authorities incarcerated her. Her crime: being Kazakh, one of China’s ethnic minorities. The north-western province borders the largest number of foreign nations and is the point in China that is the closest to Europe. In recent years it has become home to over 1,200 penal camps — modern-day gulags that are estimated to house three million members of the Kazakh and Uyghur minorities. Imprisoned solely due to their ethnicity, inmates are subjected to relentless punishment and torture, including being beaten, raped, and used as subjects for medical experiments. The camps represent the greatest systematic incarceration of an entire people since the Third Reich. In prison, Sauytbay was put to work teaching Chinese language, culture, and politics, in the course of which she gained access to secret information that revealed Beijing’s long-term plans to undermine not only its minorities, but democracies around the world. Upon her escape to Europe she was reunited with her family, but still lives under constant the threat of reprisal. This rare testimony from the biggest surveillance state in the world reveals not only the full, frightening scope of China’s tyrannical ambitions, but also the resilience and courage of its author.

The Chief Witness

A Civil Servant's Account of Her Escape from Captivity and of China's Bid for Global Dominance

Author: Sayragul Sauytbay

Publisher: Scribe Us

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 108

A shocking depiction of one of the world's most ruthless regimes--and the story of one woman's fight to survive.I will never forget the camp. I cannot forget the eyes of the prisoners, expecting me to do something for them. They are innocent. I have to tell their story, to tell about the darkness they are in. It is so easy to suffocate us with the demons of powerlessness, shame, and guilt. But we aren't the ones who should feel ashamed. Born in China's north-western province, Sayragul Sauytbay trained as a doctor before being appointed a senior civil servant. But her life was upended when the Chinese authorities incarcerated her. Her crime: being Kazakh, one of the China's ethnic minorities. The north-western province borders the largest number of foreign nations and is the point in China that is the closest to Europe. In recent years it has become home to over 1,200 penal camps--modern-day gulags that are estimated to house three million members of the Kazakh and Uyghur minorities. Imprisoned solely due to their ethnicity, inmates are subjected to relentless punishment and torture, including being beaten, raped, and used as subjects for medical experiments. The camps represent the greatest systematic incarceration of an entire people since the Third Reich. In prison, Sauytbay was put to work teaching Chinese language, culture, and politics, in the course of which she gained access to secret information that revealed Beijing's long-term plans to undermine not only its minorities, but democracies around the world. Upon her escape to Europe she was reunited with her family, but still lives under constant threat of reprisal. This rare testimony from the biggest surveillance state in the world reveals not only the full, frightening scope of China's tyrannical ambitions, but also the resilience and courage of its author.

Witness Against History

Literature, Film, and Public Discourse in Twentieth-century China

Author: Yomi Braester

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 702

This study offers fresh readings of milestones in twentieth-century Chinese fiction, film, and drama and argues that they have questioned the faith in historical progress and in the viability of a sphere of free debate.

The Chinese Box

Author: Christopher New

Publisher: Soho PressInc

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 158

View: 835

The fingers of pianists are broken for playing bourgeois music, teachers are humiliated and worse-the Cultural Revolution is in full fury on the mainland. Hong Kong is rife with rumors and riots. Nonetheless, Dimitri Johnston feels an affinity for China that is not shared by his wife. (She is not so taken with him either.) When he meets a young Chinese dancer, they become infatuated.

A Witness to History

An Overseas Chinese in Mainland China and Macau

Author: Barnabas H. M. Koo

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: China

Page: 334

View: 158

Witness Against History

Literature, Film, and Public Discourse in Twentieth-century China

Author: Yomi Braester

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 511

This study offers fresh readings of milestones in twentieth-century Chinese fiction, film, and drama and argues that they have questioned the faith in historical progress and in the viability of a sphere of free debate.

Letters from Hankow

The Chinese Revolution of 1911 : the Eye Witness Account of Laura Beckingsale

Author: Laura Beckingsale

Publisher: Pomegranate Communications

ISBN:

Category: China

Page: 95

View: 326

Privileged Witness

Memoirs of a Diplomat

Author: Arshad-uz Zaman

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 233

View: 972

Privileged Witness is a journey through history and with the makers of history. Written by a former diplomat, the narrative covers a period of fifty years and takes the reader through important events in the history of Pakistan and Bangladesh. It touches on many important world leaders including Ismet Inonu, Rauf Orbay, Charles de Gaulle, John F. Kennedy, and Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeni.