Encyclopedia of Monasticism: A-L

Author: William M. Johnston

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 1556

View: 371

"This well-written, well-researched reference source brings together monastic life with particular attention to three traditions: Buddhist, Eastern Christian, and Western Christian."--"Outstanding Reference Sources," American Libraries, May 2001.

Fifteenth Century Carthusian Reform

The World of Nicholas Kempf

Author: Dennis D. Martin

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 415

View: 581

"Fifteenth-Century Carthusian Reform" argues that monastic theology offers a medieval Catholic paradigm distinct from the scholastic theology that has been the conventional source for medieval-oriented interpretations of Renaissance and Reformation. It is based on thorough study of the manuscript record. Nicholas Kempf (ca. 1415-1497) taught at the University of Vienna before becoming the head of Carthusian monasteries in rural Austria and Slovenia. Faced with calls for reform in church and society, he placed his confidence in the patristic Christian idea of reform: the reform of the image of God in the human person. This contemplative monastic idea of reform depended on authoritative structures, especially the monastic rule and rational - yet divinely inspired - discernment by a spiritual director. What seemed like simpleminded submission to monastic structures was actually a way to avoid relying on human effort for salvation. By returning to one's true self (the image of God), one opened oneself up for genuine social relationships. To activist reformers, whether adherents of medieval scholasticism, Renaissance humanism, or modern Enlightenment, this monastic idea of reform has seemed escapist, backward-looking, and "womanish." Monks accepted these labels but read them as signs of hidden strength. This book attempts to read through monastic lenses.

Nicholas Love's Mirror and Late Medieval Devotio-Literary Culture

Theological politics and devotional practice in fifteenth-century England

Author: David J. Falls

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 180

View: 892

Surviving in 59 complete manuscript versions, few English texts of the late medieval period seem to have achieved the popularity of Nicholas Love's fifteenth-century translation and adaptation of the Latin Meditationes Vitae Christi - The Mirror of the Blessed Life of Jesus Christ. The Mirror has received surprisingly little scholarly attention and is often contextualized in terms of its role in the theological conflict between English ecclesiastical orthodoxy and the teachings of heresiarch John Wycliff. David Falls presents a new account of the text's history which de-centralises, but does not disregard, the influence of the Wycliffite controversy. Falls interrogates preconceptions and investigates new possibilities for understanding the composition, circulation, function and use of Love's Mirror by examining both the textual modifications and additions made by Love in his adaptation of the Latin, and places these alterations in context by examining individual copies of the Mirror. The manuscript copies are read as both sites of literary consumption and nexuses of textual transition, demonstrating that it was Love's ability to inscribe his work with "functional diversity" which explains the Mirror's popularity. This book presents a nuanced picture not only of the Mirror's production, circulation and function, but also the dynamic and flourishing devotio-literary culture of late medieval England in which Love's text operated.

The Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin West

Author: Alison I. Beach

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page:

View: 953

Monasticism, in all of its variations, was a feature of almost every landscape in the medieval West. So ubiquitous were religious women and men throughout the Middle Ages that all medievalists encounter monasticism in their intellectual worlds. While there is enormous interest in medieval monasticism among Anglophone scholars, language is often a barrier to accessing some of the most important and groundbreaking research emerging from Europe. The Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin West offers a comprehensive treatment of medieval monasticism, from Late Antiquity to the end of the Middle Ages. The essays, specially commissioned for this volume and written by an international team of scholars, with contributors from Australia, Belgium, Canada, England, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland, and the United States, cover a range of topics and themes and represent the most up-to-date discoveries on this topic.

Renaissance and Renewal in the Twelfth Century

Author: Robert L. Benson

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 781

View: 551

Twenty-seven authors approach the diverse areas of the cultural, religious, and social life of the twelfth century. These essays form a basic resource for all interested in this pivotal century. A reprint of the first edition first published in 1982.

Encyclopedia of Monasticism

Author: William M. Johnston

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 4611

View: 578

The two-volume Encyclopedia of Monasticism describes the monastic traditions of both Christianity and Buddhism with more than 600 entries on important monastic figures of all periods and places, surveys of countries and localities, and topical essays covering a wide range of issues (e.g., art, behavior, economics, liturgy, politics, theology, and scholarship). Coverage encompasses not only geography and history worldwide but also the contemporary dilemmas of monastic life. Recent upheavals in certain countries are highlighted (Korea, Russia, Sri Lanka, etc.). Topical essays subtitled Christian Perspectives and Buddhist Perspectives explore in imaginative fashion comparisons and contrasts between Christian and Buddhist monasticism. Encyclopedia of Monasticism also includes more than 500 color and black and white illustrations covering all aspects of monastic life, art, and architecture.

Renewing Christianity

A History of Church Reform from Day One to Vatican II

Author: Christopher M. Bellitto

Publisher: Paulist Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 260

View: 718

This book follows the tide of reform and renewal in Church history, and demonstrates that reform has always been an essential element of Christianity. Indeed, Christopher Bellitto emphasizes that reform should not be perceived as limited to the Reformation or Vatican II. As one learns from the author's analysis, the history of Christianity is little other than the history of reform. This sweeping assessment of Church history is both remarkable and deep, but is also highly readable. Bellitto begins with an introduction to the subject of reform and follows that with chapters on the patristic period and Carolingian Renaissance, the High Middle Ages (1050-1300), Avignon to Trent, From Trent to Modernity, and Vatican II. He ends with a conclusion that draws together the recurring themes and patterns of reform activity in the Church. In short, this is a unique book on the subject of Church reform. Renewing Christianity is useful to both scholars and non-academics alike. It is written in a learnedly popular style, and would appeal to clergy, seminarians, academics, graduate students or anyone interested in Church reform and renewal, Church history, or historical theology. +

Monasticism in Modern Times

Author: Isabelle Jonveaux

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 234

View: 574

This book presents a broad sociological perspective on the contemporary issues facing Christian monasticism. Since the founding work of Max Weber, the sociology of monasticism has received little attention. However, the field is now being revitalized by some new research. Focusing on Christian monks and nuns, the contributors explore continuity and discontinuity with the past in what superficially might appear a monolithic tradition. Contributors speak not only about monasticism in Europe and the United States but also in Africa and Latin America, a different landscape where the question of recruitment does not figure among issues considered as problematic.

Kingship and Masculinity in Late Medieval England

Author: Katherine Lewis

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 353

View: 406

Kingship and Masculinity in Late Medieval England explores the dynamic between kingship and masculinity in fifteenth century England, with a particular focus on Henry V and Henry VI. The role of gender in the rhetoric and practice of medieval kingship is still largely unexplored by medieval historians. Discourses of masculinity informed much of the contemporary comment on fifteenth century kings, for a variety of purposes: to praise and eulogise but also to explain shortcomings and provide justification for deposition. Katherine J. Lewis examines discourses of masculinity in relation to contemporary understandings of the nature and acquisition of manhood in the period and considers the extent to which judgements of a king’s performance were informed by his ability to embody the right balance of manly qualities. This book’s primary concern is with how these two kings were presented, represented and perceived by those around them, but it also asks how far Henry V and Henry VI can be said to have understood the importance of personifying a particular brand of masculinity in their performance of kingship and of meeting the expectations of their subjects in this respect. It explores the extent to which their established reputations as inherently ‘manly’ and ‘unmanly’ kings were the product of their handling of political circumstances, but owed something to factors beyond their immediate control as well. Consideration is also given to Margaret of Anjou’s manipulation of ideologies of kingship and manhood in response to her husband’s incapacity, and the ramifications of this for perceptions of the relational gender identities which she and Henry VI embodied together. Kingship and Masculinity in Late Medieval England is an essential resource for students of gender and medieval history.