Canon Constitution and Canon Change in Children’s Literature

Author: Bettina Kümmerling-Meibauer

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 254

View: 773

This volume focuses on the (de)canonization processes in children’s literature, considering the construction and cultural-historical changes of canons in different children’s literatures. Chapters by international experts in the field explore a wide range of different children’s literatures from Great Britain, Germany, Scandinavia, the Low Countries, Eastern and Central Europe, as well as from Non-European countries such as Australia, Israel, and the United States. Situating the inquiry within larger literary and cultural studies conversations about canonicity, the contributors assess representative authors and works that have encountered changing fates in the course of canon history. Particular emphasis is given to sociological canon theories, which have so far been under-represented in canon research in children’s literature. The volume therefore relates historical changes in the canon of children’s literature not only to historical changes in concepts of childhood but to more encompassing political, social, economic, cultural, and ideological shifts. This volume’s comparative approach takes cognizance of the fact that, if canon formation is an important cultural factor in nation-building processes, a comparative study is essential to assessing transnational processes in canon formation. This book thus renders evident the structural similarities between patterns and strategies of canon formation emerging in different children’s literatures.

Canon Constitution and Canon Change in Children’s Literature

Author: Bettina Kümmerling-Meibauer

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 254

View: 623

This volume focuses on the (de)canonization processes in children’s literature, considering the construction and cultural-historical changes of canons in different children’s literatures. Chapters by international experts in the field explore a wide range of different children’s literatures from Great Britain, Germany, Scandinavia, the Low Countries, Eastern and Central Europe, as well as from Non-European countries such as Australia, Israel, and the United States. Situating the inquiry within larger literary and cultural studies conversations about canonicity, the contributors assess representative authors and works that have encountered changing fates in the course of canon history. Particular emphasis is given to sociological canon theories, which have so far been under-represented in canon research in children’s literature. The volume therefore relates historical changes in the canon of children’s literature not only to historical changes in concepts of childhood but to more encompassing political, social, economic, cultural, and ideological shifts. This volume’s comparative approach takes cognizance of the fact that, if canon formation is an important cultural factor in nation-building processes, a comparative study is essential to assessing transnational processes in canon formation. This book thus renders evident the structural similarities between patterns and strategies of canon formation emerging in different children’s literatures.

Literary Canon Formation as Nation-Building in Central Europe and the Baltics

19th to Early 20th Century

Author:

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 342

View: 949

This volume presents regional approaches on the formation and transformation of national literary canons as a practice of nation-building in various cultural traditions (Polish, Hungarian, Lithuanian, Estonian, etc.) from the 19th century to the present times.

Transdisciplinary Perspectives on Childhood in Contemporary Britain

Literature, Media and Society

Author: Sandra Dinter

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 250

View: 159

In the light of the complex demographic shifts associated with late modernity and the impetus of neo-liberal politics, childhood continues all the more to operate as a repository for the articulation of diverse social and cultural anxieties. Since the Thatcher years, juvenile delinquency, child poverty, and protection have been persistent issues in public discourse. Simultaneously, childhood has advanced as a popular subject in the arts, as the wealth of current films and novels in this field indicates. Focusing on the late twentieth and the early twenty-first centuries, this collection assembles contributions concerned with current political, social, and cultural dimensions of childhood in the United Kingdom. The individual chapters, written by internationally renowned experts from the social sciences and the humanities, address a broad spectrum of contemporary childhood issues, including debates on child protection, school dress codes, the media, the representation and construction of children in audiovisual media, and literary awards for children’s fiction. Appealing to a wide scholarly audience by joining perspectives from various disciplines, including art history, education, law, film and TV studies, sociology, and literary studies, this volume endorses a transdisciplinary and meta-theoretical approach to the study of childhood. It seeks to both illustrate and dismantle the various ways in which childhood has been implicitly and explicitly conceived in different disciplines in the wake of the constructivist paradigm shift in childhood studies.

Edinburgh Companion to Children's Literature

Author: Clementine Beauvais

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 224

View: 839

Introduces you to the promises and problems of Charles Taylor's thought in major contemporary debates

Children's Literature

Author: Carrie Hintz

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 188

View: 750

Children’s Literature is an accessible introduction to this engaging field. Carrie Hintz offers a defining conceptual overview of children’s literature that presents its competing histories, its cultural contexts, and the theoretical debates it has instigated. Positioned within the wider field of adult literary, film, and television culture, this book also covers: Ideological and political movements Children’s literature in the age of globalization Postcolonial literature, ecocriticism, and animal studies Each chapter includes a case study featuring well-known authors and titles, including Charlotte’s Web, Edward Lear, and Laura Ingalls Wilder. With a comprehensive glossary and further reading, this book is invaluable reading for anyone studying Children’s Literature.

Affect, Emotion, and Children’s Literature

Representation and Socialisation in Texts for Children and Young Adults

Author: Kristine Moruzi

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 216

View: 408

This volume explores the relationship between representation, affect, and emotion in texts for children and young adults. It demonstrates how texts for young people function as tools for emotional socialisation, enculturation, and political persuasion. The collection provides an introduction to this emerging field and engages with the representation of emotions, ranging from shame, grief, and anguish to compassion and happiness, as psychological and embodied states and cultural constructs with ideological significance. It also explores the role of narrative empathy in relation to emotional socialisation and to the ethics of representation in relation to politics, social justice, and identity categories including gender, ethnicity, disability, and sexuality. Addressing a range of genres, including advice literature, novels, picture books, and film, this collection examines contemporary, historical, and canonical children’s and young adult literature to highlight the variety of approaches to emotion and affect in these texts and to consider the ways in which these approaches offer new perspectives on these texts. The individual chapters apply a variety of theoretical approaches and perspectives, including cognitive poetics, narratology, and poststructuralism, to the analysis of affect and emotion in children’s and young adult literature.

Keywords for Children's Literature, Second Edition

Author: Philip Nel

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 610

Introduces key terms, global concepts, debates, and histories for Children's Literature in an updated edition Over the past decade, there has been a proliferation of exciting new work across many areas of children’s literature and culture. Mapping this vibrant scholarship, the Second Edition of Keywords for Children’s Literature presents original essays on essential terms and concepts in the field. Covering ideas from “Aesthetics” to “Voice,” an impressive multidisciplinary cast of scholars explores and expands on the vocabulary central to the study of children’s literature. The second edition of this Keywords volume goes beyond disciplinary and national boundaries. Across fifty-nine print essays and nineteen online essays, it includes contributors from twelve countries and an international advisory board from over a dozen more. The fully revised and updated selection of critical writing—more than half of the essays are new to this edition—reflects an intentionally multinational perspective, taking into account non-English traditions and what childhood looks like in an age of globalization. All authors trace their keyword’s uses and meanings: from translation to poetry, taboo to diversity, and trauma to nostalgia, the book’s scope, clarity, and interdisciplinary play between concepts make this new edition of Keywords for Children’s Literature essential reading for scholars and students alike.

A Companion to Children's Literature

Author: Karen Coats

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 496

View: 701

A COMPANION TO CHILDREN’S LITERATURE A collection of international, up-to-date, and diverse perspectives on children’s literary criticism A Companion to Children’s Literature offers students and scholars studying children’s literature, education, and youth librarianship an incisive and expansive collection of essays that discuss key debates within children’s literature criticism. The thirty-four works included demonstrate a diverse array of perspectives from around the world, introduce emerging scholars to the field of children’s literature criticism, and meaningfully contribute to the scholarly conversation. The essays selected by the editors present a view of children’s literature that encompasses poetry, fiction, folklore, nonfiction, dramatic stage and screen performances, picturebooks, and interactive and digital media. They range from historical overviews to of-the-moment critical theory about children’s books from across the globe. A Companion to Children’s Literature explores some of the earliest works in children’s literature, key developments in the genre from the 20th century, and the latest trends and texts in children’s information books, postmodern fairytales, theatre, plays, and more. This collection also discusses methods for reading children’s literature, from social justice critiques of popular stories to Black critical theory in the context of children’s literary analysis.

Italian Children’s Literature and National Identity

Childhood, Melancholy, Modernity

Author: Maria Truglio

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 208

View: 187

This book bridges the fields of Children’s Literature and Italian Studies by examining how turn-of-the-century children’s books forged a unified national identity for the new Italian State. Through contextualized close readings of a wide range of texts, Truglio shows how the 19th-century concept of recapitulation, which held that ontogeny (the individual’s development) repeats phylogeny (the evolution of the species), underlies the strategies of this corpus. Italian fairy tales, novels, poems, and short stories imply that the personal development of the child corresponds to and hence naturalizes the modernizing development of the nation. In the context of Italy’s uneven and ambivalent modernization, these narrative trajectories are enabled by a developmental melancholia. Using a psychoanalytic lens, and in dialogue with recent Anglophone Children’s Literature criticism, this study proposes that national identity was constructed via a process of renouncing and incorporating paternal and maternal figures, rendered as compulsory steps into maturity and modernity. With chapters on the heroic figure of Garibaldi, the Orientalized depiction of the South, and the role of girls in formation narratives, this book discloses how melancholic itineraries produced gendered national subjects. This study engages both well-known Italian texts, such as Collodi’s The Adventures of Pinocchio and De Amicis’ Heart, and books that have fallen into obscurity by authors such as Baccini, Treves, Gianelli, and Nuccio. Its approach and corpus shed light on questions being examined by Italianists, Children’s Literature scholars, and social and cultural historians with an interest in national identity formation.