California Prehistory

Colonization, Culture, and Complexity

Author: Terry L. Jones

Publisher: Rowman Altamira

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 394

View: 491

Reader of original synthesizing articles for introductory courses on archaeology and native peoples of California.

Archaeology of Prehistoric Native America

An Encyclopedia

Author: Guy E. Gibbon

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 941

View: 775

First published in 1998. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Contemporary Issues in California Archaeology

Author: Society for American Archaeology, Meeting Staff

Publisher: Left Coast Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 396

View: 789

Recent archaeological research on California includes a greater diversity of models and approaches to the region’s past, as older literature on the subject struggles to stay relevant. This comprehensive volume offers an in-depth look at the most recent theoretical and empirical developments in the field including key controversies relevant to the Golden State: coastal colonization, impacts of comets and drought cycles, systems of power, Polynesian contacts, and the role of indigenous peoples in the research process, among others. With a specific emphasis on those aspects of California’s past that resonate with the state’s modern cultural identity, the editors and contributors—all leading figures in California archaeology—seek a new understanding of the myth and mystique of the Golden State.

Prehistoric California

archaeology and the myth of paradise

Author: L. Mark Raab

Publisher: Univ of Utah Pr

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 266

View: 453

IN THIS ANTHOLOGY, Mark Raab and Terry Jones present a series of research articles that dispel lingering mythologies about California's prehistory. They begin with the most enduring notion--that of an essentially stable, benign climate--presenting evidence that prehistoric climate flux played a significant role in culture change. From there, Raab and Jones assault the myth of California as a natural cornucopia. They show that prehistoric foragers themselves had the capacity to negatively affect their animal food supplies, and that what is often considered the premier vegetal food, the acorn, appeared much later than many suppose in the diets of native peoples. This collection effectively summarizes the major debates surrounding California archaeology and provides a solid basis for a new, more nuanced view of the state's prehistory.

Encyclopedia of Prehistory

Volume 6: North America

Author: Peter N. Peregrine

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 509

View: 390

The Encyclopedia of Prehistory represents temporal dimension. Major traditions are an attempt to provide basic information also defined by a somewhat different set of on all archaeologically known cultures, sociocultural characteristics than are eth covering the entire globe and the entire nological cultures. Major traditions are prehistory of humankind. It is designed as defined based on common subsistence a tool to assist in doing comparative practices, sociopolitical organization, and research on the peoples of the past. Most material industries, but language, ideology, of the entries are written by the world's and kinship ties play little or no part in foremost experts on the particular areas their definition because they are virtually and time periods. unrecoverable from archaeological con The Encyclopedia is organized accord texts. In contrast, language, ideology, and ing to major traditions. A major tradition kinship ties are central to defining ethno is defined as a group of populations sharing logical cultures.