Building an Empire

The Most Complete Blueprint to Building a Massive Network Marketing Business

Author: Brian Carruthers

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Multilevel marketing

Page: 269

View: 724

Empire-building and Empire-builders

Twelve Studies

Author: Edward Ingram

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 252

View: 139

The twelve studies of empire-building and empire-builders which make up this volume range widely across the dream world that was the British Empire from the late eighteenth century to the Second World War. The essays re-interpret the work of imperial heroes, eminent historians, and fictional heroines. They illustrate the variety of techniques used by British empire-builders and the variety of explanations they gave to account for their sometimes infamous behaviour.

Buildings of Empire

Author: Ashley Jackson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 317

View: 640

An exciting journey to thirteen buildings that capture the essence of the British imperial experience, painting an intimate portrait of the biggest empire the world has ever seen: the people who made it and the people who resisted it, as well as the legacy of the imperial project throughout the world.

Building an Empire (Next Level Edition)

The Most Complete Blueprint to Building a Massive Network Marketing Business

Author: Brian Carruthers

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 714

Brian Carruthers has built one of the largest, most profitable downline teams in all of network marketing in the last decade. His success system helped his team grow to more than 350,000 distributors, including countless stories of lives being changed for the better by the incomes generated. Beyond the surface success of gaining wealth and living the dream lifestyle as an eight-figure income earner, Brian's alignment of personal goals with a greater purpose of helping to change lives has fueled his passion for this profession. Brian pours nearly 20 years of knowledge, experience, and wisdom from being in the field working with thousands of distributors into this groundbreaking book. Use it as your comprehensive manual/guidebook and you will save yourself from going down the wrong paths, avoid the pitfalls that stop many networkers in their journeys, and cut years off your learning curve. Applying the wisdom from this book will make you more effective, more profitable, and you will have more fun on your rise to the top while you are Building Your Empire!

Building an American Empire

The Era of Territorial and Political Expansion

Author: Paul Frymer

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 312

View: 640

How American westward expansion was governmentally engineered to promote the formation of a white settler nation Westward expansion of the United States is most conventionally remembered for rugged individualism, geographic isolationism, and a fair amount of luck. Yet the establishment of the forty-eight contiguous states was hardly a foregone conclusion, and the federal government played a critical role in its success. This book examines the politics of American expansion, showing how the government's regulation of population movements on the frontier, both settlement and removal, advanced national aspirations for empire and promoted the formation of a white settler nation. Building an American Empire details how a government that struggled to exercise plenary power used federal land policy to assert authority over the direction of expansion by engineering the pace and patterns of settlement and to control the movement of populations. At times, the government mobilized populations for compact settlement in strategically important areas of the frontier; at other times, policies were designed to actively restrain settler populations in order to prevent violence, international conflict, and breakaway states. Paul Frymer examines how these settlement patterns helped construct a dominant racial vision for America by incentivizing and directing the movement of white European settlers onto indigenous and diversely populated lands. These efforts were hardly seamless, and Frymer pays close attention to the failures as well, from the lack of further expansion into Latin America to the defeat of the black colonization movement. Building an American Empire reveals the lasting and profound significance government settlement policies had for the nation, both for establishing America as dominantly white and for restricting broader aspirations for empire in lands that could not be so racially engineered.

Genghis Khan and the Building of the Mongol Empire

Author: Marcia Amidon Lusted

Publisher: The Rosen Publishing Group, Inc

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 64

View: 852

Though most often remembered as one of the most brutal military conquerors of all time, Mongol leader Genghis Khan also introduced many enlightened methods of ruling, laws, and government systems that are still used today. From his childhood on the Mongolian steppe to his election as khan, Genghis Khan went on to establish an empire that stretched across Eurasia and that was held together through law and order. This resource will examine his life, his rule, and his legacy in today’s world.

Unhomely Empire

Whiteness and Belonging, c.1760-1830

Author: Onni Gust

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 907

This book examines the role of Scottish Enlightenment ideas of belonging in the construction and circulation of white supremacist thought that sought to justify British imperial rule. During the 18th century, European imperial expansion radically increased population mobility through the forging of new trade routes, war, disease, enslavement and displacement. In this book, Onni Gust argues that this mass movement intersected with philosophical debates over what it meant to belong to a nation, civilization, and even humanity itself. Unhomely Empire maps the consolidation of a Scottish Enlightenment discourse of 'home' and 'exile' through three inter-related case studies and debates; slavery and abolition in the Caribbean, Scottish Highland emigration to North America, and raising white girls in colonial India. Playing out over poetry, political pamphlets, travel writing, philosophy, letters and diaries, these debates offer a unique insight into the movement of ideas across a British imperial literary network. Using this rich cultural material, Gust argues that whiteness was central to 19th-century liberal imperialism's understanding of belonging, whilst emotional attachment and the perceived ability, or inability, to belong were key concepts in constructions of racial difference.

The End of Empire?

The Transformation of the USSR in Comparative Perspective

Author: S. Frederick Starr

Publisher: M.E. Sharpe

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 374

View: 946

The collapse of the Soviet Union was part of a process of imperial disintegration, new state-building and potential imperial reconstruction unprecedented in recent decades. This volume assembles an interdisciplinary group of scholars to construct, deconstruct and reconstruct the Soviet empire.

Monumentality and the Roman Empire

Architecture in the Antonine Age

Author: Edmund Thomas

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 406

View: 987

The quality of 'monumentality' is attributed to the buildings of few historical epochs or cultures more frequently or consistently than to those of the Roman Empire. It is this quality that has helped to make them enduring models for builders of later periods. This extensively illustrated book, the first full-length study of the concept of monumentality in Classical Antiquity, asks what it is that the notion encompasses and how significant it was for the Romans themselves in moulding their individual or collective aspirations and identities. Although no single word existed in antiquity for the qualities that modern authors regard as making up that term, its Latin derivation - from monumentum, 'a monument' - attests plainly to the presence of the concept in the mentalities of ancient Romans, and the development of that notion through the Roman era laid the foundation for the classical ideal of monumentality, which reached a height in early modern Europe. This book is also the first full-length study of architecture in the Antonine Age - when it is generally agreed the Roman Empire was at its height. By exploring the public architecture of Roman Italy and both Western and Eastern provinces of the Roman Empire from the point of view of the benefactors who funded such buildings, the architects who designed them, and the public who used and experienced them, Edmund Thomas analyses the reasons why Roman builders sought to construct monumental buildings and uncovers the close link between architectural monumentality and the identity and ideology of the Roman Empire itself.

Empire in the New Testament

Author: Stanley E. Porter

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 320

View: 379

How does a Christian render unto Caesar what is Caesar's, and unto God what is God's? This book is the result of the Bingham Colloquium of 2007 that brought scholars from across North America to examine the New Testament's response to the empires of God and Caesar. Two chapters lay the foundation for that response in the Old Testament's concept of empire, and six others address the response to the notion of empire, both human and divine, in the various authors of the New Testament. A final chapter investigates how the church fathers regarded the matter. The essays display various methods and positions; together, however, they offer a representative sample of the current state of study of the notion of empire in the New Testament.