British Steam Sunset

A Vision of the Final Years, 1965–1968

Author: Jim Blake

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 112

View: 524

In this new album from Pen & Sword, transport historian and photographer Jim Blake presents a selection of pictures he took around the country in British steam's final years.British Railways withdrew their last steam engines with almost indecent haste in the mid- to late–1960s, many having seen only a few years' service before consignment to the scrapheap. Jim's pictures graphically show how not only the locomotives themselves were neglected in their final years, but also their working environment. Their motive power depots were also badly run down, particularly when slated for closure upon steam's demise.Most of Jim's pictures of steam locomotives, taken fifty years ago, are previously unpublished. In BR steam's last two years, they were based in two distinctly different areas on the London & South Western main line, and in the industrial north. However, their decline was just as sad and depressing in both areas once proud depots such as London's Nine Elms, with broken windows and roof open to the sky, not repaired after wartime, piles of ash and clinker everywhere, were just as derelict as those in such places as Wigan or Sunderland. Many scenes herein invoke the sad, eerie atmosphere of steam's last months.Ironically, it was London Transport who operated the last publicly-owned standard gauge steam locomotives in 1971, some three years after BR's had gone. These are included within these pages too.

British Steam: Military Connections

Great Western Railway, Southern Railway, British Railways & War Department Steam Locomotives

Author: Fred Kerr

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 240

View: 993

In Great Britain there existed a practice of naming steam locomotives. The names chosen covered many and varied subjects, however a large number of those represented direct links with military personnel, regiments, squadrons, naval vessels, aircraft, battles and associated historic events. For example, all but one member of the famous Royal Scot class were named in honor of British regiments. Also the Southern Railway created a Battle of Britain class of locomotives, which were named in recognition of Battle of Britain squadrons, airfields, aircraft and personnel. In addition, the Great Western Railway renamed some of its engines after Second World War aircraft. The tradition has continued into modern times as the newly built A1 class locomotive is named Tornado in recognition of the jet fighter aircraft of the same name. This generously illustrated publication highlights the relevant steam locomotives and additionally examines the origin of the military names.

British Steam BR Standard Locomotives

Author: Keith Langston

Publisher: Casemate Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 208

View: 333

After WWII the existing railway companies were all put into the control of the newly formed British Transport Commission and that government organization spawned British Railways, which came into being on 1st January 1948. The railway infrastructure had suffered badly during the war years and most of the steam locomotives were 'tired' and badly maintained and or life expired. Although the management of British Railways was already planning to replace steam power with diesel and electric engines/units they still took a decision to build more steam locomotives (as a stop gap). Some 999 (yes just 1 short) Standard locomotives were built in 12 classes ranging from super powerful express and freight engine to suburban tank locomotives. The locomotives were mainly in good order when the order came in 1968 to end steam, some only 8 years old.There still exists a fleet of 46 preserved Standards of which 75% are in working order in and around the UKs preserved railways, furthermore 3 new build standard locomotives are proposed. Steam fans who were around in the 1960s all remember the 'Standards'.

British Steam: BR Standard Locomotives

Author: Fred Kerr

Publisher: Casemate Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 208

View: 560

After WWII the existing railway companies were all put into the control of the newly formed British Transport Commission and that government organization spawned British Railways, which came into being on 1st January 1948. The railway infrastructure had suffered badly during the war years and most of the steam locomotives were 'tired' and badly maintained and or life expired. Although the management of British Railways was already planning to replace steam power with diesel and electric engines/units they still took a decision to build more steam locomotives (as a stop gap). Some 999 (yes just 1 short) Standard locomotives were built in 12 classes ranging from super powerful express and freight engine to suburban tank locomotives. The locomotives were mainly in good order when the order came in 1968 to end steam, some only 8 years old.There still exists a fleet of 46 preserved Standards of which 75% are in working order in and around the UKs preserved railways, furthermore 3 new build standard locomotives are proposed. Steam fans who were around in the 1960s all remember the 'Standards'.

Classic British Steam Locos

Author: compiled from Wikipedia entries and published byby DrGoogelberg

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 879

Whitaker's Cumulative Book List

A Classified List of Publications...together with an Index to Authors and Titles

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: English literature

Page:

View: 653

The Victorian Sunset

Author: Esmé Cecil Wingfield-Stratford

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: England

Page: 396

View: 151

Sunset

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: California

Page:

View: 115

A Companion to British Art

1600 to the Present

Author: David Peters Corbett

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 592

View: 262

This companion is a collection of newly-commissioned essays written by leading scholars in the field, providing a comprehensive introduction to British art history. A generously-illustrated collection of newly-commissioned essays which provides a comprehensive introduction to the history of British art Combines original research with a survey of existing scholarship and the state of the field Touches on the whole of the history of British art, from 800-2000, with increasing attention paid to the periods after 1500 Provides the first comprehensive introduction to British art of the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries, one of the most lively and innovative areas of art-historical study Presents in depth the major preoccupations that have emerged from recent scholarship, including aesthetics, gender, British art’s relationship to Modernity, nationhood and nationality, and the institutions of the British art world