Interlibrary Loan Practices Handbook

Author: Virginia Boucher

Publisher: American Library Association

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 249

View: 189

Advises libraries on implementing and maintaining interlibrary loan policies, discussing reciprocal borrowing, out-of-system loans, and the use of bibliographic utilties

Introduction to Reference Sources in the Health Sciences, Sixth Edition

Author: Jeffrey T. Huber

Publisher: American Library Association

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 488

View: 892

Prepared in collaboration with the Medical Library Association, this completely updated, revised, and expanded edition lists classic and up-to-the-minute print and electronic resources in the health sciences, helping librarians find the answers that library users seek. Included are electronic versions of traditionally print reference sources, trustworthy electronic-only resources, and resources that library users can access from home or on the go through freely available websites or via library licenses. In this benchmark guide, the authors Include new chapters on health information seeking, point-of-care sources, and global health sources Focus on works that can be considered foundational or essential, in both print and electronic formats Address questions librarians need to consider in developing and maintaining their reference collections When it comes to questions involving the health sciences, this valuable resource will point both library staff and the users they serve in the right direction.

Charles Dickens's Our Mutual Friend

A Publishing History

Author: Sean Grass

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 304

View: 442

Even within the context of Charles Dickens's history as a publishing innovator, Our Mutual Friend is notable for what it reveals about Dickens as an author and about Victorian publishing. Marking Dickens's return to the monthly number format after nearly a decade of writing fiction designed for weekly publication in All the Year Round, Our Mutual Friend emerged against the backdrop of his failing health, troubled relationship with Ellen Ternan, and declining reputation among contemporary critics. In his subtly argued publishing history, Sean Grass shows how these difficulties combined to make Our Mutual Friend an extraordinarily odd novel, no less in its contents and unusually heavy revisions than in its marketing by Chapman and Hall, its transformation from a serial into British and U.S. book editions, its contemporary reception by readers and reviewers, and its delightfully uneven reputation among critics in the 150 years since Dickens’s death. Enhanced by four appendices that offer contemporary accounts of the Staplehurst railway accident, information on archival materials, transcripts of all of the contemporary reviews, and a select bibliography of editions, Grass’s book shows why this last of Dickens’s finished novels continues to intrigue its readers and critics.