Profiles from Brills Content

Author: Writers of Brill's Content

Publisher: Contentville Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 223

View: 530

The most memorable profiles of some of the most controversial, discussed, and interesting people making, covering, and disseminating the media from the pages of "Brill's Content." PROFILES FROM BRILL'S CONTENT magazine brings together some of the best, toughest, and most insightful writing about the figures who create media from the magazine committed to studying it. From Abigail Pogrebin's interview with John F. Kennedy, Jr. (one of the last he gave before his death in July of 1999) and Katherine Rosman's portrait of the elusive chronicler of (and sometimes friend to) Hollywood stars, Lynn Hirschberg, to Gay Jervey's much-discussed profiles on "The New York Times's" reporter-about-town Alex Kuczynski and acid-penned columnist Maureen Dowd, these features offer both unforgettable portraits of some of our most intriguing and powerful media figures as well as a discerning history of the machinations behind the most complex, exciting, and treacherous media culture ever.

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Category: American periodicals

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Mother Jones Magazine

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Page: 98

View: 787

Mother Jones is an award-winning national magazine widely respected for its groundbreaking investigative reporting and coverage of sustainability and environmental issues.

Mass Communication

Living in a Media World

Author: Ralph E. Hanson

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 528

View: 987

"An entertaining, informative and thoughtful mass media text that keeps students engaged." —Charles W. Little Jr., Santa Ana College Transform your students into smart, savvy media consumers. A book that students find fun to read and instructors consider educationally valuable, Mass Communication: Living in a Media World provides the media literacy principles and critical thinking skills that students need to become self-aware media consumers. Known for his storytelling approach, bestselling author Ralph E. Hanson uses examples drawn from everyday life to explain the many dimensions of mass media that operate in our society. This newly revised Seventh Edition is packed with contemporary examples and compelling stories that illustrate the latest developments and recent events that are changing the face of media today. A Complete Teaching & Learning Package SAGE Premium Video Included in the interactive eBook! SAGE Premium Video tools and resources boost comprehension and bolster analysis. Preview a video now. Interactive eBook Includes access to SAGE Premium Video, multimedia tools, and much more! Save when you bundle the interactive eBook with the new edition. Order using bundle ISBN: 978-1-5443-5323-4. Learn more. SAGE coursepacks FREE! Easily import our quality instructor and student resource content into your school’s learning management system (LMS) and save time. Learn more. SAGE edge FREE online resources for students that make learning easier. See how your students benefit. SAGE lecture spark Spark lively classroom discussion around current events. Learn more about free lecture launchers. Author blog Get the latest industry news, tips for teaching the Mass Communication course, sample exercises, and more. Learn more at www.ralphehanson.com Check out the VIP site now!

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Five Presidents And The Legacy Of Watergate

Author: Bob Woodward

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 464

View: 966

Twenty-five years after Richard Nixon's resignation, investigative journalist Bob Woodward examines the legacy of Watergate. Based on hundreds of interviews - both on and off the record - and three years of research of government archives, Woodward's latest book explains in detail how the premier scandal of US history has indelibly altered the shape of American politics and culture - and has limited the power to act of the presidency itself. Bob Woodward's mix of historical perspective and journalistic sleuthing provides a unique perspective on the repercussions of Watergate and proves that it was far more than a passing, embarrassing crisis in American politics: it heralded the beginning of a new period of troubled presidencies. From Ford through to Clinton, presidents have battled public scepticism, a challenging Congress, adversarial press and even special prosecutors in their term in office. Now, a quarter of a century after the scandal emerged, the man who helped expose Watergate shows us the stunning impact of its heritage.

How the Left Can Win Arguments and Influence People

A Tactical Manual for Pragmatic Progressives

Author: John K. Wilson

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 288

View: 797

If we were to rely on what the pundits and politicians tell us, we would have to conclude that America is a deeply conservative nation. Americans, we hear constantly, detest government, demand lower taxes and the end of welfare, and favor the death penalty, prayer in school, and an absolute faith in the free market. And yet Americans believe deeply in progressive ideas. In fact, progressivism has long been a powerful force in the American psyche. Consider that a mere generation ago the struggle for environmentally sound policies, for women's rights, and for racial equality were fringe movements. Today, open opposition to these core ideals would be political suicide. Drawing on this wellspring of American progressivist tradition, John K. Wilson has penned an informal handbook for the pragmatic progressive. Wilson insists that the left must become more savvy in its rhetoric and stop preaching only to the converted. Progressives need to attack the tangible realities of the corporate welfare state, while explicitly acknowledging that "socialism is," as Wilson writes, "deader than Lenin." Rather than attacking a "right-wing conspiracy," Wilson argues that the left needs one, too. Tracing how well-funded conservative pressure groups have wielded their influence and transformed the national agenda, Wilson outlines a similar approach for the left. Along the way, he exposes the faultlines of our poll- and money-driven form of politics, explodes the myth of "the liberal media," and demands that the left explicitly change its image. Irreverent, practical, and urgently argued, How The Left Can Win Arguments and Influence People charts a way to translate progressive ideals into reality and reassert the core principles of the American left on the national stage.

Making Hard Choices in Journalism Ethics

Cases and Practice

Author: David E. Boeyink

Publisher: Routledge

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Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 224

View: 743

This book teaches students how to make the difficult ethical decisions that journalists routinely face. By taking a case-based approach, the authors argue that the best way to make an ethical decision is to look closely at a particular situation, rather than looking first to an abstract set of ethical theories or principles. This book goes beyond the traditional approaches of many other journalism textbooks by using cases as the starting point for building ethical practices. Casuistry, the technical name of such a method, develops provisional guidelines from the bottom up by reasoning analogically from an "easy" ethical case (the "paradigm") to "harder" ethical cases. Thoroughly grounded in actual experience, this method admits more nuanced judgments than most theoretical approaches.

Gerald Ford and the Challenges of the 1970s

Author: Yanek Mieczkowski

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

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Category: Political Science

Page: 480

View: 840

For many Americans, Gerald Ford evokes an image of either an unelected president who abruptly pardoned his corrupt predecessor or an accident-prone klutz who failed to provide skilled leadership. In Gerald Ford and the Challenges of the 1970s, Yanek Mieczkowski reexamines Ford's two and a half years in office, showing that his presidency successfully confronted the most vexing crisis of postwar era. Viewing the 1970s primarily through the lens of economic events, Mieczkowski argues that Ford's understanding of the national economy was better than any modern president, that he oversaw a dramatic reduction of inflation, and that he attempted to solve the energy crisis with judicious policies. Throughout his presidency, Ford labored under the legacy of Watergate. Democrats scored landslide victories in the 1974 midterm elections, and within an anemic Republican Party, the right wing challenged Ford's leadership, even as pundits predicted the GOP's death. Yet Ford reinvigorated the party and fashioned a 1976 campaign strategy against Jimmy Carter that brought him from thirty points behind to a dead heat on election day. Mieczkowski draws on numerous personal interviews with former President Ford, cabinet officials, and members of the Ninety-fourth Congress, and he skillfully weaves into his discussion such 1970s cultural phenomena as the spoofs about the president on Saturday Night Live. The first major work on Ford to appear in more than a decade, Gerald Ford and the Challenges of the 1970s combines the best of biography and presidential history to paint an intriguing portrait of a president, his times, and his legacy.

The Best American Magazine Writing 2014

Author: Sid Holt

Publisher: Columbia University Press

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Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 512

View: 389

Our annual anthology of finalists and winners of the National Magazine Awards 2014 includes Max Chafkin's oral history of Apple from Fast Company, Joshua Davis's intimate portrait of tech pioneer John McAfee's personal and public breakdown from Wired; Kyle Dickman's haunting investigation into the preventable death of nineteen firemen battling an Arizona wildfire; and Ariel Levy's emotional account of extreme travel to a remote land—while pregnant—from The New Yorker. Other essays include Wright Thompson's bittersweet profile of Michael Jordan's fifty-something second act (ESPN the Magazine); Jean M. Twenge's revealing look at fertility myths and baby politics (The Atlantic); Janet Reitman's controversial study of the Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev (Rolling Stone); Luke Mogelson's harrowing experience accompanying asylum seekers on a potentially deadly sea voyage to Australia (New York Times Magazine); Lisa Miller's poignant report from Newtown, Connecticut, as the town tries to cope with the aftermath of one of the nation's worst mass shootings (New York); Emily Nussbaum's critiques of gender and politics on television (The New Yorker); and Witold Rybczynski's poetic engagement with modern architecture (Architect). The collection concludes with the award-winning poem "Elegies" by Kathleen Ossip (Poetry) and "The Embassy of Cambodia," a short story by Zadie Smith (The New Yorker).

Class Warfare

Inside the Fight to Fix America's Schools

Author: Steven Brill

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

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Category: Education

Page: 496

View: 187

In a reporting tour de force, award-winning journalist Steven Brill takes an uncompromising look at the adults who are fighting over America’s failure to educate its children—and points the way to reversing that failure. IN a reporting tour de force, award-winning journalist Steven Brill takes an uncompromising look at the adults who are fighting over America’s failure to educate its children—and points the way to reversing that failure. Brill’s vivid narrative—filled with unexpected twists and turns—takes us from the Oval Office, where President Obama signs off on an unprecedented plan that will infuriate the teachers’ unions because it offers billions to states that win an education reform “contest”; to boisterous assemblies, where parents join the fight over their children’s schools; to a Fifth Avenue apartment, where billionaires plan a secret fund to promote school reform; to a Colorado high school, where students who seemed destined to fail are instead propelled to college; to state capitols across the country, where school reformers hoping to win Obama’s “contest” push bills that would have been unimaginable a few years ago. It’s the story of an unlikely army—fed-up public school parents, Ivy League idealists, hedge-funders, civil rights activists, conservative Republicans, insurgent Democrats—squaring off against unions that the reformers claim are protecting a system that works for the adults but victimizes the children. Class Warfare is filled with extraordinary people taking extraordinary paths: a young woman who goes into teaching almost by accident, then becomes so talented and driven that fighting burnout becomes her biggest challenge; an antitrust lawyer who almost brought down Bill Gates’s Microsoft and now forms a partnership with Bill and Melinda Gates to overhaul New York’s schools; a naïve Princeton student who launches an army of school reformers with her senior thesis; a California teachers’ union lobbyist who becomes the mayor of Los Angeles and then the union’s prime antagonist; a stubborn young teacher who, as a child growing up on Park Avenue, had been assumed to be learning disabled but ends up co-founding the nation’s most successful charter schools; and an anguished national union leader who walks a tightrope between compromising enough to save her union and giving in so much that her members will throw her out. Brill not only takes us inside their roller-coaster battles, he also concludes with a surprising prescription for what it will take from both sides to put the American dream back in America’s schools.

No Logo 10th Anniversary Edition

Author: Naomi Klein

Publisher: Vintage Canada

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 528

View: 631

The tenth anniversary edition of the international bestseller with an updated introduction by Naomi Klein. In the last decade No Logo has become an international phenomenon. Equal parts journalistic expose, mall-rat memoir, and political and cultural analysis, it vividly documents the invasive economic practices and damaging social effects of the ruthless corporatism that characterizes many of our powerful institutions. As the world faces another depression, Naomi Klein's analysis of the branded world we all live in proves not only astonishingly prescient but more vital and timely than ever. No Logo became "the movement bible" that put the new grassroots resistance to corporate manipulation into clear perspective. It tells a story of rebellious rage and self-determination in the face of our branded world, calling for a more just, sustainable economic model and a new kind of proactive internationalism. Since her book The Shock Doctrine was published last year, Klein, now thirty-eight, has become the most visible and influential figure on the American left-what Howard Zinn and Noam Chomsky were thirty years ago.

Big Brother International

Formats, Critics and Publics

Author: Ernest Mathijs

Publisher: Wallflower Press

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Category: Performing Arts

Page: 261

View: 696

Since its inception, Big Brother has been versioned in over thirty countries and reached an estimated audience of over two billion. The first of its kind, this book considers the reception and impact of the series, and how different regions adopt the format to suit local cultural concerns and achieve commercial success. The book functions not only as a discussion of one single television program but also as a reflection on the medium's history and future, and its impact on popular culture.