A Source Book in Medieval Science

Author: Edward Grant

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 864

View: 330

Modern scholarship has exposed the intrinsic importance of medieval science and confirmed its role in preserving and transmitting Greek and Arabic achievements. This Source Book offers a rare opportunity to explore more than ten centuries of European scientific thought. In it are approximately 190 selections by about 85 authors, most of them from the Latin West. Nearly half of the selections appear here for the first time in any vernacular translation. The readings, a number of them complete treatises, have been chosen to represent "science" in a medieval rather than a modern sense. Thus, insofar as they are relevant to medieval science, selections have been drawn from works on alchemy, astrology, logic, and theology. Most of the book, however, reflects medieval understanding of, and achievements in, the mathematical, physical, and biological sciences. Critical commentary and annotation accompany the selections. An appendix contains brief biographiesof all authors. This book will be an indispensible resource for students and scholars in the history of science.

Essays on Galileo and the History and Philosophy of Science

Author: Stillman Drake

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 379

View: 913

This 3 volume collection includes 80 of the 130 papers published by Drake, most on Galileo but some on medieval and early modern science in general (principally mechanics). An essential supplement to Drake's translations and other books.

Robert of Chester’s Redaction of Euclid’s Elements, the so-called Adelard II Version

Author: H.L. Busard

Publisher: Birkhäuser

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 430

View: 330

The Latin "Version II", till now attributed to Adelard of Bath, is edited here for the first time. It was the most influential Euclid text in the Latin West in the 12th and 13th centuries. As the large number of manuscripts and the numerous quotations in other scientific and philosophical texts show, it was far better known than the three Euclid translations made from the Arabic in the 12th century (Adelard of Bath, version I; Hermann of Carinthia; Gerard of Cremona). Version II became the basis of later reworkings, in which the enunciations were taken over, but new proofs supplied; the most important text of this kind is the redaction made by Campanus in the late 1250s, which became the standard Latin "Euclid" in the later Middle Ages. The introduction deals with the questions of when and by whom version II was written. Since Marshall Clagett's fundamental article (1953) it has been generally accepted that version II is one of three Euclid texts attributable to Adelard of Bath. But a comparison of the text of version II with those of versions I and III yields little or no reason to assume that Adelard was the author of version II. Version II must have been written later than version I and before version III; its author was acquainted with Euclid texts of the Boethius tradition and with two of those transmitted from Arabic, version I (almost certainly by Adelard) and the version by Hermann of Carinthia.

An Anthology of Chinese Discourse on Translation (Volume 2)

From the Late Twelfth Century to 1800

Author: Martha Cheung

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 228

View: 905

Translation has a long history in China. Down the centuries translators, interpreters, Buddhist monks, Jesuit priests, Protestant missionaries, writers, historians, linguists, and even ministers and emperors have all written about translation, and from an amazing array of perspectives. This second volume of the seminal two-volume anthology spans the 13th century CE to the very beginning of the nineteenth century with an entry dated circa 1800. It deals mainly with the transmission of Western learning to China – a translation venture that changed the epistemological horizon and even the mindset of Chinese people. Also included are texts that address translation between Chinese and the languages of China's Central Asian neighbours, such as Manchu, which was to become of crucial importance in the Qing Dynasty. Comprising 28 passages, most of which are translated into English for the first time here, the anthology is the first major source book of its kind to appear in English. It features valuable primary material, and is essential reading for postgraduate students and researchers working in the areas of Translation, Translation Studies and Asian Studies.

Medieval Science, Technology, and Medicine

An Encyclopedia

Author: Thomas F. Glick

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 624

View: 265

Medieval Science, Technology, and Medicine details the whole scope of scientific knowledge in the medieval period in more than 300 A to Z entries. This resource discusses the research, application of knowledge, cultural and technology exchanges, experimentation, and achievements in the many disciplines related to science and technology. Coverage includes inventions, discoveries, concepts, places and fields of study, regions, and significant contributors to various fields of science. There are also entries on South-Central and East Asian science. This reference work provides an examination of medieval scientific tradition as well as an appreciation for the relationship between medieval science and the traditions it supplanted and those that replaced it. For a full list of entries, contributors, and more, visit the Routledge Encyclopedias of the Middle Ages website.