The Truth Behind a Series of Unfortunate Events

Eyeballs, Leeches, Hypnotism, and Orphans---Exploring Lemony Snicket's World

Author: Lois H. Gresh

Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 208

View: 700

The ultimate companion guide to A Series of Unfortunate Events--a must for fans of Lemony Snicket. A Series of Unfortunate Events is one of the most popular children's series in the world and will be a major motion picture starring Jim Carrey and Meryl Streep coming this 2004 holiday season. Now comes The Truth Behind a Series of Unfortunate Events, the ultimate companion guide to Lemony Snicket's fun and wildly successful novels. Digging beneath the surface, Lois Gresh uses science, history and little known facts to dig deep into the world of A Series of Unfortunate Events and provide young readers everywhere with how-to hints and tips, quizzes, cool anecdotes, fun facts and information on everything Lemony. Including: *Facts about handwriting analysis and forgery *Killer leeches, crabs, fungi and peppermint--all you need to know *The truth about hypnosis--and how to use it! *Real child inventors and their amazing inventions *How to build a telephone, a hot air balloon and an automatic harmonica *Are you as smart as Violet & Claus--the ultimate quiz *And much more! The ultimate renegade book report on A Series of Unfortunate Events, this reader's guide is a must for millions of young fans everywhere.

A Series of Unfortunate Events #7: The Vile Village

Author: Lemony Snicket

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 272

View: 551

NOW A NETFLIX ORIGINAL SERIES Dear Reader, You have undoubtedly picked up this book by mistake, so please put it down. Nobody in their right mind would read this particular book about the lives of Violet, Klaus, and Sunny Baudelaire on purpose, because each dismal moment of their stay in the village of V.F.D. has been faithfully and dreadfully recorded in these pages. I can think of no single reason why anyone would want to open a book containing such unpleasant matters as migrating crows, an angry mob, a newspaper headline, the arrest of innocent people, the Deluxe Cell, and some very strange hats. It is my solemn and sacred occupation to research each detail of the Baudelaire children's lives and write them all down, but you may prefer to do some other solemn and sacred thing, such as reading another book instead. With all due respect, Lemony Snicket

Crossing Textual Boundaries in International Children’s Literature

Author: Lance Weldy

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 545

View: 913

“As the first part of the title indicates, my interest in looking at intertextuality and transformation still maintains a prominent place throughout this book as well. If we believe that ‘no text is an island,’ then we will understand that the relationships between and within texts across the years become a fascinating place for academic inquiry. I included the word ‘boundaries’ into the title because we never get tired of voicing our opinions about texts which traverse relegated boundaries, such as genre or medium. Not only am I interested in discussing what these changes across boundaries mean socially, historically, and culturally, but also what they mean geographically, which accounts for the second part of my title. “I am very excited that this book will be placing even more emphasis on children’s literature in an international scene than my first book did, in the sense that I have added more scholars on an international level. I hesitate to list the nationalities of all of the contributors here because quite a few have themselves crossed international boundaries in different ways, by either studying abroad or finding permanent residency in foreign countries. Nevertheless, the writers have lived extensively in or identify as being from Australia, Canada, England, Finland, Germany, Greece, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Turkey, the United States of America, and Wales.” —Introduction

21st-century Gothic

Great Gothic Novels Since 2000

Author: Danel Olson

Publisher: Scarecrow Press

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 675

View: 497

Selected by a poll of more than 180 Gothic specialists, the fifty-three original works discussed in 21st-Century Gothic represent the most impressive Gothic novels written around the world between 2000-2010.

The Vile Village

Author: Lemony Snicket

Publisher: Egmont Books (UK)

ISBN:

Category: Brothers and sisters

Page: 256

View: 342

Why would anyone want to open a book containing such unpleasant matters as migrating crows, an angry mob, a newspaper headline, the arrest of innocent people, the Deluxe cell, and some very strange hats.

Popular Series Fiction for K-6 Readers

A Reading and Selection Guide

Author: Rebecca L. Thomas

Publisher: Libraries Unltd Incorporated

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 799

View: 436

Because of their popularity, books in series are great vehicles for fostering literacy among all types of readers, who are almost always adamant about reading every title in the series--in series order. Yet traditional information sources on children's and YA literature include very little about series fiction, so librarians often have difficulty managing this literature. This guide will be a rich resource and time-saver for librarians who work with children. It introduces users to the best and most popular fiction series of today, covering more than 1,000 series with over 10,000 titles, appropriate for elementary readers. Annotations also indicate series and titles accepted by some of the popular electronic reading programs (e.g., Accelerated Reading, Reading First). A numbered list of titles in the series follows.

Sykesville

Author: Bill Hall

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 686

A picturesque, little town located along the banks of the rolling Patapsco River, Sykesville, Maryland has had a long and distinctive history. Though not officially incorporated until 1904, Sykesville was first put on the map when, in 1831, the mighty Baltimore and Ohio Railroad sent its "Old Main Line" from the thriving metropolis of Baltimore to Point of Rocks in Frederick County, Maryland and traveled through the small town of Sykesville on its route. After that, tourism became an important industry in the town, as well-to-do Baltimoreans searched for a country refuge during the hot summer months. Sykesville, located in Carroll County and just 30 miles from Baltimore city, was the perfect spot to enjoy a relaxed and shady holiday. As Sykesville grew and changed over the years, many individuals, including Suzannah Warfield, Frank Brown, Wade Warfield, J.H. Fowble, E. Francis Baldwin, and Edwin Mellor, played important roles in the town's commercial development. But it is Sykesville's unique heritage, the great value placed on preserving that past by residents, and the resilient character of the community that has made Sykesville what it is today. Following a decline in the 1970s, the town experienced a rebirth fostered by the tenacious spirit of local officials and residents who strongly believed that the town could regain its past glory. Now, as one strolls along Sykesville's downtown streets, the past seems once again alive and the community's singular story is at the heart of it all.

A Series of Unfortunate Events Collection:

Author: Lemony Snicket

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 320

View: 544

NOW A NETFLIX ORIGINAL SERIES A Warning from the Publisher: Would you rather sprain your ankle, bruise your hip, and lose a toe to frostbite on the same day? Or would you rather have these accidents happen on three different days? This electronic collection of volumes seven through nine in A Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket is the e-equivalent of having three ghastly accidents right in a row. Contained here are such unpleasantries as kidnapping, disguise, murder, paperwork, another disguise, heart-shaped balloons, false allegations, stiletto heels, a shattered crystal ball, a cryptic map, an irritating song, and quite a few more disguises, all bundled together into a continuous barrage of horror and dismay. The more sensible approach would be to read The Vile Village, The Hostile Hospital, and The Carnivorous Carnival months or even years apart from one another, so you have time to recuperate from the misery each volume offers—or better yet, to turn your eyes away from Mr. Snicket's work and find an electronic experience that would cause you no distress whatsoever.