Birds in the Ancient World

Winged Words

Author: Jeremy Mynott

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Animals and civilization

Page: 480

View: 403

Birds played an important role in the ancient world: as indicators of time, weather, and seasons; as a resource for hunting, medicine, and farming; as pets and entertainment; as omens and messengers of the gods. Jeremy Mynott explores the similarities and surprising differences between ancient perceptions of the natural world and our own.

Birds in the Ancient World from A to Z

Author: W. Geoffrey Arnott

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 303

View: 117

Birds in the Ancient World from A to Z gathers together the ancient information available, listing all the names that ancient Greeks gave their birds and all their descriptions and analyses. W. Geoffrey Arnott identifies as many of them as possible in the light of modern ornithological studies. The ancient Greek bird names are transliterated into English script, and all that the ancients said about birds is presented in English. This book is accordingly the first complete discussion of ancient bird names that will be accessible to readers without ancient Greek. The only large-scale examination of ancient birds for seventy years, the book has an exhaustive bibliography (partly classical scholarship and partly ornithological) to encourage further study, and provides students and ornithologists with the definitive study of ancient birds.

A Bird in the Bush

A Social History of Birdwatching

Author: Stephen Moss

Publisher: Aurum Press Limited

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 384

View: 594

DIV ‘A wonderful book… beautifully told. He packs his pages with fascinating, often hilarious anecdotes and information. A social history which is a surprise and a delight’ Val Hennessy, Daily Mail Critic’s Choice Scholarly, authoritative and above all supremely readable, Stephen Moss’s book is the first to trace the fascinating history of how and why people have watched birds for pleasure, from the beginnings with Gilbert White in the eighteenth century through World War Two POWs watching birds from inside their prison camp all the way to today’s ‘twitchers’ with their bleeping pagers, driving hundreds of miles for a rare tick. ‘Thoroughly researched and well-written’ Mark Crocker, Guardian ‘Moss knows his subject intimately and writes about it with just the right mixture of affection and occasional quizzicality’ Jonathan Bate, Sunday Telegraph ‘It would be difficult to imagine anyone producing a more comprehensive, thoughtful, intelligent and entertaining examination of how people have watched birds at each point in history. In fact, it is one of the few books which might prove such compulsive reading that even a dedicated twitcher might forego a day in the field to stay at home to finish it’ Bryan Bland, Birding World /div

Sport in the Ancient World from A to Z

Author: Mark Golden

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 575

Sport in the Ancient World from A to Z covers an extraordinarily wide range of Greek and Roman sporting activities. Arranged in an easy-to-use dictionary format, this volume includes more than 700 entries discussing ancient athletes, festivals, important sites, equipment and concepts. The approach throughout is comprehensive yet succinct, with key topics, such as athletic festivals, chariot racing, prizes and the role of women receiving more detailed discussion. Each entry concludes with pointers to the most important sources of information, both ancient and modern. The places mentioned in the text are picked out on a useful map, and a timeline of significant developments and events is also included. Reliable, enjoyable, and up-to-date, this handy work of reference will suit readers from student level upwards.

Animals in the Ancient World from A to Z

Author: Kenneth F. Kitchell Jr.

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 262

View: 987

The ancient Greeks and Romans lived in a world teeming with animals. Animals were integral to ancient commerce, war, love, literature and art. Inside the city they were found as pets, pests, and parasites. They could be sacred, sacrificed, liminal, workers, or intruders from the wild. Beyond the city domesticated animals were herded and bred for profit and wild animals were hunted for pleasure and gain alike. Specialists like Aristotle, Aelian, Pliny and Seneca studied their anatomy and behavior. Geographers and travelers described new lands in terms of their animals. Animals are to be seen on every possible artistic medium, woven into cloth and inlaid into furniture. They are the subject of proverbs, oaths and dreams. Magicians, physicians and lovers turned to animals and their parts for their crafts. They paraded before kings, inhabited palaces, and entertained the poor in the arena. Quite literally, animals pervaded the ancient world from A-Z. In entries ranging from short to long, Kenneth Kitchell offers insight into this commonly overlooked world, covering representative and intriguing examples of mammals, reptiles, amphibians and invertebrates. Familiar animals such as the cow, dog, fox and donkey are treated along with more exotic animals such as the babirussa, pangolin, and dugong. The evidence adduced ranges from Minoan times to the Late Roman Empire and is taken from archaeology, ancient authors, inscriptions, papyri, coins, mosaics and all other artistic media. Whenever possible reasoned identifications are given for ancient animal names and the realities behind animal lore are brought forth. Why did the ancients think hippopotamuses practiced blood letting on themselves? How do you catch a monkey? Why were hyenas thought to be hermaphroditic? Was there really a vampire moth? Entries are accompanied by full citations to ancient authors and an extensive bibliography. Of use to Classics students and scholars, but written in a style designed to engage anyone interested in Greco-Roman antiquity, Animals in the Ancient World from A to Z reveals the extent and importance of the animal world to the ancient Greeks and Romans. It answers many questions, asks several more, and seeks to stimulate further research in this important field.

Thunderbirds

America's Living Legends of Giant Birds

Author: Mark A. Hall

Publisher: Cosimo, Inc.

ISBN:

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 206

View: 272

In this compelling compilation of evidence, researcher Mark Hall presents the case for terrifying, monstrous bird that has roamed our continents since the days of the ancient legends of the Thunderbird. Some very large birds are being sighted in the skies over North America. Described as an enormous black bird with a white ring around its long neck and a wingspan of up to 20 feet and more, this giant bird of prey has been sighted from Alaska, Canada, and the Pacific Northwest, and into the Midwest, Appalachia, and Pennsylvania. The accounts are puzzling and hard to believe yet eyewitnesses swear by what they saw. Evidence from around the world indicates that our ancestors knew and feared the bird, which can carry away small children and animals.

Medical Ethics in the Ancient World

Author: Paul J. Carrick

Publisher: Georgetown University Press

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 288

View: 268

In this book Paul Carrick charts the ancient Greek and Roman foundations of Western medical ethics. Surveying 1500 years of pre-Christian medical moral history, Carrick applies insights from ancient medical ethics to developments in contemporary medicine such as advance directives, gene therapy, physician-assisted suicide, abortion, and surrogate motherhood. He discusses such timeless issues as the social status of the physician; attitudes toward dying and death; and the relationship of medicine to philosophy, religion, and popular morality. Opinions of a wide range of ancient thinkers are consulted, including physicians, poets, philosophers, and patients. He also explores the puzzling question of Hippocrates' identity, analyzing not only the Hippocratic Oath but also the Father of Medicine's lesser-known works. Complete with chapter discussion questions, illustrations, a map, and appendices of ethical codes, Medical Ethics in the Ancient World will be useful in courses on the medical humanities, ancient philosophy, bioethics, comparative cultures, and the history of medicine. Accessible to both professionals and to those with little background in medical philosophy or ancient science, Carrick's book demonstrates that in the ancient world, as in our own postmodern age, physicians, philosophers, and patients embraced a diverse array of perspectives on the most fundamental questions of life and death.

The Photoshop Darkroom 2

Creative Digital Transformations

Author: Harold Davis

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Photography

Page: 208

View: 974

Award-winning photography/design team Harold and Phyllis Davis are back with a brand new volume in their new Photoshop Darkroom series. Picking up where their best-selling first book left off, The Photoshop Darkroom 2: Advanced Digital Post-Processing will show you everything you need to know to take your digital imaging skills to the next level. Great photographers know that the best images begin well before the shutter clicks, and certainly well before Photoshop boots up. Harold takes a step back, and shares his helpful tips for capturing the most compelling images possible by keeping in mind what type of post-processing you'll do before you start shooting. You'll also find complete coverage of important topics such as compositing, working with layers, and HDR. Packed with tons of eye-popping images which have won Harold national acclaim, this is a fantastic resource for photographers who want to think outside the box and create truly stunning artwork.

Prophecy in Early Christianity and the Ancient Mediterranean World

Author: David Edward Aune

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 522

View: 380

Aune's comprehensive study of early Christian prophecy includes a review of its antecedents (Greco-Roman oracles, ancient Israelite prophecy, prophecy in early Judaism), a discussion of Jesus as prophet, and analyses of Christian prophetic speeches from Paul to the middle of the second century A.D.

The Lagoon

How Aristotle Invented Science

Author: Armand Marie Leroi

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 512

View: 797

In the Eastern Aegean lies an island of forested hills and olive groves, with streams, marshes and a lagoon that nearly cuts the land in two. It was here, over two thousand years ago, that Aristotle came to work. Aristotle was the greatest philosopher of all time. Author of the Poetics, Politics and Metaphysics, his work looms over the history of Western thought. But he was also a biologist – the first. Aristotle explored the mysteries of the natural world. With the help of fishermen, hunters and farmers, he catalogued the animals in his world, dissected them, observed their behaviours and recorded how they lived, fed, and bred. In his great zoological treatise, Historia animalium, he described the mating habits of herons, the sexual incontinence of girls, the stomachs of snails, the sensitivity of sponges, the flippers of seals, the sounds of cicadas, the destructiveness of starfish, the dumbness of the deaf, the flatulence of elephants and the structure of the human heart. And then, in another dozen books, he explained it all. In The Lagoon, acclaimed biologist Armand Marie Leroi recovers Aristotle's science. He goes to Lesbos to see the creatures that Aristotle saw, where he saw them, and explores the Philosopher's deep ideas and inspired guesses – as well as the things that he got wildly wrong. Leroi shows how Aristotle's science is deeply intertwined with his philosophical system and how modern science even now bears the imprint of its inventor.