Big Data, Little Data, No Data

Scholarship in the Networked World

Author: Christine L. Borgman

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 416

View: 870

"Big Data" is on the covers of Science, Nature, the Economist, and Wired magazines, on the front pages of the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times. But despite the media hyperbole, as Christine Borgman points out in this examination of data and scholarly research, having the right data is usually better than having more data; little data can be just as valuable as big data. In many cases, there are no data -- because relevant data don't exist, cannot be found, or are not available. Moreover, data sharing is difficult, incentives to do so are minimal, and data practices vary widely across disciplines.Borgman, an often-cited authority on scholarly communication, argues that data have no value or meaning in isolation; they exist within a knowledge infrastructure -- an ecology of people, practices, technologies, institutions, material objects, and relationships. After laying out the premises of her investigation -- six "provocations" meant to inspire discussion about the uses of data in scholarship -- Borgman offers case studies of data practices in the sciences, the social sciences, and the humanities, and then considers the implications of her findings for scholarly practice and research policy. To manage and exploit data over the long term, Borgman argues, requires massive investment in knowledge infrastructures; at stake is the future of scholarship.

Data Scholarship

A BIT of Big Data, Little Data, No Data

Author: Christine L. Borgman

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 23

View: 781

Despite the media hyperbole about "Big Data," having the right data is usually better than having more data; little data can be just as valuable as big data. This BIT examines the complex set of relationships between data and scholarly research. In it, Christine Borgman, an often-cited authority on scholarly communication, looks at, among other things, knowledge infrastructures, social and technical aspects of digital scholarship, collaboration and community, open access publishing, and open data.

Big Data

Scholarship in the Networked World. little data, no data

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Communication in learning and scholarship -- Technological innovations

Page: 383

View: 453

All Data Are Local

Thinking Critically in a Data-Driven Society

Author: Yanni Alexander Loukissas

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 272

View: 532

How to analyze data settings rather than data sets, acknowledging the meaning-making power of the local. In our data-driven society, it is too easy to assume the transparency of data. Instead, Yanni Loukissas argues in All Data Are Local, we should approach data sets with an awareness that data are created by humans and their dutiful machines, at a time, in a place, with the instruments at hand, for audiences that are conditioned to receive them. The term data set implies something discrete, complete, and portable, but it is none of those things. Examining a series of data sources important for understanding the state of public life in the United States—Harvard's Arnold Arboretum, the Digital Public Library of America, UCLA's Television News Archive, and the real estate marketplace Zillow—Loukissas shows us how to analyze data settings rather than data sets. Loukissas sets out six principles: all data are local; data have complex attachments to place; data are collected from heterogeneous sources; data and algorithms are inextricably entangled; interfaces recontextualize data; and data are indexes to local knowledge. He then provides a set of practical guidelines to follow. To make his argument, Loukissas employs a combination of qualitative research on data cultures and exploratory data visualizations. Rebutting the “myth of digital universalism,” Loukissas reminds us of the meaning-making power of the local.

Big Data for Qualitative Research

Author: Kathy A. Mills

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 78

View: 527

Big Data for Qualitative Research covers everything small data researchers need to know about big data, from the potentials of big data analytics to its methodological and ethical challenges. The data that we generate in everyday life is now digitally mediated, stored, and analyzed by web sites, companies, institutions, and governments. Big data is large volume, rapidly generated, digitally encoded information that is often related to other networked data, and can provide valuable evidence for study of phenomena. This book explores the potentials of qualitative methods and analysis for big data, including text mining, sentiment analysis, information and data visualization, netnography, follow-the-thing methods, mobile research methods, multimodal analysis, and rhythmanalysis. It debates new concerns about ethics, privacy, and dataveillance for big data qualitative researchers. This book is essential reading for those who do qualitative and mixed methods research, and are curious, excited, or even skeptical about big data and what it means for future research. Now is the time for researchers to understand, debate, and envisage the new possibilities and challenges of the rapidly developing and dynamic field of big data from the vantage point of the qualitative researcher.

The Politics and Policies of Big Data

Big Data, Big Brother?

Author: Ann Rudinow Sætnan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 358

View: 207

Big Data, gathered together and re-analysed, can be used to form endless variations of our persons - so-called ‘data doubles’. Whilst never a precise portrayal of who we are, they unarguably contain glimpses of details about us that, when deployed into various routines (such as management, policing and advertising) can affect us in many ways. How are we to deal with Big Data? When is it beneficial to us? When is it harmful? How might we regulate it? Offering careful and critical analyses, this timely volume aims to broaden well-informed, unprejudiced discourse, focusing on: the tenets of Big Data, the politics of governance and regulation; and Big Data practices, performance and resistance. An interdisciplinary volume, The Politics of Big Data will appeal to undergraduate and postgraduate students, as well as postdoctoral and senior researchers interested in fields such as Technology, Politics and Surveillance.

Big Data at Work

Dispelling the Myths, Uncovering the Opportunities

Author: Thomas Davenport

Publisher: Harvard Business Review Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 240

View: 414

Go ahead, be skeptical about big data. The author was—at first. When the term “big data” first came on the scene, bestselling author Tom Davenport (Competing on Analytics, Analytics at Work) thought it was just another example of technology hype. But his research in the years that followed changed his mind. Now, in clear, conversational language, Davenport explains what big data means—and why everyone in business needs to know about it. Big Data at Work covers all the bases: what big data means from a technical, consumer, and management perspective; what its opportunities and costs are; where it can have real business impact; and which aspects of this hot topic have been oversold. This book will help you understand: • Why big data is important to you and your organization • What technology you need to manage it • How big data could change your job, your company, and your industry • How to hire, rent, or develop the kinds of people who make big data work • The key success factors in implementing any big data project • How big data is leading to a new approach to managing analytics With dozens of company examples, including UPS, GE, Amazon, United Healthcare, Citigroup, and many others, this book will help you seize all opportunities—from improving decisions, products, and services to strengthening customer relationships. It will show you how to put big data to work in your own organization so that you too can harness the power of this ever-evolving new resource.

Life After Google

The Fall of Big Data and the Rise of the Blockchain Economy

Author: George Gilder

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 256

View: 851

“Google’s algorithms assume the world’s future is nothing more than the next moment in a random process. George Gilder shows how deep this assumption goes, what motivates people to make it, and why it’s wrong: the future depends on human action.” — Peter Thiel, founder of PayPal and Palantir Technologies and author of Zero to One: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future. “If you want to be clued in to the unfolding future, then you have come to the right place. For decades, George Gilder has been the undisputed oracle of technology’s future. Are giant companies like Google, Amazon, and Facebook the unstoppable monopolistic juggernauts that they seem, or are they dysfunctional giants about to be toppled by tech-savvy, entrepreneurial college dropouts?” — Nick Tredennick, Ph.D., Chief Scientist, QuickSilver Technolog Silicon Valley’s Nervous Breakdown The Age of Google, built on big data and machine intelligence, has been an awesome era. But it’s coming to an end. In Life after Google, George Gilder—the peerless visionary of technology and culture—explains why Silicon Valley is suffering a nervous breakdown and what to expect as the post-Google age dawns. Google’s astonishing ability to “search and sort” attracts the entire world to its search engine and countless other goodies—videos, maps, email, calendars….And everything it offers is free, or so it seems. Instead of paying directly, users submit to advertising. The system of “aggregate and advertise” works—for a while—if you control an empire of data centers, but a market without prices strangles entrepreneurship and turns the Internet into a wasteland of ads. The crisis is not just economic. Even as advances in artificial intelligence induce delusions of omnipotence and transcendence, Silicon Valley has pretty much given up on security. The Internet firewalls supposedly protecting all those passwords and personal information have proved hopelessly permeable. The crisis cannot be solved within the current computer and network architecture. The future lies with the “cryptocosm”—the new architecture of the blockchain and its derivatives. Enabling cryptocurrencies such as bitcoin and ether, NEO and Hashgraph, it will provide the Internet a secure global payments system, ending the aggregate-and-advertise Age of Google. Silicon Valley, long dominated by a few giants, faces a “great unbundling,” which will disperse computer power and commerce and transform the economy and the Internet. Life after Google is almost here. For fans of "Wealth and Poverty," "Knoweldge and Power," and "The Scandal of Money."

Big Data, Big Dupe

A Little Book about a Big Bunch of Nonsense

Author: Stephen Few

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 96

View: 601

"Big Data, Big Dupe" is a little book about a big bunch of nonsense. The story of David and Goliath inspires us to hope that something little, when armed with truth, can topple something big that is a lie. This is the author's hope. While others have written about the dangers of Big Data, Stephen Few reveals the deceit that belies its illusory nature. If "data is the new oil," Big Data is the new snake oil. It isn't real. It's a marketing campaign that has distracted us for years from the real and important work of deriving value from data.

Win with Advanced Business Analytics

Creating Business Value from Your Data

Author: Jean-Paul Isson

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 416

View: 360

Plain English guidance for strategic business analytics and bigdata implementation In today's challenging economy, business analytics and big datahave become more and more ubiquitous. While some businesses don'teven know where to start, others are struggling to move from beyondbasic reporting. In some instances management and executives do notsee the value of analytics or have a clear understanding ofbusiness analytics vision mandate and benefits. Win withAdvanced Analytics focuses on integrating multiple types ofintelligence, such as web analytics, customer feedback, competitiveintelligence, customer behavior, and industry intelligence intoyour business practice. Provides the essential concept and framework to implementbusiness analytics Written clearly for a nontechnical audience Filled with case studies across a variety of industries Uniquely focuses on integrating multiple types of big dataintelligence into your business Companies now operate on a global scale and are inundated with alarge volume of data from multiple locations and sources: B2B data,B2C data, traffic data, transactional data, third party vendordata, macroeconomic data, etc. Packed with case studies frommultiple countries across a variety of industries, Win withAdvanced Analytics provides a comprehensive framework andapplications of how to leverage business analytics/big data tooutpace the competition.