Beowulf's Ecstatic Trance Magic

Accessing the Archaic Powers of the Universal Mind

Author: Nicholas E. Brink

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 256

View: 677

Use ecstatic trance to journey to the time of Beowulf and learn first hand the ancient magic of the early Nordic people • Reveals a hidden side to the epic of Beowulf through the perspective of Queen Wealhtheow • Shows how Grendel respected and would not harm Queen Wealhtheow because she practiced the ancient magic of the Mother Goddess Freyja • Explains how the magic practices of Queen Wealhtheow provide a blueprint for our emergence from the warlike nature of the past millennia into a time of peace and compassion for our Great Mother Earth Using the altered state of ecstatic trance to access the memories of the Universal Mind, Nicholas Brink takes us back to ancient Scandinavia, to the time of the epic of Beowulf, the oldest piece of literature written in the English language. Sharing his ecstatic trance techniques along the way, his journey allows us to re-experience the life and shamanic practices of Queen Wealhtheow, the wife of King Hrothgar, the king rescued by Beowulf from the torment of the monster Grendel. Revealing a hidden side to the epic of Beowulf, Brink details how Grendel respected and would not harm Queen Wealhtheow and her teacher Vanadisdottir, a priestess of the goddess Freyja, for they practiced the ancient magic of the earlier hunter-gatherer era when the Great Mother Earth was worshipped. In the time of the queen the peaceful and compassionate traditions of this era were becoming forgotten, succumbing to settlements, kingdoms, and territorial disputes. We gain first-person experience of Wealhtheow and Vanadisdottir’s veneration of the Great Mother and the ancient magic of the early Nordic people as practiced by the seiðr workers, seers, and spirit travelers, the shamans of the time. These practices include divination through the goddess Freyr, contacting Bear spirits, and spirit journeying to various realms. As we experience our own time of transition and turmoil much like that of Beowulf’s time, Nicholas Brink reveals how the original magic of our ancestors, as practiced by Queen Wealhtheow, provides a blueprint for our emergence from the warlike nature of the past into a time of peace and compassion for our Great Mother Earth.

Beowulf's Ecstatic Trance Magic

Accessing the Archaic Powers of the Universal Mind

Author: Nicholas E. Brink, Ph.D.

Publisher: Inner Traditions / Bear & Co

ISBN:

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 256

View: 282

Use ecstatic trance to journey to the time of Beowulf and learn first hand the ancient magic of the early Nordic people • Reveals a hidden side to the epic of Beowulf through the perspective of Queen Wealhtheow • Shows how Grendel respected and would not harm Queen Wealhtheow because she practiced the ancient magic of the Mother Goddess Freyja • Explains how the magic practices of Queen Wealhtheow provide a blueprint for our emergence from the warlike nature of the past millennia into a time of peace and compassion for our Great Mother Earth Using the altered state of ecstatic trance to access the memories of the Universal Mind, Nicholas Brink takes us back to ancient Scandinavia, to the time of the epic of Beowulf, the oldest piece of literature written in the English language. Sharing his ecstatic trance techniques along the way, his journey allows us to re-experience the life and shamanic practices of Queen Wealhtheow, the wife of King Hrothgar, the king rescued by Beowulf from the torment of the monster Grendel. Revealing a hidden side to the epic of Beowulf, Brink details how Grendel respected and would not harm Queen Wealhtheow and her teacher Vanadisdottir, a priestess of the goddess Freyja, for they practiced the ancient magic of the earlier hunter-gatherer era when the Great Mother Earth was worshipped. In the time of the queen the peaceful and compassionate traditions of this era were becoming forgotten, succumbing to settlements, kingdoms, and territorial disputes. We gain first-person experience of Wealhtheow and Vanadisdottir’s veneration of the Great Mother and the ancient magic of the early Nordic people as practiced by the seiðr workers, seers, and spirit travelers, the shamans of the time. These practices include divination through the goddess Freyr, contacting Bear spirits, and spirit journeying to various realms. As we experience our own time of transition and turmoil much like that of Beowulf’s time, Nicholas Brink reveals how the original magic of our ancestors, as practiced by Queen Wealhtheow, provides a blueprint for our emergence from the warlike nature of the past into a time of peace and compassion for our Great Mother Earth.

Applying the Constructivist Approach to Cognitive Therapy

Resolving the Unconscious Past

Author: Nicholas E. Brink

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 130

View: 806

Applying the Constructivist Approach to Cognitive Therapy goes beyond the traditional objectivist approach of uncovering the what of a client’s dysfunctional thinking by helping client and therapist understand why the client thinks in a dysfunctional manner. This unique work demonstrates how this thinking can be uncovered through dreamwork, analytic hypnotherapy, ecstatic trance, and other spontaneous trance experiences such as the use of imagination, free association, and guided imagery. Utilizing hypnotherapeutic techniques, the author shows how clients can reframe these thoughts to achieve a healthier, more functional way of thinking. Replete with case studies and practical guidance, this text will help therapists take clients beyond a simple resolution of their problems and offer an avenue to greater personal growth, maturity, and creativity.

Ecstatic Soul Retrieval

Shamanism and Psychotherapy

Author: Nicholas E. Brink

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 208

View: 526

A guide to integrating ecstatic trance, soul retrieval, and psychotherapy to overcome emotional challenges and deepen your connection to all life on Mother Earth • Describes the methodologies of ecstatic trance and psychotherapy, explaining how they can be integrated in a way that feels familiar and safe • Illustrates five ecstatic postures for strengthening identity, uncovering the root of suffering, and aligning with a spirit guide • Includes three in-depth case studies to illustrate how to override negative beliefs and habits and experience oneness with the Earth and all life Sharing the wisdom of shamanic healing, Nicholas Brink creates an accessible link between psychotherapy and the ritualized use of ecstatic trance postures. He explains how ecstatic trance triggers the imagery that allows us to override negative beliefs and retrieve the lost innocence of the soul. He shows us how to broaden healing beyond the resolution of individual emotional and behavioral issues to create harmony in family, community, society, and the world around us. Integrating cognitive behavioral therapy, narrative therapy, and dream analysis, the author provides a unique model for tapping into the universal mind in a way that feels familiar and safe. He illustrates five ecstatic postures for emotional and spiritual growth, moving from finding a place of relaxation in which to strengthen your sense of self to the soul retrieval experience, which leads to the death of dysfunctional beliefs and restoration of your original innocence. The author shows how spirit guides can support us as we achieve the spiritual consciousness of the shaman and recognize the interdependence of all cultures and all living things on the planet. Using three in-depth case studies, Brink demonstrates how these practices can be used to resolve common psychological issues such as agoraphobia, panic attacks, irrational anger, mood swings, obsessive behaviors, and control issues. Allowing you to find your inner shaman--your ability to heal yourself and, in turn, to contribute to the healing of all life on our planet--ecstatic soul retrieval helps you overcome emotional and behavioral problems, override negative beliefs, and experience oneness with all life on Mother Earth.

Pagan Magic of the Northern Tradition

Customs, Rites, and Ceremonies

Author: Nigel Pennick

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 352

View: 715

A practical guide to the magical history, customs, and practices of pre-Christian Northern Europe • Details the everyday magic of the Northern Tradition, including household magic, protection spells, and the significance of the days of the week • Explores direct natural magic, such as shapeshifting and soul travel, and talismanic or sigil magic, including runes and rituals to unlock the power of crafted objects • Explains how many of these customs continue to the present day In the pre-Christian societies of Northern Europe, magic was embedded in the practical skills of everyday life. Everything in Nature was ensouled with an inner spirit, as was anything made by hand. People believed in magic because it worked and because it was part of the functionality of their day-to-day lives. Many of these practical observances and customs continue to the present day as rural traditions, folk customs, household magic, and celebrations of the high and holy days of the calendar. Exploring the magical pagan traditions of the people now called Celtic, Germanic, Scandinavian, Slavonic, and Baltic, Nigel Pennick examines the underlying principle of the Northern Tradition--the concept of Wyrd--and how it empowers the arts of operative magic, such as direct natural magic and talismanic or sigil magic. Through direct natural magic, individuals can shape shift, journey out of the body, or send one of their three souls (fylgia or “fetch”) ahead of them. Sigil magic involves the powers contained in objects, which can be channeled after the appropriate ritual. Runes are the most powerful sigils in the Northern Tradition and were used to ward off illness, danger, hostile magic, and malevolent spirits. Emphasizing the importance of the cycles of Nature to the tradition, Pennick explores the eightfold sun dials and the four ways the solar year is defined. He looks at the days of the week and their symbolic association with different deities as well as why particular acts are performed on certain days and what the customary lucky and unlucky days are. He also examines sacred spaces, household magic, protection spells, and the role of music in the Northern Tradition. Explaining all the traditional holidays and activities necessary to honor them, Pennick shows how anyone can participate authentically in the magic of the Northern Tradition if they take care to do things properly, with respect, and on the right day.

Norse Goddess Magic

Trancework, Mythology, and Ritual

Author: Alice Karlsdóttir

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 256

View: 950

A practical guide to the magic of the feminine side of the Norse pantheon • Provides invocations and rituals to call each goddess forth for personal and group spirit work • Details the author’s trancework to discover the personalities and powers of Frigg the Allmother, wife of Odin, and the 12 lesser-known Aesir goddesses associated with her • Offers a comprehensive guide to tranceworking to connect with the deities Combining traditional research on folklore and the Eddas with trancework and meditation techniques, Alice Karlsdóttir was able to rediscover the feminine side of the Norse pantheon and assemble working knowledge of 13 Norse goddesses for both group ritual and personal spirit work. Detailing her trancework journeys to connect with the goddesses, the author reveals the long-lost personalities and powers of each deity. She explores the Norse goddess Frigg the Allmother, wife of Odin, along with the 12 Asynjur, or Aesir goddesses, associated with her, such as Sjofn the peacemaker, Eir the Healer, and Vor the Wisewoman. She shares their appearances in the Eddas and Germanic mythology and explains the meanings of their names, their relationships to each other, and their connections to the roles of women in Old Norse society. She provides detailed instructions for invocations and rituals to call each goddess forth for personal and group spirit work. She also offers a comprehensive guide to ritual tranceworking to allow anyone to directly experience deities and spiritual beings and develop spirit-work relationships with them.

Loki's Children

A Healing Story of Antiquity, Shamanism and Psychotherapy

Author: Nicholas E. Brink

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 318

View: 709

Two tools of psychotherapy to access the unconscious mind are clinical hypnosis and dreamwork. Recently added to these tools is ecstatic trance as used by the hunting and gathering shamans, both ancient and contemporary, ways that open the doors to the hidden stories or narratives that need to be faced for healing the emotional struggles of life. Many of the myths that came from the collective dreams and trance experiences of the ancients are healing stories. One, the Nordic myth of Loki's Children, provides direction in the healing process for many of life's problems, the map for the healing journeys of three clients using their narratives from dreams, hypnosis, and ecstatic trance. The three children sired by the trickster god are dangerous monsters that threaten the Nordic pantheon of deities: Jormungand, a poison-spitting serpent, is thrown into the sea where it grows to encircle the earth to hold its tail in its mouth. The second child, Hel, whose body is half rotten with decay is thrown into the underworld where she suffers with remorse for the guilt of those who died dishonorably. The third child, Fenrir, a wolf of tremendous size who continually grows, is our obsessive thoughts and worries. This map of the psychotherapeutic journey to overcome this fear, guilt, and obsessive worry takes us into the unconscious mind and beyond into the universal mind, the world of the spirits for healing and personal growth. Each client finds the way to overcome these monsters to find innocence with the rebirth of Odin's beloved son Baldr.

Shamanism and Old English Poetry

Author: Stephen O. Glosecki

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 257

View: 308

Tales on two monumental labors: to define shamanism and to show that it underlies some Anglo-Saxon poetry. Applying anthropological studies of tribal peoples in modern times to intensive examinations of Beowulf, metrical charms, and decorative art, Glasecki finds not living shamanism, but embedded t

Novel Talking

The Autotelic Otiose

Author: Michael H. Riley

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 284

View: 268

Novel Talking; or, The Autotelic Otiose A Menippean satire on television and marijuana. Dialogues and fantasy futures by a Shakespeare scholar concerning the impact of modern media and recreational chemicals on post-literate Bicentennial America. A Review of Novel Talking It is one thing for a temporarily retired academic to retreat to the woods, deliberately regress to personal and cultural adolescence, and dream in silent solitude about stand-up classroom verbal eloquence; but it is another when these dreams become a theory of human nature going all the way back to the primitive Siberian shaman and are urged on us as a description of modern western man. It does not help much that the author, a teacher of Shakespeare, acknowledges each irony in turn: social science theory is nothing but autobiography, writing is a dream of speech, solitude creates fantasy company. Each admitted irony, each existential paradox wafts this quixotic author further from his mundane chore---to write well. To be sure, the author agrees. Marijuana, he says, generates first draft or "epiphanic" thought, and the book is thus a composition text, an illustration of pride and flaw. "If indolence has been the hallmark of my execution (for quite a while, in several areas) should I not make it the focus of my educational effort?" Thus will the "stone soup" of this Peter Pan "preserve", if not communicate, the "creative vision," which he defines as "an idealistic blurring of forms which allows autobiography, cultural history, ethical paradigm and ecstatic witness to reveal common roots in ego and fiction." In method and subject (roughly, being stoned and watching the tube) Novel Talking is adolescent pastoral, aware of itself as an idyll. It is a survey of the four seasonal literary modes, comedy, tragedy, irony and romance, each presented with a behavioral analogue from the social sciences,. The pattern for tragedy: the western body-soul dualism derives from the cultural practice of swaddling. Its first articulation is by the ancient shaman, who performs an imitation of a wrapped (rapt) memory of an imagined unwrapped act, a magic spirit flight from the body, an ineffable claim convincing enough to arouse, sustain and focus to his profit the fight-flight tension (the mingled rage and ridicule) of the gathering within the sound of his voice. In further discussion the swaddle itself becomes an analogue for various contemporary sedentary recreational states, including television and chemical euphoria, which are contrasted with group ritual behavior in order to suggest ways to deal with emerging national patterns of "domestic equality and mutual grooming." This is a rather heavy argument to be founded, as the author says, only on cultural generalizations and, more importantly, on purely autobiographical analogies. He further asserts that it is only because of the fashion of the times that he speaks in this way. He is only a Boy Scout, an acolyte, only a shaman stoned. He has a theory of gentility, of manners, and God is a personal laugh track. He is looking for work. We seek, he says, only what we lack. At the college level of this author's prime pedagogic fantasy (only one of several) this search translates as a form of residential literary and critical counseling ("minor arbitration, general assaying, duck rowing"), a kind of WASP male Uncle Tomming or intellectual groping for pay that can only be imagined, perhaps, after three years alone in the woods. It's going to have to be a no-frills fantasy, this academic niche, because the writing of this book will compel poetic justice, academic logic and Dame Fortune to all insist that its author teach composition for a living. And that would be, after all, the best framework for coaching the logical and literary mise-en-scene of a gathering of shamen. Heaven help his students. &nbs