Beowulf (Bilingual Edition)

Author: Seamus Heaney

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN:

Category: Poetry

Page: 213

View: 171

Presents a new translation of the Anglo-Saxon epic chronicling the heroic adventures of Beowulf, the Scandinavian warrior who saves his people from the ravages of the monster Grendel and Grendel's mother.

Beowulf (Bilingual Edition)

Author: Seamus Heaney

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN:

Category: Poetry

Page: 256

View: 488

New York Times bestseller and winner of the Whitbread Award. Composed toward the end of the first millennium, Beowulf is the elegiac narrative of the adventures of Beowulf, a Scandinavian hero who saves the Danes from the seemingly invincible monster Grendel and, later, from Grendel's mother. He then returns to his own country and dies in old age in a vivid fight against a dragon. The poem is about encountering the monstrous, defeating it, and then having to live on in the exhausted aftermath. In the contours of this story, at once remote and uncannily familiar at the beginning of the twenty-first century, Nobel laureate Seamus Heaney finds a resonance that summons power to the poetry from deep beneath its surface. Drawn to what he has called the "four-squareness of the utterance" in ?Beowulf? and its immense emotional credibility, Heaney gives these epic qualities new and convincing reality for the contemporary reader.

Beowulf: complete bilingual edition including the original anglo-saxon edition + 3 modern english translations + an extensive study of the poem + footnotes, index and alphabetical glossary

Author: Anonymous

Publisher: e-artnow

ISBN:

Category: Poetry

Page: 256

View: 415

This carefully crafted ebook: “Beowulf: complete bilingual edition including the original anglo-saxon edition + 3 modern english translations + an extensive study of the poem + footnotes, index and alphabetical glossary” contains 5 books in one volume and is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. Beowulf is the conventional title of an Old English heroic epic poem consisting of 3182 alliterative long lines, set in Scandinavia, commonly cited as one of the most important works of Anglo-Saxon literature. It survives in a single manuscript known as the Nowell Codex. Its composition by an anonymous Anglo-Saxon poet is dated between the 8th and the early 11th century. In 1731, the manuscript was badly damaged by a fire that swept through a building housing a collection of Medieval manuscripts assembled by Sir Robert Bruce Cotton. The poem's existence for its first seven centuries or so made no impression on writers and scholars, and besides a brief mention in a 1705 catalogue by Humfrey Wanley it was not studied until the end of the eighteenth century, and not published in its entirety until the 1815 edition prepared by the Icelandic-Danish scholar Grímur Jónsson Thorkelin. In the poem, Beowulf, a hero of the Geats in Scandinavia, comes to the help of Hroðgar, the king of the Danes, whose mead hall (in Heorot) has been under attack by a monster known as Grendel. After Beowulf slays him, Grendel's mother attacks the hall and is then also defeated. Victorious, Beowulf goes home to Geatland in Sweden and later becomes king of the Geats. After a period of fifty years has passed, Beowulf defeats a dragon, but is fatally wounded in the battle. After his death, his attendants bury him in a tumulus, a burial mound, in Geatland. The numerous different translations and interpretations of Beowulf turn this monumental work into a challenge for the reader. This ebook contains 5 books in one ebook: 1) By Anonymous, edited by Alfred John Wyatt: "Beowulf". This is the anglo-saxon original version based on the autotypes (facsimilies) in Julius Zupitza’s edition of 1882. 2) By John Lesslie Hall: "Beowulf - An Anglo-Saxon Epic Poem". This is a 1892 translation of Beowulf into modern english with notes and comments. 3) By William Morris: "The Tale of Beowulf - Sometime King of the Folk of the Weder Geats". This is an 1895 translation of Beowulf into modern english with notes and comments. 4) By: Francis Barton Gummere: "Beowulf". This is a 1910 translation of Beowulf into modern english , with notes and comments. 5) By: Raymond Wilson Chambers: "Beowulf - An Introduction to the Study of the Poem with a Discussion of the Stories of Offa and Finn".

Beowulf: complete bilingual edition including the original anglo-saxon edition + 3 modern english translations + an extensive study of the poem + footnotes, index and alphabetical glossary

Author: Anonymous

Publisher: e-artnow

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 256

View: 153

This carefully crafted ebook: "Beowulf: complete bilingual edition including the original anglo-saxon edition + 3 modern english translations + an extensive study of the poem + footnotes, index and alphabetical glossary" contains 5 books in one volume and is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. Beowulf is the conventional title of an Old English heroic epic poem consisting of 3182 alliterative long lines, set in Scandinavia, commonly cited as one of the most important works of Anglo-Saxon literature. It survives in a single manuscript known as the Nowell Codex. Its composition by an anonymous Anglo-Saxon poet is dated between the 8th and the early 11th century. In 1731, the manuscript was badly damaged by a fire that swept through a building housing a collection of Medieval manuscripts assembled by Sir Robert Bruce Cotton. The poem's existence for its first seven centuries or so made no impression on writers and scholars, and besides a brief mention in a 1705 catalogue by Humfrey Wanley it was not studied until the end of the eighteenth century, and not published in its entirety until the 1815 edition prepared by the Icelandic-Danish scholar Grímur Jónsson Thorkelin. In the poem, Beowulf, a hero of the Geats in Scandinavia, comes to the help of Hroðgar, the king of the Danes, whose mead hall (in Heorot) has been under attack by a monster known as Grendel. After Beowulf slays him, Grendel's mother attacks the hall and is then also defeated. Victorious, Beowulf goes home to Geatland in Sweden and later becomes king of the Geats. After a period of fifty years has passed, Beowulf defeats a dragon, but is fatally wounded in the battle. After his death, his attendants bury him in a tumulus, a burial mound, in Geatland. The numerous different translations and interpretations of Beowulf turn this monumental work into a challenge for the reader.

Narrative Pulse of Beowulf

Arrivals and Departures

Author: John M Hill

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 144

View: 362

One of the most consistent critiques levelled against Beowulf is that it lacks a steady narrative advance and that its numerous digressions tend to complicate if not halt the poem's movement. As those passages often look backward or far ahead in narrative time, they seem to transform the poem into a meditative pastiche. The Narrative Pulse of Beowulf counters this assertion, examining Beowulf as a social drama with a strong, forward-moving narrative momentum. John M. Hill discerns a distinctive 'narrative pulse' arising out of the poem's many scenes of arrival and departure. He argues that such scenes, far from being fixed or 'type' scenes, are socially dramatic and a key to understanding the structural density of the poem. Bolstering his analysis with a strong understanding of the epic, Hill looks at Beowulf in relation to other stories such as The Odyssey and The Iliad, epics that, though they may appear to have a certain narrative elasticity, use scenes of arrival and departure to create a cohesive social world in which stories unfold. As a new and comprehensive study of one of the most important Old English texts, The Narrative Pulse of Beowulf sheds new light on this famous poem and the epic tradition itself.

Beowulf

An Illustrated Edition

Author: John D. Niles

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 260

View: 333

A best-selling translation of the classic epic is complemented by lavish photographs and illustrations of period relics, from Viking warships and chain mail suits to spearheads and a reconstruction of the Great Hall. Original. 30,000 first printing.

The Earliest English Poems

A Bilingual Edition

Author: Michael J. Alexander

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: Anglo-Saxon poetry (Collections)

Page: 218

View: 399

The Medieval Motion Picture

The Politics of Adaptation

Author: A. Johnston

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 233

View: 248

Providing new and challenging ways of understanding the medieval in the modern and vice versa, this volume highlights how medieval aesthetic experience breathes life into contemporary cinema. Engaging with the subject of time and temporality, the essays examine the politics of adaptation and our contemporary entanglement with the medieval.

The Cambridge Companion to Old English Literature

Author: Malcolm Godden

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 355

View: 910

This updated edition has been thoroughly revised to take account of recent scholarship and includes five new chapters.

Decadences - Morality and Aesthetics in British Literature

Second, Revised and Expanded Edition

Author: Paul Fox

Publisher: ibidem-Verlag / ibidem Press

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 430

View: 793

This revised and expanded volume examines the intersections of aesthetics and morality and asks what Decadence means to art and society at various moments in British literature. As time passes, the definition of what it takes to be D/decadent changes. The decline from a higher standard, social malaise, aesthetic ennui – all these ideas presume certain facts about the past, the present, and the linear nature of time itself. To reject the past as a given, and to relish the subtleties of present nuance, is the beginning of Decadence. The conflict underlying the contributions to this collection is that of society's moral contempt vis-a-vis the focus on the fleeting present on part of the purportedly decadent artists; who in turn thought the truly decadent to be the stranglehold society maintained on individual interpretation and the interpretation of oneself.