Beatific Vision

Author: Jordan Spiece

Publisher: AuthorHouse

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 294

View: 140

Giuseppe Morreti, commander of an elite branch of the Vatican military known as the Milvian Guard, wakes one night from a dream of Liliths angelic punishers. Rebuked for her disobedience of Adam, Lilith has been separated from God, but now, her children plot revenge with members of a new Roman power, Domus Aurea. Rome is under siege, and it appears evil is winning. Those residing and visiting Rome are captives, unable to move about or escape without fear of death. However, a higher power is in their midst as angels keep watch, unbeknownst to the Vatican or Domus Aurea. Giuseppe is dragged into a tug-of-war between the people of Rome and the demons attempting to take over when two unassuming young men get involved. Daven and Adam have no great notions of fame or grandeur. Their only concern is for the safety of their loved ones, so they will fight the children of Lilith and anyone else who stands in their way. Rome is now a breeding ground of upheaval, but there is hope as humanity takes on the supernatural, saving the Vatican and possibly the world.

The Fellowship of the Beatific Vision

Chaucer on Overcoming Tyranny and Becoming Ourselves

Author: Norm Klassen

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 250

View: 833

In The Canterbury Tales, Geoffrey Chaucer asks a basic human question: How do we overcome tyranny? His answer goes to the heart of a revolutionary way of thinking about the very end of human existence and the nature of created being. His answer, declared performatively over the course of a symbolic pilgrimage, urges the view that humanity has an intrinsic need of grace in order to be itself. In portraying this outlook, Chaucer contributes to what has been called the "palaeo-Christian" understanding of creaturely freedom. Paradoxically, genuine freedom grows out of the dependency of all things upon God. In imaginatively inhabiting this view of reality, Chaucer aligns himself with that other great poet-theologian of the Middle Ages, Dante. Both are true Christian humanists. They recognize in art a fragile opportunity: not to reduce reality to a set of dogmatic propositions but to participate in an ever-deepening mystery. Chaucer effectively calls all would-be members of the pilgrim fellowship that is the church to behave as artists, interpretively responding to God in the finitude of their existence together.

The Beatific Vision

A Poem

Author: Samuel Codrington

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: English poetry

Page: 16

View: 578

The Beatific Vision Seeing GOD Face to Face

Author: Rasa Von Werder

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 122

View: 454

GOD SAID TO MOSES, YOU CANNOT SEE ME & LIVE- BUT GURU RASA VON WERDER SAW GOD & LIVED, AS GOD'S MEANING IS YOU CANNOT LIVE TO FLESH & SEE ME AS I AM, FACE TO FACE, YOU MUST GIVE UP ALL ATTACHMENT TO FLESH & THEN YOU CAN SEE ME- & SO RASA EXPLAINS IN DETAIL THE PROCESS OF PRAYER & EMPTINESS WHICH LEADS TO THIS REALIZATION -- THIS STATE IS THE MOST SUBLIME HUMAN CAN REACH AS NOT ONLY MUST ONE RISE ABOVE THE FLESH, BUT ALSO, MUST BE CLOTHED IN GLORY AS MARY OF AGREDA EXPLAINS IN THE MYSTICAL CITY OF GOD

The Beatific Vision

A Study of Dante

Author: Mrs. Ellen M. Mitchell

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 21

View: 966

Seeing God

The Beatific Vision in Christian Tradition

Author: Hans Boersma

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 488

View: 455

Christianity Today 2019 Book Award for Theology/Ethics To see God is our heart’s desire, our final purpose in life. But what does it mean to see God? And exactly how do we see God—with our physical eyes or with the mind’s eye? In this informed study of the beatific vision, Hans Boersma focuses on “vision” as a living metaphor and shows how the vision of God is not just a future but a present reality. Seeing God is both a historical theology and a dogmatic articulation of the beatific vision, of how the invisible God becomes visible to us. In examining what Christian thinkers throughout history have written about the beatific vision, Boersma explores how God trains us to see his character by transforming our eyes and minds, highlighting continuity from this world to the next. Christ-centered, sacramental, and ecumenical, Boersma’s work presents life as a never-ending journey toward seeing the face of God in Christ both here and in the world to come.

St. Albert the Great's Theory of the Beatific Vision

Author: Jeffrey P. Hergan

Publisher: Peter Lang Pub Incorporated

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 160

View: 953

St. Albert the Great began teaching at the University of Paris in 1243 - just two years after the Parisian Condemnation of 1241, which affirmed that created and finite intellects will see the divine essence directly in their beatific visions. This book translates and examines key texts in which St. Albert explains how it is possible for such intellects to know the infinite divine essence <I>in patria. With careful attention given to the philosophical and theological traditions that converged in thirteenth-century Paris<I>, St. Albert the Great's Theory of the Beatific Vision reveals the foundation of St. Albert's thought, demonstrating that beneath his Aristotelian terminology lies a Neo-Platonic epistemology and metaphysics wherein reality is identified with light. Providing detailed context for St. Albert's thought, this book also contrasts his views with those of his student, St. Thomas Aquinas, and their contemporary, St. Bonaventure. The result is a valuable resource for anyone exploring the unique commingling of philosophy and theology that reached its golden age in the scholastics of the thirteenth century.

Spiritual Traditions and the Virtues

Living Between Heaven and Earth

Author: Mark R. Wynn

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 320

View: 241

Spiritual Traditions and the Virtues develops a philosophical appreciation of the spiritual life. The book shows how a certain conception of spiritual good, one that is rooted in Thomas Aquinas's account of infused moral virtue, can generate a distinctive vision of human life and the possibilities for spiritual fulfilment. Wynn examines the character of the goods to which spiritual traditions are directed; the structure of such traditions, including the connection between their practical and creedal commitments; the relationship between the various vocabularies that are used to describe, from the insider's perspective, progress in the spiritual life; the significance of tradition as an epistemic category; and the question of what it takes for a spiritual tradition to be handed on from one person to another. In his account of the virtues, Aquinas shows how our relations to the everyday world can be folded into our relationship to the divine or sacred reality otherwise conceived. In this sense, he offers a vision of how it is possible to live between heaven and earth. Spiritual Traditions and the Virtues considers how that vision can be extended across the central domains of human thought and experience, and how it can deepen and diversify our understanding of what it is for a human life to be lived well.

The Trinitarian Christology of St Thomas Aquinas

Author: Dominic Legge

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 256

View: 184

The Trinitarian Christology of St Thomas Aquinas brings to light the Trinitarian riches in Thomas Aquinas's Christology. Dominic Legge, O.P, disproves Karl Rahner's assertion that Aquinas divorces the study of Christ from the Trinity, by offering a stimulating re-reading of Aquinas on his own terms, as a profound theologian of the Trinitarian mystery of God as manifested in and through Christ. Legge highlights that, for Aquinas, Christology is intrinsically Trinitarian, in its origin and its principles, its structure, and its role in the dispensation of salvation. He investigates the Trinitarian shape of the incarnation itself: the visible mission of the Son, sent by the Father, implicating the invisible mission of the Holy Spirit to his assumed human nature. For Aquinas, Christ's humanity, at its deepest foundations, incarnates the very personal being of the divine Son and Word of the Father, and hence every action of Christ reveals the Father, is from the Father, and leads back to the Father. This study also uncovers a remarkable Spirit Christology in Aquinas: Christ as man stands in need of the Spirit's anointing to carry out his saving work; his supernatural human knowledge is dependent on the Spirit's gift; and it is the Spirit who moves and guides him in every action, from Nazareth to Golgotha.

The Beatific Vision

Author: Thomas Conefry

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Beatific vision

Page: 140

View: 959

An Introduction to Natural Theology

Author: Maurice R. Holloway

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 520

View: 812

“What is the God of the philosopher? Can the philosopher, that is to say, can human reason, unenlightened by the revealed word, come to a true and secure understanding of ‘He-Who-Is’? Is it possible for mere man, without the impact of a personal experience, intimate and intuitive, to arrive by means of an objective demonstration at an absolute affirmation that the Being we call God exists, or that He is Pure Act, Existence Itself, because without him the world of our experience is unintelligible, a complete contradiction? “And even if we admit, as all Christian philosophers must, that unaided reason is able by its own power to reach an objectively true and secure assent that God exists, is there any evidence, in the recorded history of our world, that man, without the directive knowledge of revelation, ever did secure by a metaphysical effort this absolute truth that the Ipsum Esse exists? Whatever be the answer to this difficult problem—and we do not pretend to know it—it is obvious that Father Holloway, in composing his philosophical approach to God, allowed himself to be guided by the knowledge of faith. Indeed, he must have prayed often for the enlightenment which the supernatural motion of divine grace brings even to the limited and imperfect intellect of a philosopher.” —From the Foreword by Henri Renard, S.J.

Beat sound, Beat vision

The Beat spirit and popular song

Author: Laurence Coupe

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 232

View: 835

This book reveals the ideas behind the Beat vision which influenced the Beat sound of the songwriters who followed on from them. Having explored the thinking of Alan Watts, who coined the term ‘Beat Zen’, and who influenced the counterculture which emerged out of the Beat movement, it celebrates Jack Kerouac as a writer in pursuit of a ‘beatific’ vision. On this basis, the book goes on to explain the relevance of Kerouac and his friends Allen Ginsberg and Gary Snyder to songwriters who emerged in the 1960s. Not only are new, detailed readings of the lyrics of the Beatles and of Dylan given, but the range and depth of the Beat legacy within popular song is indicated by way of an overview of some important innovators: Jim Morrison, Joni Mitchell, Leonard Cohen, Donovan, the Incredible String Band, Van Morrison and Nick Drake.

Actualitas Omnium Actuum

Man's Beatific Vision of God as Apprehended by Thomas Aquinas

Author: William J. Hoye

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Beatific vision

Page: 363

View: 285

Encounter Between Eastern Orthodoxy and Radical Orthodoxy

Transfiguring the World Through the Word

Author: Dr Adrian Pabst

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 314

View: 780

This book presents the first debate between the contemporary movement Radical Orthodoxy and Eastern Orthodox theologians. Leading international scholars offer new insights and reflections on a wide range of contemporary issues from a specifically theological and philosophical perspective. The ancient notion of divine Wisdom (Sophia) serves as a common point of reference in this encounter. Both Radical and Eastern Orthodoxy agree that the transfiguration of the world through the Word is at the very centre of the Christian faith. The book explores how this process of transformation can be envisaged with regard to epistemological, ontological, aesthetical, ecclesiological and political questions. Contributors to this volume include Rowan Williams, John Milbank, Antoine Arjakovsky, Michael Northcott, Nicholas Loudovikos, Andrew Louth and Catherine Pickstock.

The Month

An Illustrated Magazine of Literature, Science and Art

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 968