Beach Huts and Bathing Machines

Author: Kathryn Ferry

Publisher: Shire Publications

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 64

View: 692

Behind the enduring popularity of beach huts lies a story of classic British eccentricity. Immensely photogenic and appealing, these colorful seaside buildings are direct successors of the Georgian bathing machine, which first appeared in the 1730s as a peculiar device to protect the modesty of rich and fashionable bathers. Kathryn Ferry paints a picture postcard view of the classic British seaside holiday through the history of beach huts and bathing machines, revealing how the changing fashions in society shaped their design and development. A fascinating celebration of the evolution of the beach hut from its unusual beginnings, to its status as a much-loved and sought-after structure by many a British holiday maker to this day.

Histories of Tourism

Representation, Identity and Conflict

Author: John K. Walton

Publisher: Channel View Publications

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 244

View: 416

This collection of essays presents develops the historical dimension to tourism studies through thematic case studies. The editor's introduction argues for the importance of a closer relationship between history and tourism studies, and an international team of contributors explores the relationships between tourism, representations, environments and identities in settings ranging from the global to the local, from the Roman Empire to the twentieth century, and from Frinton to the 'Far East'.

THE CLOCK CAFE STORY

Author: David Fowler

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 60

View: 876

Beach Huts

Author: Karen Averby

Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 64

View: 644

The beach hut is an integral part of the British seaside, and is no less popular now than it has ever been. This is the story of these quirky buildings.

SCARBOROUGH SNIPPETS

Author: David Fowler

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 200

View: 916

'Living in the past. It's always said pejoratively, as if the past is necessarily inferior to the future, or at any rate less important; nobody's ever condemned for looking forward, only back. But the truth is that we live in the past, whether we like it or not. That's where our life takes shape. Somewhere ahead, however near or far, is the end. But behind, shrouded in clouds of forgetting, lies the beginning'. This book about Scarborough IS unashamedly about looking back from the first mention of Scarborough in 8000 BC to the present day. It is not a formal history; rather a miscellany of interesting facts culled from many sources stretching back over the years.

The Horseman's Word

Author: Roger Garfitt

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 384

View: 193

In a memoir as vivid and unpredictable as any novel we follow Roger Garfitt on his journey from stable boy to jazz dancer, from Oxford dandy to Sixties drop-out. We see him on horseback with the Riding Master to the Kings of Portugal and in a beatnik pad with Redmond O'Hanlon. We watch as he is introduced to David Bowie and realises that the wrong one has come as the rock star. We follow him back to the Norfolk village where as a small child he had glimpsed the world through his grandfather's eyes and we are inside his head as he gradually cuts loose from the real world, eventually being committed to a locked ward in a mental hospital. Written with a poet's gift for language, The Horseman's Word is an account of what it is like to feel the world too acutely, to love too obsessively, to go right to the very edge and, miraculously, survive.

The Mysterious Beach Hut

Author: Jacky Atkins

Publisher: Strategic Book Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 180

View: 699

Holly, 12, and her sister, Beth, 9, are in their Brighton beach hut one day when there is a knock at the door. Marjorie, the little girl they meet, is somehow different, and very soon a friendship develops that mysteriously transports them to the summer of 1914 and the eve of the outbreak of war.

England's Seaside Resorts

Author: Allan Brodie

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 209

View: 360

For three centuries people have headed to the seaside. Although this was initially limited to a few wealthy people in search of cures for their ailments, during the 19th and 20th centuries a day at the seaside came within the reach of everyone. This change in the type and numbers of visitors has had a huge impact on coastal towns, transforming them from small working towns to the lively resorts we know, and love, today.Seaside resorts differ from inland towns in a number of important ways; there are types of buildings designed to entertain visitors and the character of all types of structures near the seafront have an exuberance rarely matched elsewhere.England’s Seaside Resorts, the culmination of four years of research, combines new information derived from the resorts themselves with a re-examination of many of the most significant, original documents. All stretches of the coastline, and all sizes of resorts, have been studied to explain what gives the seaside towns their special character. A large number of new photographs taken for this project, along with a selection of historic images from the National Monuments Record, provide a unique insight into England’s favourite holiday destinations.So pack up your buckets and spades and enjoy a trip to the seaside.

The English Seaside

Author: Peter Williams

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Photography

Page: 176

View: 844

There is a powerful sense of place at the seaside. You know what to expect. Fishing villages usually have a pier, boats, lobster pots, and masses of seagulls while resort towns have esplanades, piers, grand hotels and gardens. Certain seaside towns have just about everything: Weymouth, for example, has a grand parade of hotels, a wide esplanade and a small fishing village. Blackpool has more of everything - three piers, miles of hotels, the Tower, Winter Gardens, trams, illuminations - but no fishing and no castle! There is something about the seaside that brings out the beating heart of John Bull in the English: doggedly erecting our wind-breaks to capture every vestige of a watery sun; wrestling with deckchairs; wrapping up against the determined wind on the verandas of our beach huts; accepting that 'sand' in 'sandwich' means just that! But we still love it and nowhere else in the world can match its myriad charms and eccentricities. For too long the English seaside has suffered from bad press, accused of being tatty, cold grey and windswept. Peter Williams' evocative photographs in this fully revised edition of his acclaimed book will make you want to rediscover what a fantastic place the seaside is - full of character, charm and 'Englishness'.

Designing the Seaside

Architecture, Society and Nature

Author: Fred Gray

Publisher: Reaktion Books

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 336

View: 704

Presents a history of seaside architecture from the eighteenth century to the present day. This book covers the formal and informal design processes involved in major buildings as well as ephemeral structures from piers and pavilions to resort parks and open spaces to shops selling candy floss.