Baseball in Richmond

Author: Ron Pomfrey

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 649

From Daddy Boschen's first professional baseball "shoe shop team" to our current Richmond Braves, from the ballyards of the old fairgrounds of Monroe Park to the Diamond on the Boulevard, baseball in Richmond has flourished. Whether known as the Bluebirds, Bloody Shirts, Lawmakers, Crows, Johnnie Rebs, Colts, Vees, or Braves, each team brought fans through the turnstiles to cheer them to victory, and those fans always left the park with lasting baseball memories. Richmond's ball-gardens and cranks played host to the likes of Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb, Mickey Mantle, and Ted Williams, as well as homegrown stars, including Billy Nash, Ray Dandridge, Eddie Mooers, Tom West, and Granny Hamner.

Baseball and Richmond

A History of the Professional Game, 1884–2000

Author: W. Harrison Daniel

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 212

View: 789

Early baseball in Richmond, Virginia, was very much about business. The game was a means of promoting Richmond and its various industries and attractions, but it was plagued by instability. Competing interests fought for control of its fortunes in the city and changes in team ownership were frequent. The competitors vied to make a profit in any way they could on the game. As time passed, baseball became more established and eventually found its place in the city. Richmond’s affiliation with baseball, from the years 1884 to 2000, is a fascinating story. The book covers the players and owners, and also for nearly twelve decades the relationship shared by the team and the city. It highlights baseball’s early amateur beginnings in Richmond prior to 1884, the first year of professional baseball in the city in 1884, the revival of the Virginia State League from 1906 to 1914, the Virginia League from 1918 to 1928 and the Eastern League in 1931 and 1932, the Richmond Colts and the Piedmont League from 1933 to 1953, and Richmond’s association with the International League beginning in 1954.

Baseball Team Names

A Worldwide Dictionary, 1869–2011

Author: Richard Worth

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 416

View: 563

Professional baseball is full of arcane team names. The Los Angeles Dodgers, for instance, owe their nickname to the trolley tracks that honeycombed Brooklyn in the early 1880s. (Residents were “trolley dodgers.”) From the Negro Leagues, there were the Pittsburgh Crawfords (sponsored early by the Crawford Bath House and Recreation Center); from the minors, the Tucson Waddies (slang for cowboy) and, later, the Montgomery Biscuits (for the would-be concessions staple); from overseas, the Adelaide, Australia, Bite (a shark reference but also a pun for bight) and the Bussum, Netherlands, Mr. Cocker HCAW (the sponsoring restaurant chain, followed by the acronym for the official team name, Honkbalclub Allan Weerbaar). This comprehensive reference book explains the nicknames of thousands of major and minor league franchises, Negro League and early independent black clubs, and international teams—from 1869 through 2011.

Baseball State by State

Major and Negro League Players, Ballparks, Museums and Historical Sites

Author: Chris Jensen

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 384

View: 492

"From Alabama to Wyoming, this book provides information every fan should know about the fifty U.S. states. Each chapter covers the baseball history of of a state, its must-see sites (including museums and ballparks), career leaders in nine statistical categories, nicknames, and a roster of the all-time best native-born major and Negro League players"--Provided by publisher.

Children of the Streets of Richmond, 1865Ð1920

Author: Harry M. Ward

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 530

Richmond in the late 19th century was not the genteel peaceful community historians have made it. Virginia's capital was cosmopolitan, boisterous and crime-ridden. From 1905 to 1915 there was an official red light district. The police had their hands full with drunks and riffraff, and a variety of street urchins and waifs--most of whom were very poor--found themselves on the wrong side of the law. The juvenile delinquents of Richmond--some barely out of infancy--were held accountable in the Police Court. A juvenile court system was not established until 1916. Presiding over the Police Court for 32 years was Justice John Jeter Crutchfield who, though unlearned in the law, functioned like a biblical Solomon but with great showmanship. The Police Court attracted many tourists and some of Virginia's literary figures cut their teeth writing newspaper coverage of the proceedings, vying with each other for the most hilarious slant. What emerges from the public record is an amusing and touching picture of what life was really like in the post-Reconstruction urban South.

Baseball America 2007 Directory

Your Definitive Guide to the Game

Author: Baseball America (Firm)

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 392

View: 547

An annual reference for the forthcoming season provides a wealth of information for fans who are planning game-focused road trips and outings, in a guide that lists complete major-, minor-, and independent-league schedules; ballpark directions; and detailed contact information. Original.

The Richmond Virginias

The South's First Major League Baseball Team

Author: Robert Gudmestad

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Baseball

Page: 57

View: 821

Brown University Baseball

A Legacy of the Game

Author: Rick Harris

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 595

This book will chronicle the history of baseball at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island. Brown has earned the distinction of being the most influential institution regarding baseball in Rhode Island. Fields, players, coaches are also included. Perhaps the most interesting parts of the book are the stories revolving around students and baseball games. Racial Integration on the ball field at Brown University is also explored, as well as women who played baseball at Pembroke College (Brown's sister college prior to integration of female and male students).

Insiders' Guide® to Richmond, VA

Author: Maureen Egan

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Travel

Page: 328

View: 512

Insiders' Guide to Richmond is the essential source for in-depth travel and relocation information to Virginia's capital city. Written by a local (and true insider), this guide offers a personal and practical perspective of Richmond and its surrounding environs.

The Myth of the Amateur

A History of College Athletic Scholarships

Author: Ronald A. Smith

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 376

View: 431

In this in-depth look at the heated debates over paying college athletes, Ronald A. Smith starts at the beginning: the first intercollegiate athletics competition—a crew regatta between Harvard and Yale—in 1852, when both teams received an all-expenses-paid vacation from a railroad magnate. This striking opening sets Smith on the path of a story filled with paradoxes and hypocrisies that plays out on the field, in meeting rooms, and in courtrooms—and that ultimately reveals that any insistence on amateurism is invalid, because these athletes have always been paid, one way or another. From that first contest to athletes’ attempts to unionize and California’s 2019 Fair Pay to Play Act, Smith shows that, throughout the decades, undercover payments, hiring professional coaches, and breaking the NCAA’s rules on athletic scholarships have always been part of the game. He explores how the regulation of male and female student-athletes has shifted; how class, race, and gender played a role in these transitions; and how the case for amateurism evolved from a moral argument to one concerned with financially and legally protecting college sports and the NCAA. Timely and thought-provoking, The Myth of the Amateur is essential reading for college sports fans and scholars.

Blackball in the Hoosier Heartland: Unearthing the Negro Leagues Baseball History of Richmond, Indiana

Author: Alex Painter

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 274

View: 731

Though situated in what is traditionally considered the heart of Hoosier basketball country, perhaps no small city can claim Richmond, Indiana's history with baseball's vaunted Negro Leagues. For decades, hundreds of players, all barred from the major leagues on account of their skin color, graced the Richmond ball diamonds, and utterly dazzled the locals with their play. Many of the players would end up in the pantheon of baseball legends. Grab yourself some peanuts and Cracker Jack - and enjoy this untold history!

Baseball and the House of David

The Legendary Barnstorming Teams, 1915-1956

Author: P.J. Dragseth

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 230

View: 162

“The first thorough recounting, season-by-season and game-by-game, of the fascinating House of David baseball teams. Based primarily on meticulous research in contemporary press accounts, the book also includes player profiles and an appendix with House of David rosters. It is entertaining reading for baseball fans and a gold mine for future researchers.”—William A. Young, J.L. Wilkinson and the Kansas City Monarchs House of David barnstorming baseball (1915-1957) was played without pre-determined schedules, leagues, player statistics or standings. The Davids quickly gained popularity for their hirsute appearance and flashy, fast-paced style of play. During their 200 seasons, they travelled as many as 30,000 miles, criss-crossing the United States, Canada and Mexico. The Benton Harbor teams invented the pepper game and were winners year after year, becoming legends in barnstorming baseball. Initially a loose affiliation of players, the Davids expanded to three teams--Western, Central and Eastern--as their reputation grew, and hired outsiders to fill the rosters. Prominent among them were pitchers Grover Cleveland Alexander and Charlie "Chief" Bender, both player managers in the early 1930s. They resisted the color barrier, eagerly facing Negro League teams everywhere. In 1934, before their largest crowd to date, they defeated the first Negro team invited to the famed Denver Post Tournament, the great Kansas City Monarchs, for the championship.

Baseball Cyclopedia

Author: Ernest J. Lanigan

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 417

View: 719

Ernest J. Lanigan was the nephew of Sporting News founder Al Spink and one of three men in his immediate family to gain acclaim as a newspaperman. As sports editor for the New York Press and official scorer for a handful of World Series, he was the premier statistician of his day. Lanigan compiled the first baseball encyclopedia in 1922, and it is reprinted here with each of its twelve annual supplements. As the original publisher advertised on the book’s title page, it “[c]omprises a review of Professional Baseball, the history of all Major League Clubs, playing records and unique events, the batting, pitching and base running champions, World’s Series’ statistics and a carefully arranged alphabetical list of the records of more than 3500 Major League ball players, a feature never before attempted in print.”

Brotherhood and Baseball: A History Companion to "If Baseball Integrated Early"

Author: Doug Fowler

Publisher: Lulu Press, Inc

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 162

View: 646

Civil War ends early! Abraham Lincoln lives! Explore an eventful world with numerous twists and turns, as Lincoln's leniency leads to less Southern hostility toward the North. Can this and the integration of baseball from the start be enough to bring Civil Rights to America early in this alternate history? Can baseball really have the impact one man dreams? Enjoy as national leaders and ordinary people interact from the sudden Union win at Chancellorsville through the 1860s, then into the 1910s and '20s and beyond.

Baseball America's 1989 Almanac

Author: Baseball America

Publisher: Baseball America

ISBN:

Category: Baseball

Page: 287

View: 409

The baseball stat fan's dream--facts on not only the 1988 season in the American and National Leagues, but in the International League, the Pacific Coast League, the Eastern League, the Southern League, from the majors to the rookie leagues.

Official Baseball Annual

Rules, Teams, Photos

Author: National Baseball Congress of America

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Baseball

Page:

View: 494

Minor League Baseball

Community Building Through Hometown Sports

Author: Frank Hoffmann

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 220

View: 945

Examine the big-league benefits of minor league baseball! The Minor League Baseball: Community Building Through Hometown Sports examines the role played by minor league baseball in hundreds of cities and towns across the United States. Written from the unique perspective of a sociologist who also happens to be an avid baseball fan, the book looks at the contributions minor league teams make to the quality of life in their communities, creating focal points for spirit and cohesiveness while providing opportunities for interaction and entertainment. The book links theory and experience to present a “sociology of baseball” that explains the symbiotic relationship which brings people together for a common purpose—to root, root, root for the home team. From the author: Minor league baseball is played across the country in more than 100 very different communities. These communities seem to share a special bond with their teams. As with all sports teams, there is a symbiotic relationship between the team and the city or town that it represents. In the case of major league professional sports, the relationship is often fueled by economic outcomes. On the minor league level, the relationship appears to go beyond mere money and prestige. Minor league teams occupy a special place in our hearts. We are more forgiving when they lose, and extremely proud of them when they win. Minor League Baseball: Community Building Through Hometown Sports is a detailed look at the connection between town and team, including: economic benefits (development strategies, community growth) intangible benefits (ballpark camaraderie, hometown pride) fan attachment and attendance (demographic variables, stadium accessibility, “home court advantage”) case studies of two Maryland minor-league franchises--the Class AA Bowie Baysox and the Class A Hagerstown Suns Minor League Baseball: Community Building Through Hometown Sports also includes an introduction to the organizational structure of the minor leagues, a history of each current league, and charts and tables on attendance figures and franchise relocations. This book is essential reading for sociologists, sport sociologists/historians, academics and/or practitioners in the fields of community sociology and psychology, and of course, baseball fans.

Baseball in Portsmouth, Virginia

Author: Clay Shampoe

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 566

From 1895 until 1969, the city of Portsmouth, Virginia, fielded a professional minor league team. Fans flocked to see the Truckers, Cubs, Merrimacs, and Tides as they battled opponents on the dirt and grass of local diamonds. Many locals are surprised to discover that such renowned ballplayers as Pie Traynor, Hack Wilson, Eddie Stanky, and Harry "The Cat" Breechen got their start in Portsmouth. In 1933, Negro League legend Buck Leonard first played for the Portsmouth Revels and later returned to briefly star with the 1953 Merrimacs, his only opportunity to play integrated ball during his storied career. A number of former big-name players guided the team from the bench including Tony Lazzeri, Jimmie Foxx, and Pepper Martin to name a few. The images in this pictorial volume showcase only a fragment of the vast chronology of baseball as it was played in Portsmouth over the years. Yet their visual appeal and historical representation of the game allow the reader to experience and recall what it was once like to have the National Pastime as an integral part of the city.