Baroque Luxury Porcelain

The Manufactories of Du Paquier in Vienna and of Carlo Ginori in Florence

Author: Johann Kräftner

Publisher: Prestel Pub

ISBN:

Category: Antiques & Collectibles

Page: 510

View: 607

Shapely Bodies

The Image of Porcelain in Eighteenth-Century France

Author: Christine A. Jones

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 315

View: 923

Shapely Bodies: The Image of Porcelain in Eighteenth-Century France constructs the first cultural history of porcelain making in France. It takes its title from two types of “bodies” treated in this study: the craft of porcelain making shaped clods of earth into a clay body to produce high-end commodities and the French elite shaped human bodies into social subjects with the help of makeup, stylish patterns, and accessories. These practices crossed paths in the work of artisans, whose luxury objects reflected and also influenced the curves of fashion in the eighteenth century. French artisans began trials to reproduce fine Chinese porcelain in the 1660s. The challenge proved impossible until they found an essential ingredient, kaolin, in French soil in the 1760s. Shapely Bodies differs from other studies of French porcelain in that it does not begin in the 1760s at the Sèvres manufactory when it became technically possible to produce fine porcelain in France, but instead ends there. Without the secret of Chinese porcelain, artisans in France turned to radical forms of experimentation. Over the first half of the eighteenth century, they invented artificial alternatives to Chinese porcelain, decorated them with French style, and, with equal determination, shaped an identity for their new trade that distanced it from traditional guild-crafts and aligned it with scientific invention. The back story of porcelain making before kaolin provides a fascinating glimpse into the world of artisanal innovation and cultural mythmaking. To write artificial porcelain into a history of “real” porcelain dominated by China, Japan, and Meissen in Saxony, French porcelainiers learned to describe their new commodity in language that tapped into national pride and the mythic power of French savoir faire. Artificial porcelain cut such a fashionable image that by the mid-eighteenth century, Louis XV appropriated it for the glory of the crown. When the monarchy ended, revolutionaries reclaimed French porcelain, the fruit of a century of artisanal labor, for the Republic. Tracking how the porcelain arts were depicted in documents and visual arts during one hundred years of experimentation, Shapely Bodies reveals the politics behind the making of French porcelain’s image. Published by University of Delaware Press. Distributed worldwide by Rutgers University Press.

European Porcelain in The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Author: Jeffrey Munger

Publisher: Metropolitan Museum of Art

ISBN:

Category: Antiques & Collectibles

Page: 315

View: 362

Porcelain imported from China was the most highly coveted new medium in sixteenth- and early seventeenth-­century Europe. Its pure white color, translucency, and durability, as well as the delicacy of decoration, were impossible to achieve in European earthenware and stoneware. In response, European ceramic factories set out to discover the process of producing porcelain in the Chinese manner, with significant artistic, technical, and commercial ramifications for Britain and the Continent. Indeed, not only artisans, but kings, noble patrons, and entrepreneurs all joined in the quest, hoping to gain both prestige and profit from the enterprises they established. This beautifully illustrated volume showcases ninety works that span the late sixteenth to the mid-nineteenth century and reflect the major currents of European porcelain production. Each work is illustrated with glorious new photography, accompanied by analysis and interpretation by one of the leading experts in European decorative arts. Among the wide range of porcelains selected are rare blue-and-white wares and figures from Italy, superb examples from the Meissen factory in Germany and the Sèvres factory in France, and ceramics produced by leading British eighteenth-century artisans. Taken together, they reveal why the Metropolitan Museum’s holdings in this field are among the finest in the world. p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 14.0px Verdana}

Art, Mobility, and Exchange in Early Modern Tuscany and Eurasia

Author: Francesco Freddolini

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 222

View: 667

This book explores how the Medici Grand Dukes pursued ways to expand their political, commercial, and cultural networks beyond Europe, cultivating complex relations with the Ottoman Empire and other Islamicate regions, and looking further east to India, China, and Japan. The chapters in this volume discuss how casting a global, cross-cultural net was part and parcel of the Medicean political vision. Diplomatic gifts, items of commercial exchange, objects looted at war, maritime connections, and political plots were an inherent part of how the Medici projected their state on the global arena. The eleven chapters of this volume demonstrate that the mobility of objects, people, and knowledge that generated the global interactions analyzed here was not unidirectional—rather, it went both to and from Tuscany. In addition, by exploring evidence of objects produced in Tuscany for Asian markets,this book reveals hitherto neglected histories of how Western cultures projected themselves eastwards.

Investigation and Conservation of East Asian Cabinets in Imperial Residences (1700-1900)

Lacquerware & Porcelain. Conference 2013 Postprints

Author: Gabriela Krist

Publisher: Böhlau Verlag Wien

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 264

View: 479

The international workshop on conservation of East Asian cabinets in imperial residences (1700–1900) marked the starting point for the FWF-funded research project on the East Asian cabinets in Schönbrunn palace. The workshop facilitated the exchange of knowledge and experience between international conservators, art historians and related experts in the fields of Asian and European lacquerware and porcelain.

Interwoven Globe

The Worldwide Textile Trade, 1500-1800

Author: Amelia Peck

Publisher: Metropolitan Museum of Art

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 366

View: 455

Published in conjunction with an exhibition held at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Sept. 16, 2013-Jan. 5, 2014.

Beauty & Power

Renaissance and Baroque Bronzes from the Peter Marino Collection

Author: Jeremy Warren

Publisher: Paul Holberton Pub

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 287

View: 619

Bronze has long been used by sculptors to create complex and beautiful forms, three-dimensional realizations of the most vivid human emotions and experiences. The outstanding collection of European bronze sculptures formed by Peter Marino is built around an exploration of the human form, as depicted in this lustrous and sensuous material. With a special focus on French and Italian bronzes of the High Baroque, the collection includes masterpieces by some of the greatest sculptors of their age, among them Ferdinando Tacca, Giovanni Battista Foggini, Robert Le Lorrain, and Corneille van Cleve. The bronzes say much about the cultural preoccupations of their age, from the eternal fascination with the ancient world, to more modern concerns, such as contemporary theater and the legacy of great modern sculptors. Above all, the bronzes in the Marino collection are wonderful works of art, whose beauty and power speak across the centuries to today's audiences.

Porcelain

A History from the Heart of Europe

Author: Suzanne L. Marchand

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 544

View: 908

"This is the book on porcelain we have been waiting for. . . . A remarkable achievement."—Edmund de Waal, author of The Hare with Amber Eyes A sweeping cultural and economic history of porcelain, from the eighteenth century to the present Porcelain was invented in medieval China—but its secret recipe was first reproduced in Europe by an alchemist in the employ of the Saxon king Augustus the Strong. Saxony’s revered Meissen factory could not keep porcelain’s ingredients secret for long, however, and scores of Holy Roman princes quickly founded their own mercantile manufactories, soon to be rivaled by private entrepreneurs, eager to make not art but profits. As porcelain’s uses multiplied and its price plummeted, it lost much of its identity as aristocratic ornament, instead taking on a vast number of banal, yet even more culturally significant, roles. By the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, it became essential to bourgeois dining, and also acquired new functions in insulator tubes, shell casings, and teeth. Weaving together the experiences of entrepreneurs and artisans, state bureaucrats and female consumers, chemists and peddlers, Porcelain traces the remarkable story of “white gold” from its origins as a princely luxury item to its fate in Germany’s cataclysmic twentieth century. For three hundred years, porcelain firms have come and gone, but the industry itself, at least until very recently, has endured. After Augustus, porcelain became a quintessentially German commodity, integral to provincial pride, artisanal industrial production, and a familial sense of home. Telling the story of porcelain’s transformation from coveted luxury to household necessity and flea market staple, Porcelain offers a fascinating alternative history of art, business, taste, and consumption in Central Europe.

Chinoiserie

The Evolution of the Oriental Style in Italy from the 14th to the 19th Century

Author: Francesco Morena

Publisher: Centro Di Edizioni

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 326

View: 352

The first complete study of Chinoiserie in Italy.