Barlaam and Josaphat

A Christian Tale of the Buddha

Author: Gui de Cambrai

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 224

View: 477

A new translation of the most popular Christian tale of the Middle Ages, which springs from the story of the Buddha. When his astrologers foretell that his son Josaphat will convert to Christianity, the pagan King Avenir confines him to a palace, allowing him to know only the pleasures of the world, and to see no illness, death, or poverty. Despite the king's precautions, the hermit Barlaam comes to Josaphat and begins to teach the prince Christian beliefs through parables. Josaphat converts to Christianity, angering his father, who tries to win his son back to his religion before he, too, converts. After his father's death, Josaphat renounces the world and lives as a hermit in the wilderness with his teacher Barlaam. Long attributed to the eighth-century monk and scholar, St. John of Damascus, Barlaam and Josaphat was translated into numerous languages around the world. Philologists eventually traced the name Josaphat as a derivation from the Sanskrit bodhisattva, the Buddhist term for the future Buddha, highlighting this text as essential source reading for connections between several of the world’s most popular religions. The first version to appear in modern English, Peggy McCracken’s highly readable translation reintroduces a classic tale and makes it accessible once again. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

Barlaam and Ioasaph

Author: St. John Damascene

Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 476

View: 280

This inspirational book is about the life of Prince Iosaph who is brought up in the lap of luxury. He sees human sufferings for the first time when he meets a sick old beggar. This encounter leads Iosaph to search for his faith. His quest leads him to Barlaam, a monk, who introduces him to Christianity. Several powerful moments in the book keep the readers engrossed till the end. Enlightening!

Barlaam and Ioasaph

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Christian legends

Page: 640

View: 167

Barlaam and Ioasaph, a hagiographic novel in which an Indian prince becomes aware of the world's miseries and is converted to Christianity by a monk, is a Christianized version of the legend of the Buddha. Though often attributed to John Damascene (c. 676-749 CE), it was probably translated from Georgian into Greek in the eleventh century CE. One of the best known examples of the hagiographic novel, this is the tale of an Indian prince who becomes aware of the world's miseries and is converted to Christianity by the monk Barlaam. Barlaam and Josaphat (Ioasaph) were believed to have re-converted India after her lapse from conversion to Christianity, and they were numbered among the Christian saints. Centuries ago likenesses were noticed between the life of Josaphat and the life of the Buddha; the resemblances are in incidents, doctrine, and philosophy, and Barlaam's rules of abstinence resemble the Buddhist monk's. But not till the mid-nineteenth century was it recognised that, in Josaphat, the Buddha had been venerated as a Christian saint for about a thousand years. The origin of the story of Barlaam and Ioasaph--which in itself has little peculiar to Buddhism--appears to be a Manichaean tract produced in Central Asia. It was welcomed by the Arabs and by the Georgians. The Greek romance of Barlaam appears separately first in the 11th century. Most of the Greek manuscripts attribute the story to John the Monk, and it is only some later scribes who identify this John with John Damascene (ca. 676-749). There is strong evidence in Latin and Georgian as well as Greek that it was the Georgian Euthymius (who died in 1028) who caused the story to be translated from Georgian into Greek, the whole being reshaped and supplemented. The Greek romance soon spread throughout Christendom, and was translated into Latin, Old Slavonic, Armenian, and Arabic. An English version (from Latin) was used by Shakespeare in his caskets scene in The Merchant of Venice. David M. Lang's Introduction traces parallels between the Buddhist and Christian legends, discusses the importance of Arabic versions, and notes influences of the Manichaean creed.

Barlaam and Ioasaph

Author: Johannes (Damascenus)

Publisher: Loeb Classical Library

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 639

View: 514

The Greek version of the legend, from which European versions collectively descend, is attributed by some to Saint John of Damascus.

Barlaam and Ioasaph

Easyread Comfort Edition

Author: St. John Damascene

Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 340

View: 269

This inspirational book is about the life of Prince Iosaph who is brought up in the lap of luxury. He sees human sufferings for the first time when he meets a sick old beggar. This encounter leads Iosaph to search for his faith. His quest leads him to Barlaam, a monk, who introduces him to Christianity. Several powerful moments in the book keep the readers engrossed till the end. Enlightening!

The Precious Pearl

The Lives of Saints Barlaam and Ioasaph

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Christian saints

Page: 437

View: 709

Barlaam and Ioasaph

Author: Saint John of Damascus

Publisher: Aeterna Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 639

View: 576

There is no doubt that the author of Barlaam and Ioasaph himself regarded his story as a true narrative of the lives of real characters and that this view was universally held until quite recent times. The names of Saint Barlaam and Saint Ioasaph have figured in the Calendars both of the Roman and of the Greek Church and still retain their place in the latter. To-day, however, this view can be no longer held. A comparison of the story with the well-known legend of Buddha must convince every open-minded reader, that the outline of the plot is derived from the same Eastern source; in spite of all difference in detail, the general resemblance is quite undeniable. The writer himself tells us, that the story was brought to him from India, and it is highly probable, that what he heard was simply a version of the life of Buddha, adapted by Christians of the East to their own use. Aeterna Press

Barlaam and Ioasaph

Author: St John of Damascus

Publisher: Book Jungle

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 192

View: 414

John of Damascus was interested in law, theology, philosophy and music. He was the Chief Administrator to the Muslim caliph of Damascus, wrote works expounding the Christian faith, and composed hymns which are still in everyday use in Eastern Christian monasteries. The hagiographic novel Barlaam and Josaphat was traditionally attributed to John, but is in fact a work of written by the Georgian monk Euthymios in the 11th century. King Abenner or Avenier in India persecuted the Christian Church, founded by the Apostle Thomas. When astrologers predicted that his own son would some day become a Christian, Abenner had the young prince Josaphat isolated. Despite the imprisonment, Josaphat met the hermit Saint Barlaam and converted to Christianity. Josaphat kept his faith even in the face of his father's rage. Eventually, Abenner converted, gave his throne to Josaphat, and went into the desert to become a hermit.

Barlaam and Ioasaph

Author: St John of Damascus

Publisher: IndyPublish.com

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 196

View: 348

St. John Damascene: Barlaam and Ioasaph

Author: George Ratcliffe Woodward

Publisher: Wentworth Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 662

View: 717

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