Atelier Confectionery

Bonbons, Marshmallows, Toffees, Lollipops, Licorice...

Author: Yasmin Othman

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 252

View: 719

Atelier: Confectionary is the definitive guide to making caramels, chocolates and confectionery, and is the perfect manual for any home cook looking to start making delicious sweets for special occasions, parties and gifts - or to keep all to yourself. Mastering candies, toffees, caramels, fondants, liquorice, jellies, marshmallows, nougat, fudge, chocolate truffles, marzipan and macarons - not to mention home-made versions of your favourite chocolate bars - is a breeze with Atelier: Confectionary. Complete with simple, illustrated instructions on basic concepts and techniques like sugar temperature, pulling sugar, making a meringue and tempering chocolate, Atelier: Confectionarywill have readers churning out confectionery worthy of a Parisian confiseriein no time at all. With super simple, stylish graphics and attention to design- this is book is a real treat!

The Art of Confectionery

Author: American Antiquarian Cookbook Collection

Publisher: Andrews McMeel Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 350

View: 353

This encyclopedic collection contains forty-four chapters with hundreds of recipes, and it includes discussions of methodology and ingredients as well as detailed recipes for a stunning array of dishes. Included are recipes for preserving fruits and fruit juices, preparation of jams and jellies, fruit and other syrups, summer beverages, dessert cakes, ice cream, sherbet, candy, bon-bons, puddings, tinctures, oils, and colorants. Written by an anonymous author, the “receipts” are from the “best New York, Philadelphia, and Boston confectioners, and include a large number from the French and other nations.” “The confectioner’s art is an accomplishment which may be ranked among the most desirable and graceful of all that pertains to domestic economy . . . It is absolutely necessary to the economy of the household that this art should form a part of every lady’s education.”

Offshore Ferry Services of England and Scotland

A Useful Guide to the Shipping Lines and Routes

Author: Peter C. Smith

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 212

View: 659

The United Kingdom comprises thousands of islands and for many centuries transport between the main islands and the outlying communities has required reliable shipping routes, both long and short-haul, for commerce, trade and travel. Ferries have become an essential means of transport for many outlying populations and down the years routes have continually changed and been adapted to meet the requirements of the period. This remains so today, with established ferry routes in a constant state of flux, with the dire economic circumstances of the present imposing their own financial restraints upon routes and timetables. This volume presents a snapshot of the major Offshore Ferry routes as they currently stand, with details of the routes, the ships and the amenities; added to which are the outline histories of companies and links. This volume encapsulates all these strands and should prove a useful aide to all travellers.

Who Owns Whom

Continental Europe

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Corporations

Page:

View: 976

The Concepts of Criticism

Author: L. Aschenbrenner

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 551

View: 709

Tbis inquiry may be thought of as a sequel to The Concepts of Value and as an extension of the brief core-vocabulary of aesthetic concepts found in one of the appendices to it. In terms of sheer numbers, most of the value concepts of our language are to be found in the area of human relations and of the aesthetic. There are also other value vocabularies, shorter but equally important, for example, the cognitive and logical. These and other objects of pbilosopbical study (for example, the question of "other minds") deserve the kind of empirical survey that has been made of moral and aesthetic notions, if only to test a priori approaches to them. In the present studyan even more determined empirical approach than that adopted for the first has been found necessary. Once the moral or human value vocabulary has been identified, sentential contexts for the use of the terms readily come to mind. In a study of the language of criticism, however, the vocabulary has first to be sought in the utterances of critics themselves and quoted in sufficient context to make their critical intentions clear. The outcome is that the present study is of great length, about half of it being quotations from critics. The rule adopted for arriving at tbis length go on collecting quotations as long as new types of appraisal came was to to light.