Ask that Mountain

The Story of Parihaka

Author: Dick Scott

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Maori (New Zealand people)

Page: 216

View: 605

Parihaka has become a byword for Maori refusal to yield land, culture and dignity to New Zealand's colonial government. Well after the end of the New Zealand Wars, the people of this small settlement at the foot of Mt Taranaki held out against the encroachments of Pakeha settlers in a struggle that swapped the weapons of war for the weapons of peace. Taking as their symbol the white feather, the chiefs Te Whiti and Tohu led Parihaka in one of the world's first-recorded campaigns of passive resistance. Maori ploughmen wrote its message across the settlers' pastures, and Maori fencers underlined the point by throwing barriers across the queen's highways. Withstanding repeated military action, the spirit of resistance born at Parihaka kept alive the flame of that supposedly 'dying race', the Maori. Ask That Mountain draws on official papers, settler manuscripts and oral history to give the first complete account of what took place at Parihaka. Now in its ninth edition, this seminal work was in 1995 named by the Sunday Star-Times as one of the ten most important books published in New Zealand.

Parihaka

The Art of Passive Resistance

Author: Te Miringa Hohaia

Publisher: Victoria University Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 232

View: 703

"Drawing on previously unpublished manuscripts, many of the teachings and sayings of Te Whiti and Tohu - in Maori and English - are reproduced in full with extensive annotation by Te Miringa Hohaia. Parihaka: The Art of Passive Resistance reaches beyond the art and literary worlds to engage with cultural issues important to all citizens of Aotearoa New Zealand."--Jacket.

Historical Frictions

Maori Claims and Reinvented Histories

Author: Michael Belgrave

Publisher: Auckland University Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 300

View: 864

Historical Frictions explores the role of the courts and of various types of commissions in mediating and reinventing historical narratives of colonisation. Author Michael Belgrave shows how the courts became from 1840 places where different narratives of discovery and conquest, of loss and displacement and of claims to resources and mana were debated. These legal debates were not only between Maori and Pakeha; Maori also used the courts to maintain or reclaim traditional rights between Maori and Maori. From this perspective the Waitangi Tribunal is less radical than is often supposed and is seen to be carrying on a similar function to earlier tribunals and courts in the transformation of historical narratives. Historical Frictions covers a number of issues, all of which have been before the Waitangi Tribunal, including the Old Land Claims, the Kemp Purchase, confiscation, the Orakei Block, the Whanganui River, fisheries, the Chatham Islands and the Wellington Tenths claim.

Against the Draft

Essays on Conscientious Objection from the Radical Reformation to the Second World War

Author: Peter Brock

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 462

View: 407

Around the world and for hundreds of years, men and women have refused to be drafted into bearing arms for their nations' wars. These conscientious objectors to the draft are the subject of Peter Brock's latest collection, Against the Draft. Brock, the world's leading historian on pacifism, has assembled twenty-five of his essays on conscientious objection to the draft from the beginning of the Radical Reformation in 1525 to the end of the Second World War. Included in the collection are essays on little known facets of the anti-draft movement including the Anabaptist-Mennonite tradition of military exemption that started with the outset of the Radical Reformation in 1525 and has continued, with variations, until the present. Further articles deal with the Quakers in a number of countries, Civil-war America, Leo Tolstoy (who became a convinced pacifist in the later part of his life,) British conscientious objectors in the Non-Combatant Corps, the emergence of conscientious objection in Japan, and the fate of conscientious objectors in the psychiatric clinics of Germany and in interwar Poland. Essays on the Central European Nazerenes and on Jehovah's Witnesses in Nazi Germany highlight the exceptionally harsh treatment meted out to conscientious objectors belonging to these two sects, and their steadfast resistance to the state's demand to bear arms. Against the Draft makes an important contribution to the growing study of pacifism and conscientious objection, and represents a key work in the career of the field's foremost scholar.

Parihaka Invaded

Author: Dick Scott

Publisher: Bridget Williams Books

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 220

The non-violent defiance of Te Whiti-o-Rongomai, Tohu Kakahi and their followers at Parihaka is one of the great New Zealand narratives. This extract from the book by journalist Dick Scott that brought the story to the wider Pākehā world describes what happened when troops and settler volunteers invaded the village of Parihaka on 5 November 1881.

Beyond Betrayal

Author: Keith Newman

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 512

A companion piece to Keith Newman's Bible & Treaty (2010), Beyond Betrayal continues the gripping story of missionaries and Maori through until the mid-twentieth century, charting how each have ongoing influence on modern New Zealand.

The Parihaka Woman

Author: Witi Ihimaera

Publisher: Penguin Random House New Zealand Limited

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 318

View: 527

A wonderfully surprising, inventive and deeply moving riff on fact and fiction, history and imagination from one of New Zealand's finest and most memorable storytellers. There has never been a New Zealand novel quite like The Parihaka Woman. Richly imaginative and original, weaving together fact and fiction, it sets the remarkable story of Erenora against the historical background of the turbulent and compelling events that occurred in Parihaka during the 1870s and 1880s. Parihaka is the place Erenora calls home, a peaceful Taranaki settlement overcome by war and land confiscation. As her world is threatened, Erenora must find within herself the strength, courage and ingenuity to protect those whom she loves. And, like a Shakespearean heroine, she must change herself before she can take up her greatest challenge and save her exiled husband, Horitana.

Maori and the State

Crown–Maori Relations in New Zealand/Aotearoa, 1950–2000

Author: Richard Hill

Publisher: Victoria University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 350

View: 857

Presenting the most recent research and written by an expert in the field, this examination explores the principal interrelationships between the British Crown and the Maori people in the 1950s and 1960s when Crown assimilation policies intensified—and during the 1970s—when the pressure of the Maori renaissance encouraged policies and goals based on biculturalism. A subject central to New Zealand’s culture, this is an important and historical analysis of the country and the wider issue of indigenous peoples’ rights.

BWB Texts: Turning Points

Author: Geoff Chapple

Publisher: Bridget Williams Books

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page:

View: 551

Award-winning writers Geoff Chapple, Claudia Orange, Anne Salmond and Dick Scott explore pivotal moments in New Zealand’s history in this bundle of BWB Texts. These four works are combined into one easy-to-read e-book, available direct and DRM-free from our website or from international e-book retailers. In When the Tour Came to Auckland Geoff Chapple describes the startling scenes as the Springbok rugby tour of New Zealand in 1981 comes to a violent conclusion. In What Happened at Waitangi? Claudia Orange explains the events on the ground that led to the signing of the Treaty on 6 February 1840. Anne Salmond’s First Contact details the dramatic visit of Dutch ships led by Abel Tasman to Golden Bay at the top of the South Island in 1642, and the meeting of Māori and European worlds. Dick Scott’s Parihaka Invaded describes the non-violent defiance of Te Whiti-o-Rongomai, Tohu Kakahi and their followers at Parihaka and is one of the great New Zealand narratives. BWB Texts are short books on big subjects by great New Zealand writers. Commissioned as short digital-first works, BWB Texts unlock diverse stories, insights and analysis from the best of our past, present and future New Zealand writing.