Architecture Is Fun

Author: Sharon Exley

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 192

View: 758

* Grouped into finished works by typology and thematic idea, this monograph is packed with rich illustrations, plans, full-color, photography, and incisive commentary on storytelling through design, toolkits for wayfinding, embedding research for better experience outcomes, with strategies and tactics behind each project's development to help attract and engage people to play, learn, explore, and experience these places* Projects featured include the Mid-Michigan Children's Museum, Young at Art Museum, Lincoln Park Zoo: Pritzker Family Zoo, The Latin School of Chicago Interactive Science Forum, and the DuPage Children's Museum, among many othersIn a follow-up to the very successful monograph Design for Kids (Images Publishing, 2007), here Sharon Exley and Peter Exley go about expanding on the key philosophies behind their unique practice. Namely, that play is an invitation to Architecture Is Fun. Through architecture, play can be manifest, challenged, and celebrated. Finding out who will play (and live, work, and learn) in our buildings is an intriguing challenge. The firm likes to discover the architectural catalysts that will give character to a building. Often this involves the universal language of Play. Play fits all bodies. Play is accessible. Play inspires innovation. Play puts us in the present. Play engages us. Play is memorable. Play connects us to others and to the world. This beautifully illustrated book offers a glimpse into the firm's interdisciplinary and participatory processes and how it believes that architecture and play are transformative.

Architecture Thinking across Boundaries

Knowledge transfers since the 1960s

Author: Rajesh Heynickx

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 216

View: 254

While most studies on the history of architectural theory have been concerned with what has been said and written, this book is concerned with how architecture theory has been created and transmitted. Architecture Thinking across Boundaries looks at architectural theory through the lens of intellectual history. Eleven original essays explore a variety of themes and contexts, each examining how architectural knowledge has been transferred across social, spatial and disciplinary boundaries - whether through the international circulation of ideas, transdisciplinary exchanges, or transfers from design practice to theory and back again. Dissecting the frictions, transformations and resistances that mark these journeys, the essays in this book reflect upon the myriad routes that architectural knowledge has taken while developing into architectural theory. They critically enquire the interstices – geographical, temporal and epistemological – that lie beyond fixed narratives. They show how unstable, vital and eminently mobile the processes of thinking about architecture have been.

Festival Architecture

Author: Sarah Bonnemaison

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 332

View: 584

With contributions from provocative art and architectural historians, this book is a unique exposition of the temporary architecture erected for festivals and the role it has played in developing Western architectural and urban theory. Festival Architecture is arranged in historical periods – from Antiquity to the modern era – and divided between analyses of specific festivals, set in relation to contemporary architecture and urban design ideas and theories. Illustrated with a wealth of unusual and rarely-seen images from the European festival tradition, this is a fascinating outline of the history of festival architecture ideal for postgraduate architecture and urban design students.

Architecture of the Cape Cod Summer

The Work of Polhemus Savery DaSilva

Author: Michael J. Crosbie

Publisher: Images Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 276

View: 600

The work of Polhemus Savery DaSilva Architects Builders reflects the special qualities of Cape Cod, Martha's Vineyard, and Nantucket. Architecture of the Cape God Summer presents more than ten years of evocative design and well-crafted construction that is rooted in this tabled place. In an architectural world increasingly polarized between strict revivalist classicism and "avant-grade" abstraction, the work of Polhemus Savery DaSilva displays a compelling third way. The book features twenty-five projects that range from modest to elaborate. Each is an individual creation tailored to its specific location and client. Several additional projects are depicted in a chronology of the firm's major work. Drawings by the firm and more that four hundred color photography by leading architectural photographers illustrate this sixth volume of the New Classicists series.

Architectural History Retold

Author: Paul Davies

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 204

View: 395

How much do you know about Greek architecture? Roman? Gothic? The Renaissance? Modernism? Perhaps more importantly, do you know how these are connected or how one style evolved to become another? Or what happened historically during each of these periods? Architectural History Retold is your roadmap for your journey through architectural history. Offering a fresh take on what the author calls the ‘Great Enlightenment project’, it traces the grand narrative of western architecture in one concise, accessible volume. Starting in Ancient Greece and leading up to the present day, Paul Davies' unconventional, engaging style brings the past back to life, helping you to think beyond separate components and styles to recognise ‘the bigger picture’. The author is an academic and journalist with three decades of experience in introducing students to architectural history. The book is based on his successful entry-level course which has used the same unstuffy approach to break down barriers to understanding and engagement and inspire generations of students.

Architecture In Use

Author: DJM van der Voordt

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 326

View: 682

This unique book discusses programming, design and building evaluation providing a ‘joined up’ approach to building design. By linking the functional and architectonic qualities of a building, the authors show the practical implications of the utility value of buildings. Starting by looking at how the relationship between form and function has been dealt with by different approaches to architecture from a historical perspective, it goes on to discuss how the desired functional quality and utility value of a building can be expressed in a brief and given a physical form by the architect. Finally, it advises on how to carry out post-occupancy evaluation and provides the architect with methods and techniques for testing whether the intended utility value of a building has been achieved.

Form Follows Fun

Modernism and Modernity in British Pleasure Architecture 1925–1940

Author: Bruce Peter

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 224

View: 707

Authoritative and readable, this excellent text, illustrated by a unique pictorial record of period architecture, surveys and examines how and why the architecture of pleasure related to the stylistic and ideological concerns of modernism in 1930s Britain. Responding to the current interest in modernism and packed with a substantial archive of high quality photographs and other documentation, it relates the professional, entrepreneurial and institutional infrastructures affecting the pleasure industry’s architectural development and appearance in 1930s. A broad range of building through which the general public first experienced Modernism are covered, including: commercial – holiday camps, cinemas and greyhound racing stadia municipal and governmental projects – zoos, seaside pavilions, concert halls, and imperial and international exhibitions. Arguing that the responses to modernism through the architecture of pleasure were conditioned by wider debates about the role of design in relation to high and mass culture, this book is an ideal resource for all those interested in architectural history and design in Britain between the wars.

Architecture Post Mortem

The Diastolic Architecture of Decline, Dystopia, and Death

Author: Dr David Bertolini

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 266

View: 725

Architecture Post Mortem surveys architecture’s encounter with death, decline, and ruination following late capitalism. As the world moves closer to an economic abyss that many perceive to be the death of capital, contraction and crisis are no longer mere phases of normal market fluctuations, but rather the irruption of the unconscious of ideology itself. Post mortem is that historical moment wherein architecture’s symbolic contract with capital is put on stage, naked to all. Architecture is not irrelevant to fiscal and political contagion as is commonly believed; it is the victim and penetrating analytical agent of the current crisis. As the very apparatus for modernity’s guilt and unfulfilled drives-modernity’s debt-architecture is that ideological element that functions as a master signifier of its own destruction, ordering all other signifiers and modes of signification beneath it. It is under these conditions that architecture theory has retreated to an 'Alamo' of history, a final desert outpost where history has been asked to transcend itself. For architecture’s hoped-for utopia always involves an apocalypse. This timely collection of essays reformulates architecture’s relation to modernity via the operational death-drive: architecture is but a passage between life and death. This collection includes essays by Kazi K. Ashraf, David Bertolini, Simone Brott, Peggy Deamer, Didem Ekici, Paul Emmons, Donald Kunze, Todd McGowan, Gevork Hartoonian, Nadir Lahiji, Erika Naginski, and Dennis Maher.

Innovations in Hospital Architecture

Author: Stephen Verderber

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 392

View: 988

Captures key recent developments in the rapidly evolving field of sustainable hospital architecture.

How Architecture Works

A Humanist's Toolkit

Author: Witold Rybczynski

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 368

View: 555

An essential toolkit for understanding architecture as both art form and the setting for our everyday lives We spend most of our days and nights in buildings, living and working and sometimes playing. Buildings often overawe us with their beauty. Architecture is both setting for our everyday lives and public art form—but it remains mysterious to most of us. In How Architecture Works, Witold Rybczynski, one of our best, most stylish critics and winner of the Vincent Scully Prize for his architectural writing, answers our most fundamental questions about how good—and not-so-good—buildings are designed and constructed. Introducing the reader to the rich and varied world of modern architecture, he takes us behind the scenes, revealing how architects as different as Frank Gehry, Renzo Piano, and Robert A. M. Stern envision and create their designs. He teaches us how to "read" plans, how buildings respond to their settings, and how the smallest detail—of a stair balustrade, for instance—can convey an architect's vision. Ranging widely from a war memorial in London to an opera house in St. Petersburg, from the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C., to a famous architect's private retreat in downtown Princeton, How Architecture Works, explains the central elements that make up good building design. It is an enlightening humanist's toolkit for thinking about the built environment and seeing it afresh. "Architecture, if it is any good, speaks to all of us," Rybczynski writes. This revelatory book is his grand tour of architecture today.