Anthropology of the Brain

Consciousness, Culture, and Free Will

Author: Roger Bartra

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page:

View: 628

In this unique exploration of the mysteries of the human brain, Roger Bartra shows that consciousness is a phenomenon that occurs not only in the mind but also in an external network, a symbolic system. He argues that the symbolic systems created by humans in art, language, in cooking or in dress, are the key to understanding human consciousness. Placing culture at the centre of his analysis, Bartra brings together findings from anthropology and cognitive science and offers an original vision of the continuity between the brain and its symbolic environment. The book is essential reading for neurologists, cognitive scientists and anthropologists alike.

Social and Cultural Anthropology: The Key Concepts

Author: Nigel Rapport

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 548

View: 570

Social and Cultural Anthropology: the Key Concepts is an easy to use A-Z guide to the central concepts that students are likely to encounter in this field. Now fully updated, this third edition includes entries on: Material Culture Environment Human Rights Hybridity Alterity Cosmopolitanism Ethnography Applied Anthropology Gender Cybernetics With full cross-referencing and revised further reading to point students towards the latest writings in Social and Cultural Anthropology, this is a superb reference resource for anyone studying or teaching in this area.

Bridges to Consciousness

Complexes and complexity

Author: Nancy M. Krieger

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 202

View: 725

This book investigates consciousness as an emergent state arising from the global functioning of the brain and the body. In this research Krieger applies these concepts to analytical psychology, particularly to the constellation of the complex and of the archetype. Global brain functioning is considered as a complex system whose macroscopic, emergent patterns such as thoughts and behaviours are determined by physical parameters including emotion, memory, and perception. The concept of the feeling-toned complex was among the first of the theories to be developed by Jung, and the theories of complexity and dynamical systems which subsequently developed in the physical sciences did not exist at the time. This book takes a new look at the feeling-toned complex as a basin of attraction which competes for consciousness against other complexes to determine behaviour. By drawing parallels between current ideas in neuroscience and Jung’s more traditional theories, Krieger discusses the relevance for both psychotherapy and everyday life. Bridges to Consciousness considers the importance of the link between emotion and the complex in both the establishment of consciousness and the determination of self-esteem, making the work relevant to therapists and analysts. This book will also awaken interest in complexes in both the Jungian and wider neuroscientific research communities and will therefore interest researchers and academics in the field of psychology who want an insight into how the ideas of Jung can be applied beyond the traditional analytic field.

Reclaiming Virtue

How we can develop the moral intelligence to do the right thing at the right time for the right reason

Author: John Bradshaw

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 528

View: 731

John Bradshaw is one of the bestselling self-help authors of our generation and a dominant figure in the fields of addiction/recovery and family systems. In RECLAIMING VIRTUE, his first new book in more than ten years, Bradshaw takes on a new challenge. He has written a landmark exploration of the life of virtue, how we can develop it in ourselves, and how we can teach it to our children. RECLAIMING VIRTUE redefines what it means to live a moral life in today's world. Coming at a time of heightened debate about public and private morality, a time of greed and lack of caring, he says that the answer is not simply to return to traditional rules-based morality and an idealised past. Instead, he shows that each of us has what he calls an inborn moral intelligence, an inner guidance system, that can lead us - if we know how to cultivate it in ourselves and others. Step by step, Bradshaw shows us how our deepest instincts for goodness can be developed in childhood and nurtured throughout adult life. The result is a compelling vision of good character and moral responsibility for the modern world. Whether the topic is sex, discipline, marriage, the development of conscience or the true aims of education, Bradshaw once again provokes, enlightens and inspires readers everywhere.

The Conscious Mind

Author: Zoltan Torey

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 208

View: 470

How did the human mind emerge from the collection of neurons that makes up the brain? How did the brain acquire self-awareness, functional autonomy, language, and the ability to think, to understand itself and the world? In this volume in the Essential Knowledge series, Zoltan Torey offers an accessible and concise description of the evolutionary breakthrough that created the human mind. Drawing on insights from evolutionary biology, neuroscience, and linguistics, Torey reconstructs the sequence of events by which Homo erectus became Homo sapiens. He describes the augmented functioning that underpins the emergent mind -- a new ("off-line") internal response system with which the brain accesses itself and then forms a selection mechanism for mentally generated behavior options. This functional breakthrough, Torey argues, explains how the animal brain's "awareness" became self-accessible and reflective -- that is, how the human brain acquired a conscious mind. Consciousness, unlike animal awareness, is not a unitary phenomenon but a composite process. Torey's account shows how protolanguage evolved into language, how a brain subsystem for the emergent mind was built, and why these developments are opaque to introspection. We experience the brain's functional autonomy, he argues, as free will. Torey proposes that once life began, consciousness had to emerge -- because consciousness is the informational source of the brain's behavioral response. Consciousness, he argues, is not a newly acquired "quality," "cosmic principle," "circuitry arrangement," or "epiphenomenon," as others have argued, but an indispensable working component of the living system's manner of functioning.

Worldviews, Science and Us

Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Worlds, Cultures and Society: Leo Apostel Center, Brussels Free University, August 2009; July 2007, September 2010

Author: Diederik Aerts

Publisher: World Scientific

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 220

View: 366

This volume is part of the ?Worldviews, Science and Us? series of proceedings and contains several contributions on the subject of worlds, cultures and society. It represents the proceedings of several workshops and discussion panels organized by the Leo Apostel Center for Interdisciplinary studies within the framework of the ?Research on the Construction of Integrating Worldviews? research community set up by the Flanders Fund for Scientific Research, over the period of time between 2005 to 2010. Further information about this research community and a full list of the associated international research centers can be found at http: //www.vub.ac.be/CLEA/res/worldviews/

Consumer Behaviour

Perspectives, Findings and Explanations

Author: John O'Shaughnessy

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 536

View: 550

Drawing on the unique academic and professional experience of its author, Consumer Behavior explores the contribution that each of the major social science disciplines has made to the study of the field. The book considers the perspective of each of these disciplines in turn, enabling students to critically evaluate their individual strengths, weaknesses, biases and limitations. International case studies and discussion questions are included throughout the text to demonstrate applied theories and provoke critical analysis. Consumer Behavior is ideal for advanced undergraduate and postgraduate students of consumer behavior and consumer psychology.

New Horizons in Theology

The Annual Publication of the College Theology Society, 2004

Author: Terrence W. Tilley

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 288

View: 886

To celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the College Theology Society, these original essays explore how theology has changed over the previous fifty years, theological concerns on the horizon today, and approaches to teaching theology appropriate for the twenty-first century. Contributors include: Elizabeth A. Johnson Joseph A. Komonchak Norbert Rigali J. Matthew Ashley Elizabeth T. Groppe Michael Horace Barnes Steven R. Harmon Colleen M. Mallon Anne M. Clifford Sally Kenel Randall Jay Woodard Sandra Yocum Mize Mary Ann Hinsdale Miguel H. Diaz James A. Donahue Suzanne C. Toton Ismael Muvingi

Emotions as Bio-cultural Processes

Author: Birgitt Röttger-Rössler

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 418

View: 925

Emotions have emerged as a topic of interest across the disciplines, yet studies and findings on emotions tend to fall into two camps: body versus brain, nature versus nurture. Emotions as Bio-cultural Processes offers a unique collaboration across the biological/social divide—from psychology and neuroscience to cultural anthropology and sociology—as 15 noted researchers develop a common language, theoretical basis, and methodology for examining this most sociocognitive aspect of our lives. Starting with our evolutionary past and continuing into our modern world of social classes and norms, these multidisciplinary perspectives reveal the complex interplay of biological, social, cultural, and personal factors at work in emotions, with particular emphasis on the nuances involved in pride and shame. A sampling of the topics: (1) The roles of the brain in emotional processing. (2) Emotional development milestones in childhood. (3) Social feeling rules and the experience of loss. (4) Emotions as commodities? The management of feelings and the self-help industry. (5) Honor and dishonor: societal and gender manifestations of pride and shame. (6) Emotion regulation and youth culture. (7) Pride and shame in the classroom. A volume of such wide and integrative scope as Emotions as Bio-cultural Processes should attract a large cohort of readers on both sides of the debate, among them emotion researchers, social and developmental psychologists, sociologists, social anthropologists, and others who analyze the links between humans that on the one hand differentiate us as individuals but on the other hand tie us to our socio-cultural worlds.