500 Manga Heroes & Villains

Author: Helen McCarthy

Publisher: Barrons Educational Series Incorporated

ISBN:

Category: Comics & Graphic Novels

Page: 352

View: 945

A guide to the Japanese comic book describes the genre's characters from Astro Boy to Yu-Gi-Oh.

Naughty Girls and Gay Male Romance/Porn: Slash Fiction, Boys’ Love Manga, and Other Works by Female “Cross-Voyeurs” in the U.S. Academic Discourses

Author: Carola Katharina Bauer

Publisher: Anchor Academic Publishing (aap_verlag)

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 131

View: 178

Despite the fact that there actually exists a large number of pornographic and romantic texts about male homosexuality consumed and produced by American women since the 1970s, the "abnormality" of those female cross-voyeurs is constantly underlined in U.S. popular and academic culture. As the astonished, public reactions in the face of a largely female (heterosexual) audience of “Brokeback Mountain” (2005) and “Queer as Folk” (2000-2005) have shown, a woman's erotic/romantic interest in male homosexuality is definitely not as accepted as its male counterpart (men consuming lesbian porn). In the academic publications on female cross-voyeurs, the application of double standards with regard to male/female cross-voyeurism is even more obvious. As Karen Hellekson and Kristina Busse note in their "Introduction" to “Fan Fiction and Fan Communities in the Internet” (2006), slash fiction – fan fiction about male homosexual relationships mainly produced and consumed by women – has stood in the center of fan fiction studies so far, despite being merely a subgenre of it. The reason for this seems to be an urge to explain the underlying motivations for the fascination of women with m/m romance or pornography within the academic discourse – a trend which differs completely from the extremely under-theorized complex of men interested in "lesbians." It is this obvious influence of conventional gender stereotypes on the perception of these phenomena that provokes me to examine the way in which the works of female cross-voyeurism and their consumers/producers are conceptualized in the U.S. scholarly accounts. In many ways, this thesis explores unknown territories and respectively tries to take a closer look at academic problems that have not been adequately addressed yet.

Watching Anime, Reading Manga

25 Years of Essays and Reviews

Author: Fred Patten

Publisher: Stone Bridge Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 360

View: 417

The first book-length collection by the most respected writer on anime and manga today

Contents Tourism and Pop Culture Fandom

Transnational Tourist Experiences

Author: Takayoshi Yamamura

Publisher: Channel View Publications

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page:

View: 323

This is the first book to apply the concept of ‘contents tourism’ in a global context and to establish an international and interdisciplinary framework for contents tourism research. The term ‘contents tourism’ gained official recognition in Japan when it was defined by the Japanese government in 2005, and it has been characterised as ‘travel behaviour motivated fully or partially by narratives, characters, locations, and other creative elements of popular culture forms including film, television dramas, manga, anime, novels and computer games’. The book builds on previous research from Japan and explores three main themes of contents tourism: ‘the Contentsization of Literary Worlds’, ‘Tourist Behaviours at “Sacred Sites” of Contents Tourism’ and ‘Contents Tourism as Pilgrimage’ and draws together these key themes to propose a set of policy implications for achieving successful and sustainable contents tourism in the 21st century.

Japanese Popular Culture and Contents Tourism

Author: Philip A. Seaton

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 110

View: 864

Contents tourism is tourism induced by the contents (narratives, characters, locations and other creative elements) of films, novels, games, manga, anime, television dramas and other forms of popular culture. Amidst the boom in global interest in Japanese popular culture, the utilization of popular culture to induce tourism domestically and internationally has been central to the "Cool Japan" strategy and, since 2005, government policy for local community revitalization. This book presents four main case studies of contents tourism: the phenomenon of "anime pilgrimage" to sites appearing in animated film; the travel behaviours and "pop-spiritualism" of female history fans to heritage sites; the collaboration between local community, fans and copyright holders that underpinned an anime-induced tourism boom in a small town north of Tokyo; and the large-scale economic impacts of tourism induced by NHK’s annual samurai period drama (Taiga Drama). It is the first major collection of articles published in English about media-induced tourism in Japan using the "contents tourism" approach. This book will be of particular interest to students and researchers of media and tourism studies in Asia. This book was previously published as a special issue of Japan Forum.

Manga Discourse in Japan Theatre

Author: Fukushima

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 714

During the Japanese 'bubble' economy of the 1980's, the youth of Japan began to exert unprecedented influence on Japanese culture through their spirited patronage of certain art forms previously deemed subcultural or avant-garde. Among these were manga (Japanese comics or animation) and shogekijo (Japanese little theater). These art forms, while ve

Manga and Anime Go to Hollywood

Author: Northrop Davis

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 440

View: 435

The media industries in the United States and Japan are similar in much the same way different animal species are: while a horse and a kangaroo share maybe 95% of their DNA, they're nonetheless very different animals-and so it is with manga and anime in Japanese and Hollywood animation, movies, and television. Though they share some key common elements, they developed mostly separately while still influencing each other significantly along the way. That confluence is now accelerating into new forms of hybridization that will drive much of future storytelling entertainment. Packed with original interviews with top creators in these fields and illuminating case studies, Manga and Anime Go to Hollywood helps to parse out these these shared and diverging genetic codes, revealing the cross-influences and independent traits of Japanese and American animation. In addition, Manga and Anime Go to Hollywood shows how to use this knowledge creatively to shape the future of global narrative storytelling, including through the educational system. Northrop Davis paints a fascinating picture of the interrelated history of Japanese manga/anime and Hollywood since the Meiji period through to World War II and up to the present day - and even to into the future.

Dragon Soul

30 Years of Dragon Ball Fandom

Author: Derek Padula

Publisher: Derek Padula

ISBN:

Category: Comics & Graphic Novels

Page: 365

View: 393

With a foreword from Christopher Sabat and Sean Schemmel, Dragon Soul: 30 Years of Dragon Ball Fandom is a grand celebration of the world's greatest anime and manga and it's momentous 30th Anniversary. Join me on a global adventure in search of the 7 dragon balls, as we head west toward Japan, the birthplace of Dragon Ball. Along the way we'll meet 81 fans from 25 countries who will share their Dragon Ball story. From artists to authors, collectors to philosophers, we'll hear their Dragon Soul and discover how Dragon Ball changed their lives. Includes over 100 images. We'll meet such famous fans as Lawrence Simpson (MasakoX) from Team Four Star, Malik from Dragon Ball New Age, Salagir from Dragon Ball Multiverse, MMA fighter Marcus Brimage, YouTube celebrities SSJGoshin4, Nelson Junior (Casa do Kame), and film critic Chris Stuckmann, famous cosplayers "Living Ichigo," Atara Collis, and Jah'lon Escudero, the creators of Dragon Ball Z: Light of Hope, Twitter star @Goku, authors Patrick Galbraith, Nestor Rubio, and Vicente Ramirez, and dozens more. Joining us will be 27 professionals from 7 countries, including American voice actors Chris Sabat (Vegeta), Sean Schemmel (Goku), Chris Ayres (Freeza), Chris Rager (Mister Satan), Mike McFarland (Master Roshi), Chuck Huber (Android 17), Kyle Hebert (Son Gohan), Jason Douglas (Beerus), Chris Cason (Tenshinhan), FUNimation employees Justin Rojas, Adam Sheehan, and Rick Villa, Dragon Ball Z composer Bruce Faulconer, Dragon Ball manga editor Jason Thompson, Canadian voice actors Peter Kelamis (Goku) and Brian Drummond (Vegeta), Latin American voice actors Mario Castaneda (Goku), Rene Garcia (Vegeta), Eduardo Garza (Krillin), French voice actor Eric Legrand (Vegeta), French journalist Olivier Richard, Spanish voice actors Jose Antonio Gavira (Goku), Julia Oliva (Chichi), and manga editor David Hernando, Danish voice actors Caspar Philllipson (Goku) and Peter Secher Schmidt (Freeza), and Brazilian voice actor Wendel Bezerra (Goku). Gather your belongings, jump on your magic cloud, and embark on a grand adventure, in Dragon Soul: 30 Years of Dragon Ball Fandom!

Leiji Matsumoto

Essays on the Manga and Anime Legend

Author: Helen McCarthy

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Comics & Graphic Novels

Page: 246

View: 384

Leiji Matsumoto is one of Japan's most influential myth creators. Yet the huge scope of his work, spanning past, present and future in a constantly connecting multiverse, is largely unknown outside Japan. Matsumoto was the major creative force on Star Blazers, America's gateway drug for TV anime, and created Captain Harlock, a TV phenomenon in Europe. As well as space operas, he made manga on musicians from Bowie to Tchaikovsky, wrote the manga version of American cowboy show Laramie, and created dozens of girls' comics. He is a respected manga scholar, an expert on Japanese swords, a frustrated engineer and pilot who still wants to be a spaceman in his eighties. This collection of new essays--the first book on Matsumoto in English--covers his seven decades of comic creation, drawing on contemporary scholarship, artistic practice and fan studies to map Matsumoto's vast universe. The contributors--artists, creators, translators and scholars--mirror the range of his work and experience. From the bildungsroman to the importance of textual analysis for costume and performance, from early days in poverty to honors around the world, this volume offers previously unexplored biographical and bibliographic detail from a life story as thrilling as anything he created.

International Perspectives on Shojo and Shojo Manga

The Influence of Girl Culture

Author: Masami Toku

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 250

View: 630

This collaborative book explores the artistic and aesthetic development of shojo, or girl, manga and discusses the significance of both shojo manga and the concept of shojo, or girl culture. It features contributions from manga critics, educators, and researchers from both manga’s home country of Japan and abroad, looking at shojo and shojo manga’s influence both locally and globally. Finally, it presents original interviews of shojo manga-ka, or artists, who discuss their work and their views on this distinct type of popular visual culture.

Dragon Ball Culture Volume 1

Origin

Author: Derek Padula

Publisher: Derek Padula

ISBN:

Category: Comics & Graphic Novels

Page: 250

View: 367

See Dragon Ball with new eyes. This book is your cultural tour guide of Dragon Ball, the world’s most recognized anime and manga series. Over 11 years in development, at over 2,000 pages, and featuring over 1,800 unique terms, Dragon Ball Culture is a 7 Volume analysis of your favorite series. You will go on an adventure with Son Goku, from Chapter 1 to 194 of the original Dragon Ball series, as we explore every page, every panel, and every sentence, to reveal the hidden symbolism and deeper meaning of Dragon Ball. In Volume 1 you will discover the origin of Dragon Ball. How does Akira Toriyama get his big break and become a manga author? Why does he make Dragon Ball? Where does Dragon Ball’s culture come from? And why is it so successful? Along the way you’ll be informed, entertained, and inspired. You will learn more about your favorite series and about yourself. Now step with me through the doorway of Dragon Ball Culture.

Frommer's Japan Day by Day

Author: Matt Alt

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Travel

Page: 600

View: 153

Provides over eighty self-guided tours based on such interests as culture, sports, dining, nightlife, and island life, and features reviews of attractions, restaurants, shopping centers, and hotels.

Japanese Animation

East Asian Perspectives

Author: Masao Yokota

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 321

View: 172

Japanese Animation: East Asian Perspectives makes available for the first time to English readership a selection of viewpoints from media practitioners, designers, educators, and scholars working in the East Asian Pacific. This collection not only engages a multidisciplinary approach in understanding the subject of Japanese animation but also shows ways to research, teach, and more fully explore this multidimensional world. Presented in six sections, the translated essays cross-reference each other. The collection adopts a wide range of critical, historical, practical, and experimental approaches. This variety provides a creative and fascinating edge for both specialist and nonspecialist readers. Contributors’ works share a common relevance, interest, and involvement despite their regional considerations and the different modes of analysis demonstrated. They form a composite of teaching and research ideas on Japanese animation.

Global Manga

'Japanese' Comics without Japan?

Author: Casey Brienza

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 741

Outside Japan, the term ’manga’ usually refers to comics originally published in Japan. Yet nowadays many publications labelled ’manga’ are not translations of Japanese works but rather have been wholly conceived and created elsewhere. These comics, although often derided and dismissed as ’fake manga’, represent an important but understudied global cultural phenomenon which, controversially, may even point to a future of ’Japanese’ comics without Japan. This book takes seriously the political economy and cultural production of this so-called ’global manga’ produced throughout the Americas, Europe, and Asia and explores the conditions under which it arises and flourishes; what counts as ’manga’ and who gets to decide; the implications of global manga for contemporary economies of cultural and creative labour; the ways in which it is shaped by or mixes with local cultural forms and contexts; and, ultimately, what it means for manga to be ’authentically’ Japanese in the first place. Presenting new empirical research on the production of global manga culture from scholars across the humanities and social sciences, as well as first person pieces and historical overviews written by global manga artists and industry insiders, Global Manga will appeal to scholars of cultural and media studies, Japanese studies, and popular and visual culture.

Astro Boy and Anime Come to the Americas

An Insider’s View of the Birth of a Pop Culture Phenomenon

Author: Fred Ladd

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 222

View: 808

The first generation of American television programmers had few choices of Saturday morning children’s offerings. That changed dramatically in 1963 when a Japanese animated television series called Tetsuan Atom was acquired for distribution by NBC. Fred Ladd adapted the show for American television and—rechristened Astro Boy—it was an overnight sensation. Astro Boy’s popularity sparked a new industry importing animated television from Japan. Ladd went on to adapt numerous Japanese animated imports, and here provides an insider’s view of the creation of an ongoing cultural and media phenomenon.

Debating Otaku in Contemporary Japan

Historical Perspectives and New Horizons

Author: Patrick W. Galbraith

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 959

With the spread of manga (Japanese comics) and anime (Japanese cartoons) around the world, many have adopted the Japanese term 'otaku' to identify fans of such media. The connection to manga and anime may seem straightforward, but, when taken for granted, often serves to obscure the debates within and around media fandom in Japan since the term 'otaku' appeared in the niche publication Manga Burikko in 1983. Debating Otaku in Contemporary Japan disrupts the naturalization and trivialization of 'otaku' by examining the historical contingency of the term as a way to identify and contain problematic youth, consumers and fan cultures in Japan. Its chapters, many translated from Japanese and available in English for the first time – and with a foreword by Otsuka Eiji, former editor of Manga Burikko – explore key moments in the evolving discourse of 'otaku' in Japan. Rather than presenting a smooth, triumphant narrative of the transition of a subculture to the mainstream, the edited volume repositions 'otaku' in specific historical, social and economic contexts, providing new insights into the significance of the 'otaku' phenomenon in Japan and the world. By going back to original Japanese documents, translating key contributions by Japanese scholars and offering sustained analysis of these documents and scholars, Debating Otaku in Contemporary Japan provides alternative histories of and approaches to 'otaku'. For all students and scholars of contemporary Japan and the history of Japanese fan and consumer cultures, this volume will be a foundation for understanding how 'otaku', at different places and times and to different people, is meaningful.

Harbrace Essentials with Resources for Writing in the Disciplines

Author: Cheryl Glenn

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 592

View: 482

Ideal for reference in the classroom or office, this brief and easy-to-navigate handbook provides clear and concise grammar, style, mechanics, and punctuation information, as well as strategies for writing paragraphs and essays, conducting research, and documenting sources. Each student text is packaged with a free Cengage Essential Reference Card to the MLA HANDBOOK, Eighth Edition. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Harbrace Essentials, Spiral bound Version

Author: Cheryl Glenn

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 496

View: 943

Ideal for reference in the classroom or office, this brief and easy-to-navigate handbook provides clear and concise grammar, style, mechanics, and punctuation information, as well as strategies for writing paragraphs and essays, conducting research, and documenting sources. Each student text is packaged with a free Cengage Essential Reference Card to the MLA HANDBOOK, Eighth Edition. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

The Anime Machine

A Media Theory of Animation

Author: Thomas Lamarre

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 424

View: 735

Despite the longevity of animation and its significance within the history of cinema, film theorists have focused on live-action motion pictures and largely ignored hand-drawn and computer-generated movies. Thomas Lamarre contends that the history, techniques, and complex visual language of animation, particularly Japanese animation, demands serious and sustained engagement, and in The Anime Machine he lays the foundation for a new critical theory for reading Japanese animation, showing how anime fundamentally differs from other visual media. The Anime Machine defines the visual characteristics of anime and the meanings generated by those specifically “animetic” effects—the multiplanar image, the distributive field of vision, exploded projection, modulation, and other techniques of character animation—through close analysis of major films and television series, studios, animators, and directors, as well as Japanese theories of animation. Lamarre first addresses the technology of anime: the cells on which the images are drawn, the animation stand at which the animator works, the layers of drawings in a frame, the techniques of drawing and blurring lines, how characters are made to move. He then examines foundational works of anime, including the films and television series of Miyazaki Hayao and Anno Hideaki, the multimedia art of Murakami Takashi, and CLAMP’s manga and anime adaptations, to illuminate the profound connections between animators, characters, spectators, and technology. Working at the intersection of the philosophy of technology and the history of thought, Lamarre explores how anime and its related media entail material orientations and demonstrates concretely how the “animetic machine” encourages a specific approach to thinking about technology and opens new ways for understanding our place in the technologized world around us.