Impeached

The Trial of President Andrew Johnson and the Fight for Lincoln's Legacy

Author: David O. Stewart

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 447

View: 489

An account of the attempt to remove Andrew Johnson from the presidency. It demolishes the myth that Johnson's impeachment was unjustified.

Federal Service and the Constitution

The Development of the Public Employment Relationship, Second Edition

Author: David H. Rosenbloom

Publisher: Georgetown University Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 208

View: 477

Conceived during the turbulent period of the late 1960s when ‘rights talk’ was ubiquitous, Federal Service and the Constitution, a landmark study first published in 1971, strove to understand how the rights of federal civil servants had become so differentiated from those of ordinary citizens. Now in a new, second edition, this legal–historical analysis reviews and enlarges its look at the constitutional rights of federal employees from the nation's founding to the present. Thoroughly revised and updated, this highly readable history of the constitutional relationship between federal employees and the government describes how the changing political, administrative, and institutional concepts of what the federal service is or should be are related to the development of constitutional doctrines defining federal employees’ constitutional rights. Developments in society since 1971 have dramatically changed the federal bureaucracy, protecting and expanding employment rights, while at the same time Supreme Court decisions are eroding the special legal status of federal employees. Looking at the current status of these constitutional rights, Rosenbloom concludes by suggesting that recent Supreme Court decisions may reflect a shift to a model based on private sector practices.

Lincoln's Greatest Case: The River, the Bridge, and the Making of America

Author: Brian McGinty

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 941

The untold story of how one sensational trial propelled a self-taught lawyer and a future president into the national spotlight. In May of 1856, the steamboat Effie Afton barreled into a pillar of the Rock Island Bridge, unalterably changing the course of American transportation history. Within a year, long-simmering tensions between powerful steamboat interests and burgeoning railroads exploded, and the nation’s attention, absorbed by the Dred Scott case, was riveted by a new civil trial. Dramatically reenacting the Effie Afton case—from its unlikely inception, complete with a young Abraham Lincoln’s soaring oratory, to the controversial finale—this “masterful” (Christian Science Monitor) account gives us the previously untold story of how one sensational trial propelled a self-taught lawyer and a future president into the national spotlight.

The Constitution and the American Presidency

Author: Martin L. Fausold

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 323

View: 303

In this unusual and provocative volume, historians examine the presidencies of Jefferson, Jackson, Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, F. D. R., and Truman, while political scientists assess the contemporary presidency and suggest a range of reforms, from modest to radical, including fundamental alterations to the balance of power between the presidency and the Congress.

Compromise and the Constitution

The Political Thought of Henry Clay

Author: Kimberly C. Shankman

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 129

View: 845

Kimberly Shankman has written the first full-length study of the political thought of early American statesman Henry Clay. In Compromise and the Constitution, Shankman seeks to understand Clay's approach to republican statesmanship by carefully considering the context in which he developed and articulated his programs and policy prescriptions. Because Clay was policy-oriented and very seldom addressed politics from a theoretical perspective, there has been a tendency to dismiss him as motivated primarily, if not exclusively, by expedience and ambition. Shankman demonstrates, however, that Clay's reticence about first principles was in fact an integral part of his conception of an appropriate republican politics: one based on prudence, interest, and compromise rather than on principle, passion, and adamancy. This book is crucial reading for scholars of American history, early American political thought, and the Constitution.

The Union As It Is

Constitutional Unionism and Sectional Compromise, 1787-1861

Author: Peter B. Knupfer

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 512

The first scholar to trace the meaning and importance of the idea of political compromise from the founding of the Republic to the onset of the Civil War, Knupfer shows how recurring justifications of sectional compromise reflected common ideas about the way governments were supposed to work. Originally published in 1991. A UNC Press Enduring Edition -- UNC Press Enduring Editions use the latest in digital technology to make available again books from our distinguished backlist that were previously out of print. These editions are published unaltered from the original, and are presented in affordable paperback formats, bringing readers both historical and cultural value.

Andrew Jackson and the Rise of the Democrats: A Reference Guide

A Reference Guide

Author: Mark R. Cheathem Ph.D.

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 309

View: 442

This illuminating overview explains political parties in the early 19th century, comparing and contrasting that era with the modern-day political climate. • Provides biographical sketches of prominent Democratic figures • Includes comprehensive coverage of political parties between the Revolution and the Civil War • Features an essay from a Jacksonian-era political expert • Incorporates the most recent scholarship to help explain the Democrats' rise to power

The Age of Jackson and the Art of American Power, 1815-1848

Author: William R. Nester

Publisher: Potomac Books, Inc.

ISBN:

Category: BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY

Page: 361

View: 923

As William Nester asserts in The Age of Jackson, it takes quite a leader to personify an age. A political titan for thirty-three years (1815-1848), Andrew Jackson possessed character, beliefs, and acts that dominated American politics. Although Jackson returned to his Tennessee plantation in March 1837 after serving eight years as president, he continued to overshadow American politics. Two of his proteges, Martin the Magician van Buren and James Young Hickory Polk, followed him to the White House and pursued his agenda. Jackson provoked firestorms of political passions throughout his era. Far more people loved than hated him, but the fervor was just as pitched either way. Although the passions have subsided, the debate lingers. Historians are split over Jackson's legacy. Some extol him as among America's greatest presidents, citing his championing of the common man, holding the country together during the nullification crisis, and eliminating the national debt. Others excoriate him as a mean-spirited despot who shredded the Constitution and damaged the nation's development by destroying the Second Bank of the United States, defying the Supreme Court, and grossly worsening political corruption through his spoils system. Still others condemn his forcibly expelling more than forty thousand Native Americans from their homes and along the Trail of Tears, which led far west of the Mississippi River, with thousands perishing along the way. In his clear-eyed assessment of one of the most divisive leaders in American history, Nester provides new insight into the age-old debate about the very nature of power itself.