A 1950s Irish Childhood

From Catapults to Communion Medals

Author: Ruth Illingworth

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 228

1950s Ireland was the age of De Valera and John Charles McQuaid. It was the age before television, Vatican II, and home central heating. A time when motor cars and public telephones had wind-up handles, when boys wore short trousers and girls wore ribbons, when nuns wore white bonnets and priests wore black hats in church. To the young people of today, the 1950s seem like another age. But for those who played, learned and worked at this time, this era feels like just yesterday. This delightful collection of memories will appeal to all who grew up in 1950s Ireland and will jog memories about all aspects of life as it was.

An Irish childhood

Author: Alexander Norman Jeffares

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 384

View: 559

So Long to Wait

An Irish Childhood

Author: Moira Verschoyle

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Ireland

Page: 180

View: 550

Modern Irish Writers

A Bio-critical Sourcebook

Author: Alexander G. Gonzalez

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 457

View: 841

Entries present biographical, critical, and bibliographical information for more than 70 modern Irish writers.

You'll Ruin your Dinner: Sweet Memories from Irish childhood

Author: Damian Corless

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 508

Whether your taste was for fiddlestix or Flavour Ravers, Trigger bars or Two and Twos, Marathons or macaroons, Peggy's Legs or Push Pops, Liquorice Allsorts or Little Devils, You'll Ruin Your Dinner has something for you. From the heyday of Cleeve's toffee to the birth of the Tayto Cheese & Onion crisp, it transports us back to the days when sweet shop windows across the country boasted tempting confectionery displays, when summer was heralded with a visit from the ice-cream cart, and when Grafton Street was the sweet shop capital of Ireland. And then there was the golden age of Irish-made sweets, when the entire nation downed tools to listen to Fry-Cadbury's soap The Kennedys of Castleross and Gay Byrne cut his teeth on The Urney Programme. The next three decades brought enduring favourites along with fleeting fads, but the craving for a sugar-rush remained steadfast for generations of Irish kids to come. These mouth-watering memories are captured here across the decades in an assortment that will keep you dipping back in for more - and it won't ruin your dinner.

Boy Wonder

Tales from the Sidelines of an Irish Childhood

Author: Dave Hannigan

Publisher: Gill & Macmillan Ltd

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 256

View: 624

A collage of personal memories passed over into family myth, Boy Wonder is a funny and moving account of a childhood spent, like countless others, on pitches, sidelines and stands, struggling to make sense of competition and the outsized role it plays in the lives of men and boys, fathers and sons. From tough lessons on the parish field and the politics of afterschool football to the euphoria of Croke Park and brushes with demigods like Jimmy Barry-Murphy and Roy Keane, Boy Wonder is a poignant comic memoir about family, sport and the rites of passage that shape every childhood. It is one man’s story – but a testament to every man’s experience. ‘If you ever strung a length of washing line across the road to try to replicate the excitement of Wimbledon, played street football while imagining John Motson simpering over your every touch, trotted around an obstacle course slapping your backside during Dublin Horse Show week or tried to emulate Alex Higgins on a four-foot by two-foot snooker table in the tight confines of a suburban kitchen, then Boy Wonder will make you ache with nostalgia for your own childhood.’ Paul Howard ‘Utterly authentic.’ Matt Cooper

Con's Gang

Tales of an Irish Childhood

Author: P. J. Shannon

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 144

View: 711

Research with Children

Perspectives and Practices

Author: Pia Christensen

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 228

View: 751

The entirely revised third edition of Research with Children forms a unique resource book on the methodology of childhood research with a core emphasis on theory driven practices. As in the previous two editions, this edition presents particular standpoints in the field, whilst also reflecting the latest developments in the now well-established interdisciplinary field of childhood studies. A rich collection of contributions from leading researchers across a range of disciplinary backgrounds, research practices and theoretical perspectives discuss central questions of epistemology and methodology, demonstrating the links between theory and practice. This edition includes exciting new chapters on: Internet-based research and contemporary technology, Family based research, Children as researchers, Participatory research in the global context, New directions for childhood research. Both theoretical and practical questions are set out in a well-argued fashion that enables easier navigation through the various complexities of the epistemological and methodological questions arising in contemporary research practices with children. As such, this text will appeal to both the newcomer to childhood studies and to experienced researchers in the field. With fully updated chapters, new material and a revised, clearer structure, this new edition will be a valuable resource for researchers working with children.

The Irish Voice in America

250 Years of Irish-American Fiction

Author: Charles Fanning

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 448

View: 310

In this study, Charles Fanning has written the first general account of the origins and development of a literary tradition among American writers of Irish birth or background who have explored the Irish immigrant or ethnic experience in works of fiction. The result is a portrait of the evolving fictional self-consciousness of an immigrant group over a span of 250 years. Fanning traces the roots of Irish-American writing back to the eighteenth century and carries it forward through the traumatic years of the Famine to the present time with an intensely productive period in the twentieth century beginning with James T. Farrell. Later writers treated in depth include Edwin O'Connor, Elizabeth Cullinan, Maureen Howard, and William Kennedy. Along the way he places in the historical record many all but forgotten writers, including the prolific Mary Ann Sadlier. The Irish Voice in America is not only a highly readable contribution to American literary history but also a valuable reference to many writers and their works. For this second edition, Fanning has added a chapter that covers the fiction of the past decade. He argues that contemporary writers continue to draw on Ireland as a source and are important chroniclers of the modern American experience.