An Irish Childhood

Author: Elizabeth Hamilton

Publisher: London : Chatto & Windus

ISBN:

Category: Ireland

Page: 212

View: 786

An Irish childhood

Author: Alexander Norman Jeffares

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 384

View: 117

An Irish Childhood

Author: Peter Somerville-Large

Publisher: Constable

ISBN:

Category: Ireland

Page: 246

View: 956

Peter Somerville-Large grew up with his brother Phil in a nursery world at the top of a smart house in Dublin from which they could watch Fitzwilliam Place far below, with the horse drawn delivery vans, the animals being driven to market and their father's patients arriving to visit the consulting rooms on the ground floor. The family had houses in the country too, with livestock and vegetable gardens and a bevy of eccentric relations, among them Edith Somerville (of Somerville and Ross fame). When Peter was five, his father bought an island - 80 bare rocky acres on the north shore of the Kenmare River in County Kerry - which he saw as paradise. There were parties, sailing trips and fishing expeditions. This biography takes the reader back to the sensations and excitements of children, and paints a picture of a world at once so recent and yet now vanished.

An Irish Childhood

Author: Mary Mccann

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 164

View: 208

Mary McCann was born in Northern Ireland in the 1920's the third child in a large, poor, rural Irish family. Her journey was hard, often disappointing and above all challenging. As a young woman she moved to North London, married and later moved to Bournemouth. She died in 2006. This is her story.

A 1950s Irish Childhood

From Catapults to Communion Medals

Author: Ruth Illingworth

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 152

1950s Ireland was the age of De Valera and John Charles McQuaid. It was the age before television, Vatican II, and home central heating. A time when motor cars and public telephones had wind-up handles, when boys wore short trousers and girls wore ribbons, when nuns wore white bonnets and priests wore black hats in church. To the young people of today, the 1950s seem like another age. But for those who played, learned and worked at this time, this era feels like just yesterday. This delightful collection of memories will appeal to all who grew up in 1950s Ireland and will jog memories about all aspects of life as it was.

Modern Irish Writers

A Bio-critical Sourcebook

Author: Alexander G. Gonzalez

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 457

View: 417

Entries present biographical, critical, and bibliographical information for more than 70 modern Irish writers.

So Long to Wait

An Irish Childhood

Author: Moira Verschoyle

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Ireland

Page: 180

View: 597

Tom Kipper's Schooldays

Memories of an Irish Childhood in Liverpool

Author: Peter Sale

Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 247

View: 944

Nab End meets Our Kid meets Bread in this nostalgic, funny and poignant account of growing up in Liverpool during the Second World War Meet Tom Kipper, Espionage Agent Extraordinaire. Born into a poor Irish family in Liverpool in 1928, Tom Kipper is ten years old and full of mischief. A pupil at Saint Joseph's Academy of Hard Knocks (as the kids call it), he spends his days dodging Spiderlady McCann's vicious pencil and engaging in a good scrap when school's out. But the arrival of war will shake Tom's world, bringing loss, confusion and further adventure...

You'll Ruin your Dinner: Sweet Memories from Irish childhood

Author: Damian Corless

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 728

Whether your taste was for fiddlestix or Flavour Ravers, Trigger bars or Two and Twos, Marathons or macaroons, Peggy's Legs or Push Pops, Liquorice Allsorts or Little Devils, You'll Ruin Your Dinner has something for you. From the heyday of Cleeve's toffee to the birth of the Tayto Cheese & Onion crisp, it transports us back to the days when sweet shop windows across the country boasted tempting confectionery displays, when summer was heralded with a visit from the ice-cream cart, and when Grafton Street was the sweet shop capital of Ireland. And then there was the golden age of Irish-made sweets, when the entire nation downed tools to listen to Fry-Cadbury's soap The Kennedys of Castleross and Gay Byrne cut his teeth on The Urney Programme. The next three decades brought enduring favourites along with fleeting fads, but the craving for a sugar-rush remained steadfast for generations of Irish kids to come. These mouth-watering memories are captured here across the decades in an assortment that will keep you dipping back in for more - and it won't ruin your dinner.