An Introduction to Knot Theory

Author: W.B.Raymond Lickorish

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 204

View: 615

A selection of topics which graduate students have found to be a successful introduction to the field, employing three distinct techniques: geometric topology manoeuvres, combinatorics, and algebraic topology. Each topic is developed until significant results are achieved and each chapter ends with exercises and brief accounts of the latest research. What may reasonably be referred to as knot theory has expanded enormously over the last decade and, while the author describes important discoveries throughout the twentieth century, the latest discoveries such as quantum invariants of 3-manifolds as well as generalisations and applications of the Jones polynomial are also included, presented in an easily intelligible style. Readers are assumed to have knowledge of the basic ideas of the fundamental group and simple homology theory, although explanations throughout the text are numerous and well-done. Written by an internationally known expert in the field, this will appeal to graduate students, mathematicians and physicists with a mathematical background wishing to gain new insights in this area.

Introduction to Knot Theory

Author: R. H. Crowell

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 182

View: 397

Knot theory is a kind of geometry, and one whose appeal is very direct because the objects studied are perceivable and tangible in everyday physical space. It is a meeting ground of such diverse branches of mathematics as group theory, matrix theory, number theory, algebraic geometry, and differential geometry, to name some of the more prominent ones. It had its origins in the mathematical theory of electricity and in primitive atomic physics, and there are hints today of new applications in certain branches of chemistryJ The outlines of the modern topological theory were worked out by Dehn, Alexander, Reidemeister, and Seifert almost thirty years ago. As a subfield of topology, knot theory forms the core of a wide range of problems dealing with the position of one manifold imbedded within another. This book, which is an elaboration of a series of lectures given by Fox at Haverford College while a Philips Visitor there in the spring of 1956, is an attempt to make the subject accessible to everyone. Primarily it is a text book for a course at the junior-senior level, but we believe that it can be used with profit also by graduate students. Because the algebra required is not the familiar commutative algebra, a disproportionate amount of the book is given over to necessary algebraic preliminaries.

Knot Theory

Author: Charles Livingston

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 240

View: 935

This book uses only linear algebra and basic group theory to study the properties of knots.

A Basic Course in Algebraic Topology

Author: William S. Massey

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 428

View: 451

This textbook is intended for a course in algebraic topology at the beginning graduate level. The main topics covered are the classification of compact 2-manifolds, the fundamental group, covering spaces, singular homology theory, and singular cohomology theory. These topics are developed systematically, avoiding all unnecessary definitions, terminology, and technical machinery. The text consists of material from the first five chapters of the author's earlier book, Algebraic Topology; an Introduction (GTM 56) together with almost all of his book, Singular Homology Theory (GTM 70). The material from the two earlier books has been substantially revised, corrected, and brought up to date.

An Introduction to the Theory of Groups

Author: Joseph Rotman

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 517

View: 553

Anyone who has studied abstract algebra and linear algebra as an undergraduate can understand this book. The first six chapters provide material for a first course, while the rest of the book covers more advanced topics. This revised edition retains the clarity of presentation that was the hallmark of the previous editions. From the reviews: "Rotman has given us a very readable and valuable text, and has shown us many beautiful vistas along his chosen route." --MATHEMATICAL REVIEWS

A Survey of Knot Theory

Author: Akio Kawauchi

Publisher: Birkhäuser

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 423

View: 430

Knot theory is a rapidly developing field of research with many applications, not only for mathematics. The present volume, written by a well-known specialist, gives a complete survey of this theory from its very beginnings to today's most recent research results. An indispensable book for everyone concerned with knot theory.

Applications of Knot Theory

American Mathematical Society, Short Course, January 4-5, 2008, San Diego, California

Author: American Mathematical Society. Short course

Publisher: American Mathematical Soc.

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 186

View: 392

This volume, based on a 2008 AMS Short Course, offers a crash course in knot theory that will stimulate further study of this exciting field. Three introductory chapters are followed by three more advanced chapters examining applications of knot theory to physics, the use of topology in DNA nanotechnology, and the statistical and energetic properties of knots and their relation to molecular biology. The book offers a useful bridge from early graduate school topics to more advanced applications.

High-dimensional Knot Theory

Algebraic Surgery in Codimension 2

Author: Andrew Ranicki

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 646

View: 874

Bringing together many results previously scattered throughout the research literature into a single framework, this work concentrates on the application of the author's algebraic theory of surgery to provide a unified treatment of the invariants of codimension 2 embeddings, generalizing the Alexander polynomials and Seifert forms of classical knot theory.

Classical Topology and Combinatorial Group Theory

Author:

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 301

View: 910

In recent years, many students have been introduced to topology in high school mathematics. Having met the Mobius band, the seven bridges of Konigsberg, Euler's polyhedron formula, and knots, the student is led to expect that these picturesque ideas will come to full flower in university topology courses. What a disappointment "undergraduate topology" proves to be! In most institutions it is either a service course for analysts, on abstract spaces, or else an introduction to homological algebra in which the only geometric activity is the completion of commutative diagrams. Pictures are kept to a minimum, and at the end the student still does not understand the simplest topological facts, such as the reason why knots exist. In my opinion, a well-balanced introduction to topology should stress its intuitive geometric aspect, while admitting the legitimate interest that analysts and algebraists have in the subject. At any rate, this is the aim of the present book. In support of this view, I have followed the historical develop ment where practicable, since it clearly shows the influence of geometric thought at all stages. This is not to claim that topology received its main impetus from geometric recrea. ions like the seven bridges; rather, it resulted from the visualization of problems from other parts of mathematics complex analysis (Riemann), mechanics (poincare), and group theory (Oehn). It is these connections to other parts of mathematics which make topology an important as well as a beautiful subject.