An Illustrated History of the Herbals

Author: Frank J. Anderson

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN:

Category: Gardening

Page: 270

View: 790

This book is a fascinating and beautifully illustrated history of herbal texts throughout the world from ancient cultures through the seventeenth century. An “herbal” by definition is a book that is descriptive of plants and the term did not come into use until the sixteenth century. The production of herbals is closely connected to the history of early printing and offers the finest examples of this art and craft. However, the earliest records of ancient Egypt, Sumer and China all reflect a tradition of works of botanicals and their medicinal properties long before printing. The author’s survey begins with a work called De materia medica written in the first century which is extant and, as the final authority on pharmacy for 1500 years, is the most important herbal ever written. The study of herbals offers a rich history of the culture and beliefs from the folklore and science of medieval and classical worlds.

Reader's Guide to the History of Science

Author: Arne Hessenbruch

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 965

View: 266

The Reader's Guide to the History of Science looks at the literature of science in some 550 entries on individuals (Einstein), institutions and disciplines (Mathematics), general themes (Romantic Science) and central concepts (Paradigm and Fact). The history of science is construed widely to include the history of medicine and technology as is reflected in the range of disciplines from which the international team of 200 contributors are drawn.

Locus Amoenus

Gardens and Horticulture in the Renaissance

Author: Alexander Samson

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Gardening

Page: 200

View: 963

"Originally published as volume 25, issue 1 of Renaissance studies"--T.p. verso.

The History of Pharmacy

A Selected Annotated Bibliography

Author: Gregory Higby

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 334

View: 940

Originally published in 1995, The History of Pharmacy is a critical bibliography of selected information on the history of pharmacy. The book is designed to guide students and academics through the history of science and technology. Topics range from medicine, chemical technology and the economics and business of pharmacy to pharmacy’s influence in the arts. The bibliography includes an exhaustive selection of primary and secondary sources and is arranged chronologically. This book will be of interest to those researching in the area of the history of science and technology and will appeal to students and academic researchers alike.

How to Do It

Guides to Good Living for Renaissance Italians

Author: Rudolph M. Bell

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 389

View: 203

How to Do It shows us sixteenth-century Italy from an entirely new perspective: through manuals which were staples in the households of middlebrow Italians merely trying to lead better lives. Addressing challenges such as how to conceive a boy, the manuals offered suggestions such as tying a tourniquet around your husband's left testicle. Or should you want to goad female desires, throw 90 grubs in a liter of olive oil, let steep in the sun for a week and apply liberally on the male anatomy. Bell's journey through booklets long dismissed by scholars as being of little literary value gives us a refreshing and surprisingly fun social history. "Lively and curious reading, particularly in its cascade of anecdote, offered in a breezy, cozy, journalistic style." —Lauro Martines, Times Literary Supplement "[Bell's] fascinating book is a window on a lost world far nearer to our own than we might imagine. . . . How pleasant to read his delightful, informative and often hilarious book." —Kate Saunders, The Independent "An extraordinary work which blends the learned with the frankly bizarre." —The Economist "Professor Bell has a sly sense of humor and an enviably strong stomach. . . . He wants to know how people actually behaved, not how the Church or philosophers or earnest humanists thought they should behave. I loved this book." —Christopher Stace, Daily Telegraph

Sweet Herbs and Sundry Flowers

Medieval Gardens and the Gardens of the Cloisters

Author: Tania Bayard

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Cloisters Gardens (New York, N.Y.)

Page: 97

View: 569

Herbal Medicine and Botanical Medical Fads

Author: Frank Hoffmann

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 258

View: 226

Find all the information you need on herbs and spices in one place! Herbal Medicine and Botanical Medical Fads is an A-to-Z reference book written in a straightforward style that’s informative enough for library use but informal enough for general reading. This essential guide takes a practical look at the popular uses of herbs and spices, presented in an easy-to-use format. The book is a refreshing alternative to the how-to guides, cookbooks, and picture books usually found on the subject. From alfalfa to ginseng to yellow dock, more than 100 entries are included, featuring historical backgrounds, popular and practical uses, folklore, and bibliographies. Herbal Medicine and Botanical Medical Fads also contains related listings and essays that range from alternative medicine to food preparation and nutrition to herbs in wedding celebrations. Detailed enough for reference use by academics, the book has a natural tone that appeals to garden club members, herb and spice experts, hobbyists, and others. Herbal Medicine and Botanical Medical Fads also includes information on: herb growing and marketing herbs and spices in literature medicinal herbs and spices federal regulations on herbs and spices horticulture therapy An everyday guide for enthusiasts and a perfect place to start for newcomers, Herbal Medicine and Botanical Medical Fads is an easy-to-use handbook with wide-ranging appeal. It combines the comprehensive information you’d expect from a reference book with a casual and colorful look at the histories and backgrounds of herbs and spices, both commonplace and exotic. As a vital resource or an occasional reference, this book is unique in its scope and invaluable in its usefulness.

Visualizing Medieval Medicine and Natural History, 1200–1550

Author: Jean A. Givens

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 622

Images in medieval and early modern treatises on medicine, pharmacy, and natural history often confound our expectations about the functions of medical and scientific illustrations. They do not look very much like the things they purport to portray; and their actual usefulness in everyday medical practice or teaching is not obvious. By looking at works as diverse as herbals, jewellery, surgery manuals, lay health guides, cinquecento paintings, manuscripts of Pliny's Natural History, and Leonardo's notebooks, Visualizing Medieval Medicine and Natural History, 1200-1550 addresses fundamental questions about the interplay of art and science from the thirteenth to the mid-sixteenth century: What counts as a medical illustration in the Middle Ages? What are the purposes and audiences of the illustrations in medieval medical, pharmaceutical, and natural history texts? How are images used to clarify, expand, authenticate, and replace these texts? How do images of natural objects, observed phenomena, and theoretical concepts amplify texts and convey complex cultural attitudes? What features lead us to regard some of these images as typically 'medieval' while other exactly contemporary images strike us as 'Renaissance' or 'early modern' in character? Art historians, medical historians, historians of science, and specialists in manuscripts and early printed books will welcome this wide-ranging, interdisciplinary examination of the role of visualization in early scientific inquiry.