An Atlas of Tolkien

An Illustrated Exploration of Tolkien's World

Author: David Day

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 256

View: 611

This lavish, colour atlas is a complete guide to the weird and wonderful geography of Tolkien's world. Packed with full page maps and illustrations of events in the annals of Middle-earth, it is the perfect companion to the bestselling A Dictionary of Tolkien. This book is unofficial and is not authorised by the Tolkien Estate or HarperCollins Publishers.

The Atlas of Middle-earth

Author: Karen Wynn Fonstad

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 224

View: 699

Karen Wynn Fonstad's THE ATLAS OF MIDDLE-EARTH is an essential volume that will enchant all Tolkien fans. Here is the definitive guide to the geography of Middle-earth, from its founding in the Elder Days through the Third Age, including the journeys of Bilbo, Frodo, and the Fellowship of the Ring. Authentic and updated -- nearly one third of the maps are new, and the text is fully revised -- the atlas illuminates the enchanted world created in THE SILMARILLION, THE HOBBIT, and THE LORD OF THE RINGS. Hundreds of two-color maps and diagrams survey the journeys of the principal characters day by day -- including all the battles and key locations of the First, Second, and Third Ages. Plans and descriptions of castles, buildings, and distinctive landforms are given, along with thematic maps describing the climate, vegetation, languages, and population distribution of Middle-earth throughout its history. An extensive appendix and an index help readers correlate the maps with Tolkien's novels.

The Atlas of TolkienâÂeÂ(tm)s Middle-Earth

Author: Karen Wynn Fonstad

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 224

View: 824

Find your way through every part of J.R.R. Tolkienâe(tm)s great creation, from the Middle-earth of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings to the undying lands of the Westâe¦ The Atlas of Tolkienâe(tm)s Middle-earth is an essential guide to the geography of Middle-earth, from its founding in the Elder Days âe" as recounted in The Silmarillion âe" to the Third Age of The Lord of the Rings, including the journeys of Bilbo, Frodo and the Fellowship of the Ring. Hundreds of maps and diagrams survey the journeys of the principal characters day by day âe" including all the battles and key locations of the First, Second and Third Ages. Plans and descriptions of castles, buildings and distinctive landforms accompany thematic maps describing climate, vegetation, languages and population throughout the history of Middle-earth.

An Atlas of Tolkien

Author:

Publisher: Bounty Books

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 256

View: 829

This lavish, colour atlas is a complete guide to the weird and wonderful geography of Tolkien's world. Packed with full page maps and illustrations of events in the annals of Middle-earth, it is the perfect companion to the bestselling A Dictionary of Tolkien. This book is unofficial and is not authorised by the Tolkien Estate or HarperCollins Publishers.

Journeys of Frodo

An Atlas of J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings

Author: Barbara Strachey

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Fantasy fiction, English

Page: 112

View: 599

An atlas of 51 maps charting the journey that Frodo and his companions undertake in J.R.R.Tolkien's epic work. Based on clear and detailed descriptions given in the text and on the original maps that appear in The Lord of the Rings, as well as Tolkien's own paintings and drawings of the landscape and features of Middle-earth, this book clearly shows Frodo's route, together with the paths taken by other principal characters. The two-colour maps provide enough detail to help the reader envisage the country through which the narrative moves, and each one also has extensive notes about the journey. Having loved the volumes of The Lord of the Rings since they first appeared, Barbara Strachey long wanted fuller and more detailed maps to go with them. Though not a professional cartographer or artist, she finally decided to create them herself. For nearly 20 years her efforts have provided readers of The Lord of the Rings with a new and more vivid idea of Middle-earth, and her book remains an essential companion to Tolkien's great masterpiece.

J.R.R. Tolkien Encyclopedia

Scholarship and Critical Assessment

Author: Michael D. C. Drout

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 774

View: 331

A detailed work of reference and scholarship, this one volume Encyclopedia includes discussions of all the fundamental issues in Tolkien scholarship written by the leading scholars in the field. Coverage not only presents the most recent scholarship on J.R.R. Tolkien, but also introduces and explores the author and scholar's life and work within their historical and cultural contexts. Tolkien's fiction and his sources of influence are examined along with his artistic and academic achievements - including his translations of medieval texts - teaching posts, linguistic works, and the languages he created. The 550 alphabetically arranged entries fall within the following categories of topics: adaptations art and illustrations characters in Tolkien's work critical history and scholarship influence of Tolkien languages biography literary sources literature creatures and peoples of Middle-earth objects in Tolkien's work places in Tolkien's work reception of Tolkien medieval scholars scholarship by Tolkien medieval literature stylistic elements themes in Tolkien's works theological/ philosophical concepts and philosophers Tolkien's contemporary history and culture works of literature

Reading and Interpreting the Works of J.R.R. Tolkien

Author: Greg Clinton

Publisher: Enslow Publishing, LLC

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 176

View: 756

The world of J.R.R. Tolkien is one that is inhabited by hobbits, dwarves, elves, wizards, and dragons. As a young man, Tolkien created his very own language, and from there he went on to imagine an entire magical world and its detailed history. Students will take an in-depth and thought-provoking look at The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, as well as The Simarillion, which provides the foundation for his classic works. The text includes an insightful analysis of the major themes and characters of the works that continue to fascinate new generations of readers.

Utopian and Dystopian Themes in Tolkien’s Legendarium

Author: Mark Doyle

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 204

View: 441

Utopia and Dystopia in Tolkien’s Legendarium explores how Tolkien’s works speak to many modern people’s utopian desires despite the overwhelming dominance of dystopian literature in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. It also examines how Tolkien’s malevolent societies in his legendarium have the unique ability to capture the fears and doubts that many people sense about the trajectory of modern society. Tolkien’s works do this by creating utopian and dystopian longing while also rejecting the stilted conventions of most literary utopias and dystopias. Utopia and Dystopia in Tolkien’s Legendarium traces these utopian and dystopian motifs through a variety of Tolkien’s works including The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, The Silmarillion, Book of Lost Tales, Leaf by Niggle, and some of his early poetry. The book analyzes Tolkien’s ideal and evil societies from a variety of angles: political and literary theory, the sources of Tolkien’s narratives, the influence of environmentalism and Catholic social doctrine, Tolkien’s theories about and use of myth, and finally the relationship between Tolkien’s politics and his theories of leadership. The book’s epilogue looks at Tolkien’s works compared to popular culture adaptations of his legendarium.

The Hobbit and Tolkienäó»s Mythology

Essays on Revisions and Influences

Author: Bradford Lee Eden

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 244

View: 464

At the 2013 “Celebrating The Hobbit” conference at Valparaiso University—marking the 75th anniversary of the book’s publication and the first installment of Peter Jackson’s Hobbit movies—two plenary papers were presented: “Anchoring the Myth: The Impact of The Hobbit on Tolkien’s Legendarium” by John D. Rateliff provided numerous examples of The Hobbit’s influence on Tolkien’s legendarium; and “Tolkien’s French Connections” by Verlyn Flieger discussed French influences on the development of Bilbo Baggins and his adventures. In discussions with the plenary speakers and other presenters, it became apparent that a book focusing on how The Hobbit influenced the subsequent development of Tolkien’s legendarium was sorely needed. This collection of 15 previously unpublished essays fills that need. With Rateliff’s and Flieger’s papers included, the book presents two chapters on the Evolution of the Dwarven Race, two chapters on Durin’s Day examining the Dwarven lunar calendar, and 11 chapters on themes exploring various topics on influences and revisions between The Hobbit and Tolkien’s legendarium.

Reading and Mapping Fiction

Spatialising the Literary Text

Author: Sally Bushell

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 300

View: 501

This book explores the power of the map in fiction and its centrality to meaning, from Treasure Island to Winnie-the-Pooh.

Approaches to Teaching Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings and Other Works

Author: Leslie A. Donovan

Publisher: Modern Language Association

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 304

View: 668

A philologist and medieval scholar, J. R. R. Tolkien never intended to write immensely popular literature that would challenge traditional ideas about the nature of great literature and that was worthy of study in colleges across the world. He set out only to write a good story, the kind of story he and his friends would enjoy reading. In The Hobbit and in The Lord of the Rings, Tolkien created an entire world informed by his vast knowledge of mythology, languages, and medieval literature. In the 1960s, his books unexpectedly gained cult status with a new generation of young, countercultural readers. Today, the readership for Tolkien's absorbing secondary world--filled with monsters, magic, adventure, sacrifice, and heroism--continues to grow. Part 1 of this volume, "Materials," introduces instructors to the rich array of resources available for teaching Tolkien, including editions and criticism of his fiction and scholarship, historical material on his life and times, audiovisual materials, and film adaptations of his fiction. The essays in part 2, "Approaches," help instructors introduce students to critical debates around Tolkien's work, its sources, its influence, and its connection to ecology, religion, and science. Contributors draw on interdisciplinary approaches to outline strategies for teaching Tolkien in a wide variety of classroom contexts.

Tolkien Boxed Set

Author: David Day

Publisher: Thunder Bay Press

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 1504

View: 943

A must-have collection covering the lands and inhabitants of Middle-earth. The fantasy world of J. R. R. Tolkien’s Middle-earth contains a rich assortment of people, cities, powers, and creatures—as well as a deep, intertwined history that spans thousands of years. In these specially designed volumes, best-selling author and Tolkien scholar David Day presents four decades of research and writing on the lands and inhabitants of Middle-earth. A must-have guide to the Tolkien world, this collection provides an A-to-Z dictionary of the vernacular, an atlas describing the various terra firma, histories of battles, dark powers, heroes, and the Hobbits that started it all. More than 200 black-and-white and full-color illustrations make the pages a joy to behold as you learn all you’ll need to know about Tolkien’s fantasy realm. This work is unofficial and is not authorized by the Tolkien Estate or HarperCollins Publishers.

Tolkien and C.S. Lewis

The Gift of Friendship

Author: Colin Duriez

Publisher: Paulist Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 244

View: 939

Reveals the complex friendship between the two literary figures, noting their shared academic experiences at Oxford University, Lewis's influence on Tolkien's completion of The Lord of the Rings, and the differences in their temperaments and spiritual beliefs. Original.

Women in American Cartography

An Invisible Social History

Author: Judith Tyner

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 150

View: 253

Although women have been involved in mapping throughout history, their story has largely been hidden. The standard histories of cartography have focused on men. A woman’s name is rarely found. In Women in American Cartography, Judith Tyner argues that women were not deliberately erased but overlooked because of the types of maps they made and the jobs they held.Tyner looks at over fifty women exemplars in American cartography and their maps. She looks at teachers who made school atlases in the early nineteenth century; at pictorial mapmakers and book illustrators who created popular maps; at women who pioneered social and persuasive mapping, promoting causes such as suffrage; at women travelers who recorded their trips and mapped unexplored places; at women whose maps helped win Word War II; at women academics who studied, taught, and wrote about cartographic theory at colleges and universities; and at women who worked in government agencies and commercial mapping companies. These are just a few of the stories of women in American cartography.

Lord of the Rings

The Mythology of Power

Author: Jane Chance

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 184

View: 980

" With New Line Cinema's production of The Lord of the Rings film trilogy, the popularity of the works of J.R.R. Tolkien is unparalleled. Tolkien’s books continue to be bestsellers decades after their original publication. An epic in league with those of Spenser and Malory, The Lord of the Rings trilogy, begun during Hitler’s rise to power, celebrates the insignificant individual as hero in the modern world. Jane Chance’s critical appraisal of Tolkien’s heroic masterwork is the first to explore its “mythology of power”–that is, how power, politics, and language interact. Chance looks beyond the fantastic, self-contained world of Middle-earth to the twentieth-century parallels presented in the trilogy.

The Worlds of J. R. R. Tolkien

The Places That Inspired Middle-earth

Author: John Garth

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 208

View: 150

An illustrated journey into the life and imagination of one of the world's best-loved authors, Tolkien's Worlds provides a unique exploration of the relationship between the real and the fantastical and is an essential companion for anyone who wants to follow in Tolkien's footsteps.

Geographic Information

Author: Jenny Marie Johnson

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 216

View: 883

Explores geographic information available through several sources including the Internet and satellite technology, covering such topics as map basics, geographic information systems, and geographical standards.

J.R.R. Tolkien

A Guide for the Perplexed

Author: Toby Widdicombe

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 208

View: 944

With his richly detailed world of Middle Earth and the epic tales he told around it, J.R.R. Tolkien invented the modern fantasy novel. For readers and students getting to grips with this world for the first time, J.R.R. Tolkien: A Guide for the Perplexed is an essential guide to the author's life and work. The book helps readers explore: · Tolkien's life and times · Tolkien's mythical world · The languages of Middle Earth · The major works – The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings · Posthumously published writings – from The Silmarillion to the recently discovered The Fall of Gondolin With reference to adaptations of Tolkien's work including the Peter Jackson films, notes on Tolkien's sources and surveys of key scholarly and critical writings, this is an accessible and authoritative guide to one of the 20th century's greatest and most popular writers.

Tolkien's Art

A Mythology for England

Author: Jane Chance

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 262

View: 264

An incisive reinterpretation of New Deal diplomacy.

Middle-earth and Beyond

Essays on the World of J. R. R. Tolkien

Author: Janka Kaščáková

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 160

View: 961

One wonders whether there really is a need for another volume of essays on the works of J. R. R. Tolkien. Clearly there is. Especially when the volume takes new directions, employs new approaches, focuses on different texts, or reviews and then challenges received wisdom. This volume intends to do all that. The entries on sources and analogues in The Lord of the Rings, a favorite topic, are still able to take new directions. The analyses of Tolkien’s literary art, less common in Tolkien criticism, focus on character—especially that of Tom Bombadil—in which two different conclusions are reached. But characterization is also seen in the light of different literary techniques, motifs, and symbols. A unique contribution examines the place of linguistics in Tolkien’s literary art, employing Gricean concepts in an analysis of The Lay of the Children of Húrin. And a quite timely essay presents a new interpretation of Tolkien’s attitude toward the environment, especially in the character of Tom Bombadil. In sum, this volume covers new ground, and treads some well-worn paths; but here the well-worn path takes a new turn, taking not only scholars but general readers further into the complex and provocative world of Middle-earth, and beyond.