America's Uncivil Wars

The Sixties Era from Elvis to the Fall of Richard Nixon

Author: Mark H. Lytle

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 382

'America's Uncivil Wars' explores the social & cultural issues that preoccupied America in the years 1954-1974.

The War Between the States

America's Uncivil War

Author: John J. Dwyer

Publisher: Red River Press

ISBN:

Category: Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877)

Page: 682

View: 355

Finally, the true story of the War Between the States, in one captivating volume. With more than 530 illustrations, nearly 100 biographical sketches, and his attention-grabbing style, John J. Dwyer has radically transformed the tedious, uninspiring textbook rendering of the Civil War into what it should be America's greatest epic. Respected historians George Grant, J. Steven Wilkins, Douglas Wilson, and Tom Spencer are contributing editors to the The War Between the States: America's Uncivil War, and over two dozen of renowned historical artist John Paul Strain's greatest works appear. The book offers 700 action-packed pages of war-time drama that will forever change the way Americans view the Civil War.

Modern Wittenberg

Author: William A. Kinnison

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 400

View: 464

Whatever happened to America's small, private, residential, undergraduate, Liberal Arts Colleges? Will they survive the present contest with pragmatic publicly supported community colleges and the secular mega universities? The story of Wittenberg, one of the best of Ohio's many good Liberal Arts Colleges, provides answers to such questions. It looks at this critical period in their history giving hope that the very best of them will prosper. They are an endangered national resource that should be preserved and no more of them are being started. The book is written both for the casual reader and for historians and professional educators.

The Gentle Subversive

Rachel Carson, Silent Spring, and the Rise of the Environmental Movement

Author: Mark Hamilton Lytle

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 288

View: 758

Rachel Carson's Silent Spring antagonized some of the most powerful interests in the nation--including the farm block and the agricultural chemical industry--and helped launch the modern environmental movement. In The Gentle Subversive, Mark Hamilton Lytle offers a compact biography of Carson, illuminating the road that led to this vastly influential book. Lytle explores the evolution of Carson's ideas about nature, her love for the sea, her career as a biologist, and above all her emergence as a writer of extraordinary moral and ecological vision. We follow Carson from her childhood on a farm outside Pittsburgh, where she first developed her love of nature (and where, at age eleven, she published her first piece in a children's magazine), to her graduate work at Johns Hopkins and her career with the Fish and Wildlife Service. Lytle describes the genesis of her first book, Under the Sea-Wind, the incredible success of The Sea Around Us (a New York Times bestseller for over a year), and her determination to risk her fame in order to write her "poison book": Silent Spring. The author contends that despite Carson's demure, lady-like demeanor, she was subversive in her thinking and aggressive in her campaign against pesticides. Carson became the spokeswoman for a network of conservationists, scientists, women, and other concerned citizens who had come to fear the mounting dangers of the human assault on nature. What makes this story particularly compelling is that Carson took up this cause at the very moment when she herself faced a losing battle with cancer. Succinct and engaging, The Gentle Subversive is a story of success, celebrity, controversy, and vindication. It will inspire anyone interested in protecting the natural world or in women's struggle to find a voice in society.

Dressing for the Culture Wars

Style and the Politics of Self-Presentation in the 1960s And 1970s

Author: Betty Luther Hillman

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN:

Category: Design

Page: 280

View: 602

Style of dress has always been a way for Americans to signify their politics, but perhaps never so overtly as in the 1960s and 1970s. Whether participating in presidential campaigns or Vietnam protests, hair and dress provided a powerful cultural tool for social activists to display their politics to the world and became both the cause and a symbol of the rift in American culture. Some Americans saw stylistic freedom as part of their larger political protests, integral to the ideals of self-expression, sexual freedom, and equal rights for women and minorities. Others saw changes in style as the erosion of tradition and a threat to the established social and gender norms at the heart of family and nation. Through the lens of fashion and style, Dressing for the Culture Wars guides us through the competing political and social movements of the 1960s and 1970s. Although long hair on men, pants and miniskirts on women, and other hippie styles of self-fashioning could indeed be controversial, Betty Luther Hillman illustrates how self-presentation influenced the culture and politics of the era and carried connotations similarly linked to the broader political challenges of the time. Luther Hillman’s new line of inquiry demonstrates how fashion was both a reaction to and was influenced by the political climate and its implications for changing norms of gender, race, and sexuality.

Reinventing Richard Nixon

A Cultural History of an American Obsession

Author: Daniel E. Frick

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 331

View: 287

The author focuses on the process of Richard Nixon's continuous reinvention in an intriguing study that reveals a figure who continues to expose key fault lines in the nation's self-definition.

Uncivil Wars

Elena Garro, Octavio Paz, and the Battle for Cultural Memory

Author: Sandra Messinger Cypess

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 261

View: 944

The first English-language book to place the works of Elena Garro (1916–1998) and Octavio Paz (1914–1998) in dialogue with each other, Uncivil Wars evokes the lives of two celebrated literary figures who wrote about many of the same experiences and contributed to the formation of Mexican national identity but were judged quite differently, primarily because of gender. While Paz’s privileged, prize-winning legacy has endured worldwide, Garro’s literary gifts garnered no international prizes and received less attention in Latin American literary circles. Restoring a dual perspective on these two dynamic writers and their world, Uncivil Wars chronicles a collective memory of wars that shaped Mexico, and in turn shaped Garro and Paz, from the Conquest period to the Mexican Revolution; the Spanish Civil War, which the couple witnessed while traveling abroad; and the student massacre at Tlatelolco Plaza in 1968, which brought about social and political changes and further tensions in the battle of the sexes. The cultural contexts of machismo and ethnicity provide an equally rich ground for Sandra Cypess’s exploration of the tandem between the writers’ personal lives and their literary production. Uncivil Wars illuminates the complexities of Mexican society as seen through a tense marriage of two talented, often oppositional writers. The result is an alternative interpretation of the myths and realities that have shaped Mexican identity, and its literary soul, well into the twenty-first century.

Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy

Wounded Spirits and Healing Paths

Author: David A. Crenshaw

Publisher: Jason Aronson

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 174

View: 657

This edited collection by David A. Crenshaw, with contributions from such notables as James Garbarino, Kenneth V. Hardy, and Andrew Fussner, addresses the multiple sources of wounding of children and teens in contemporary life. The book conveys a message of hope and optimism, even in work with children who might be viewed as 'impossible cases,' because the contributors share a passion for utilizing and building on the strengths of children and families. These authors go beyond treating psychiatric symptoms to address in a more comprehensive way the emotional suffering of youth. The unifying treatment framework for the book is relational therapy. The emotional injuries of children do not develop in a vacuum, but rather in a relational context, and healing must also be embedded in an empathic relationship between the child and the family. Building, repairing, and restoring connections within the family and the larger community, as well as within the therapeutic relationship, opens the door to growth, healing, and meaningful belonging. The stories of triumph over adversity by the courageous children and families in this book will inspire those who daily strive to make a meaningful difference in the lives of hurting youth to renew their commitment to this worthy mission.