Errand to the World

American Protestant Thought and Foreign Missions

Author: William R. Hutchison

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 227

View: 526

Provides a history of American foreign-mission thought from the colonial period to the present day, exploring the ramifications of a culture's attempts to extend its ideals and technology to another people.

Errand Into the Wilderness

Author: Perry Miller

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 962

The title of this book by Perry Miller, who is world-famous as an interpreter of the American past, comes close to posing the question it has been Mr. Miller's lifelong purpose to answer: What was the underlying aim of the first colonists in coming to America? In what light did they see themselves? As men and women undertaking a mission that was its own cause and justification? Or did they consider themselves errand boys for a higher power which might, as is frequently the habit of authority, change its mind about the importance of their job before they had completed it? These questions are by no means frivolous. They go to the roots of seventeenth-century thought and of the ever-widening and quickening flow of events since then. Disguised from twentieth-century readers first by the New Testament language and thought of the Puritans and later by the complacent transcendentalist belief in the oversoul, the related problems of purpose and reason-for-being have been central to the American experience from the very beginning. Mr. Miller makes this abundantly clear and real, and in doing so allows the reader to conclude that, whatever else America might have become, it could never have developed into a society that took itself for granted. The title, Errand into the Wilderness, is taken from the title of a Massachusetts election sermon of 1670. Like so many jeremiads of its time, this sermon appeared to be addressed to the sinful and unregenerate whom God was about to destroy. But the original speaker's underlying concern was with the fateful ambiguity in the word errand. Whose errand? This crucial uncertainty of the age is the starting point of Mr. Miller's engrossing account of what happened to the European mind when, in spite of itself, it began to become something other than European. For the second generation in America discovered that their heroic parents had, in fact, been sent on a fool's errand, the bitterest kind of all; that the dream of a model society to be built in purity by the elect in the new continent was now a dream that meant nothing more to Europe. The emigrants were on their own. Thus left alone with America, who were they? And what were they to do? In this book, as in all his work, the author of The New England Mind: The Seventeenth Century; The New England Mind: From Colony to Province, and The Transcendentalists, emphasizes the need for understanding the human sources from which the American mainstream has risen. In this integrated series of brilliant and witty essays which he describes as pieces, Perry Miller invites and stimulates in the reader a new conception of his own inheritance.

Fool's Errand

Time to End the War in Afghanistan

Author: Scott Horton

Publisher: The Libertarian Institute

ISBN:

Category: Afghan War, 2001-

Page: 316

View: 198

"After more than a decade and a half, the results are in. The U.S. government has been unable to achieve its goals in Afghanistan. Even worse, what state it has been able to achieve there is completely unsustainable and certain to fall apart when the occupation is finally called off, and America does come home. The politicans, generals, and intelligence officers behind this unending catastrophe, who always promise they can fix these problems with just a little bit more time, money and military force, have lost all credibility. The truth is America's Afghan war is an irredeemable disaster. It was meant to be a trap in the first place. America is not only failing to defeat its enemies, but is destroying itself, just as Osama bin Laden and al Qaeda always intended. Fool's Errand is an attempt to present the American people with the reality of this forgotten war, because only the ignorance of pride and refusal to admit they have been deceived can prevent Americans from realizing they have supported a policy that is destructive to the United States as well as Afghanistan." -- from Introduction.

New Directions in American Religious History

Author: Harry S. Stout

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 512

View: 228

The eighteen essays collected in this book originate from a conference of the same title, held at the Wingspread Conference Center in October of 1993. Leading scholars were invited to reflect on their specialties in American religious history in ways that summarized both where the field is and where it ought to move in the decades to come. The essays are organized according to four general themes: places and regions, universal themes, transformative events, and marginal groups and ethnocultural "outsiders." They address a wide range of specific topics including Puritanism, Protestantism and economic behavior, gender and sexuality in American Protestantism, and the twentieth-century de-Christianization of American public culture. Among the contributors are such distinguished scholars as David D. Hall, Donald G. Matthews, Allen C. Guelzo, Gordon S. Wood, Daniel Walker Howe, Robert Wuthnow, Jon Butler, David A. Hollinger, Harry S. Stout, and John Higham. Taken together, these essays reveal a rapidly expanding field of study that is breaking out of its traditional confines and spilling into all of American history. The book takes the measure of the changes of the last quarter-century and charts numerous challenges to future work.

American Exceptionalism in the Age of Globalization

The Specter of Vietnam

Author: William V. Spanos

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 321

View: 985

Connects the American exceptionalist ethos to the violence in Vietnam and the Middle East.

The Puritan Origins of American Patriotism

Author: George McKenna

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 431

View: 794

How the Puritans' belief in a providential mission led to a uniquely American form of patriotism In this absorbing book, George McKenna ranges across the entire panorama of American history to track the development of American patriotism. That patriotism--shaped by Reformation Protestantism and imbued with the American Puritan belief in a providential "errand"--has evolved over 350 years and influenced American political culture in both positive and negative ways, McKenna shows. The germ of the patriotism, an activist theology that stressed collective rather than individual salvation, began in the late 1630s in New England and traveled across the continent, eventually becoming a national phenomenon. Today, American patriotism still reflects its origins in the seventeenth century. By encouraging cohesion in a nation of diverse peoples and inspiring social reform, American patriotism has sometimes been a force for good. But the book also uncovers a darker side of the nation's patriotism--a prejudice against the South in the nineteenth century, for example, and a tendency toward nativism and anti-Catholicism. Ironically, a great reversal has occurred, and today the most fervent believers in the Puritan narrative are the former "outsiders"--Catholics and Southerners. McKenna offers an interesting new perspective on patriotism's role throughout American history, and he concludes with trenchant thoughts on its role in the post-9/11 era.

American Exceptionalisms

From Winthrop to Winfrey

Author: Sylvia Söderlind

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 278

View: 292

Wide ranging, interdisciplinary look at the emergence and persistence of the concept of American Exceptionalism in US culture and history.

American Dream 2.0

A Christian Way Out of the Great Recession

Author: Frank A. Thomas

Publisher: Abingdon Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 214

View: 265

We need a new version of the American Dream.

Heaven Upon Earth

Joseph Mede (1586-1638) and the Legacy of Millenarianism

Author: Jeffrey K. Jue

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 281

View: 788

This book contributes to the ongoing revision of early modern British history by examining the apocalyptic tradition through the life and writings of Joseph Mede (1586-1638). The history of the British apocalyptic tradition has yet to undergo a thorough revision. Past studies followed a historiographical paradigm which associated millenarianism with a revolutionary agenda. A careful study of Joseph Mede, one of the key individuals responsible for the rebirth of millenarianism in England, suggests a different picture of seventeenth-century apocalypticism. The roots of Mede's apocalyptic thought are not found in extreme activism, but in the detailed study of the Apocalypse with the aid of ancient Christian and Jewish sources. Mede’s legacy illustrates the geographical prevalence and long-term sustainability of his interpretations. This volume shows that the continual discussion of millenarian ideas reveals a vibrant tradition that cannot be reconstructed to fit within one simple historiographical narrative.

To Live Ancient Lives

The Primitivist Dimension in Puritanism

Author: Theodore Dwight Bozeman

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 413

View: 299

To Live Ancient Lives signals a sharp redirection of Puritan studies. It provides the first comprehensive study of Puritan primitivism, defined as the drive to recover and return to church and society the ordinances of biblical times. This work tra

Schooling, the Puritan Imperative, and the Molding of an American National Identity

Education's "Errand Into the Wilderness"

Author: Douglas McKnight

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 184

View: 308

Present-day America is perceived by many as immersed in a moral crisis, with national identity fractured and uncertainty and anxiety about the future. Public schools in this country are, historically and still today, the major institution charged with preserving and teaching the symbols of national identity and a morality that is the concrete expression of those symbols and the ideas for which they stand. A widespread belief is that only through schooling can America be saved from the current "crisis," but the schools have failed in this mission and must be reformed. In this book, Douglas McKnight develops a historical interpretation of how the New England Puritans generated a powerful belief system and set of symbols that have fed American identity and contributed to preserving and perpetuating it into the present time. He explores the relationship between the purposes of education (and how this term has shifted in meaning) and the notion of an American identity and morality--rooted in the Puritan concept of an "errand into the wilderness"--that serves a particular sacred/secular purpose. The phrase "errand into the wilderness" is taken from a 1956 book by Perry Miller with this title, where it refers to the Puritan dream of creating a city in the wilderness (the North American Colonies) that would be a utopian community--a beacon for the rest of the world for how to organize and live in the ideal religious community. Highly pertinent to the current debate about the purposes and crisis in education and in America, morality in schools, the cultural function of education, the changing nature of the language of education, the complex relation of schooling and national identity, this book explicates these elements within the American psyche by exploring the effects of the Puritan "symbolic narrative" at three different points in American history: Puritans during the 1600s and 1700s; the Gilded Age, when the urban Protestant middle class ascended to cultural dominance; and the present age. Schooling, the Puritan Imperative, and the Molding of an American National Identity: Education's "Errand Into the Wilderness" makes an important contribution to the fields of curriculum studies and the history of education. It will interest students and scholars in these fields, as well as those in educational philosophy, religion and education, intellectual and social history, and American studies.

Start Your Own Senior Services Business

Adult Day-Care, Relocation Service, Home-Care, Transportation Service, Concierge, Travel Service

Author: Entrepreneur Press

Publisher: Entrepreneur Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 242

View: 888

The senior population is multiplying by the millions! In fact, during the next 25 years, the senior population in America is expected to double — growing faster than the total population in every state. This means one thing: a tremendous opportunity for aspiring and compassionate entrepreneurs. From providing adult daycare or homecare to transportation or concierge needs, this guide covers today’s most requested services within the 65-and-older market. Readers learn, step by step, how to choose the right opportunity for them, legally and financially establish their business, acquire licenses and certifications, set policies and procedures, and much more! Priceless insight, advice, and tips from practicing senior care professionals help aspiring entrepreneurs to discover their specialty from within one of six growing areas of interest — adult daycare, relocation services, homecare, transportation services, concierge, and travel service; design a business to suit customers’ demographics and special needs; set rates; create a support staff who will facilitate success; use effective marketing and advertising to get the word out; build valuable business partnerships that lead to referrals; and plan for future growth. A record number of seniors are seeking help, and this guide is the key to starting a senior care service today!

Vietnam in American Literature

Author: Philip H. Melling

Publisher: Twayne Pub

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 230

View: 858

Examines American writings on the Vietnam War from 1971 to the present and relates these works to the Puritan heritage

An Absorbing Errand

How Artists and Craftsmen Make Their Way to Mastery

Author: Janna Malamud Smith

Publisher: Catapult

ISBN:

Category: Self-Help

Page: 272

View: 206

“A comprehensive, insightful, and articulate guide for everyone who has ever attempted to make art.” —San Francisco Chronicle An Absorbing Errand uses stories of artist’s lives, personal anecdotes, and insights from the author’s work as a psychotherapist to examine the psychological obstacles that prevent people from staying with, and relishing, the process of art-making. Each chapter is devoted to a problem intrinsic to the creative process and illustrates how these very obstacles, once understood, can become prime sources of the energy that actually fuels the mastery of art-making. Ultimately, An Absorbing Errand provides a philosophical, historical, and analytical look at the creative impulse and how certain artists from a wide field mastered their craft. From Julia Child to Charlie Chaplin to Lady Gaga, famous painters to established writers, Smith shows us how each overcame the obstacles they faced in the pursuit of their creative visions.

Thornton Wilder and the Puritan Narrative Tradition

Author: Lincoln Konkle

Publisher: University of Missouri Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 301

View: 590

"Fresh examination of the works of Thornton Wilder emphasizing continuities in American literature from the seventeenth through twentieth centuries. Sees Wilder as a literary descendant of Edward Taylor who drew from the Puritan worldview and tradition. Includes indepth readings of Shadow of a Doubt, The Trumpet Shall Sound, and others"--Provided by publisher.

An Errand of Mercy

The Evangelical United Front, 1790-1837

Author: Charles I. Foster

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Evangelicalism

Page: 320

View: 874

A Brief History of the Presbyterians

Author: James Hutchinson Smylie

Publisher: Geneva Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 160

View: 351

Traces the development of the Presbyterian Church from its beginnings in the sixteenth century to its position in the modern world