American Colonies

The Settling of North America (The Penguin History of the United States, Volume 1)

Author: Alan Taylor

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 544

View: 619

A multicultural, multinational history of colonial America from the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Internal Enemy and American Revolutions In the first volume in the Penguin History of the United States, edited by Eric Foner, Alan Taylor challenges the traditional story of colonial history by examining the many cultures that helped make America, from the native inhabitants from milennia past, through the decades of Western colonization and conquest, and across the entire continent, all the way to the Pacific coast. Transcending the usual Anglocentric version of our colonial past, he recovers the importance of Native American tribes, African slaves, and the rival empires of France, Spain, the Netherlands, and even Russia in the colonization of North America. Moving beyond the Atlantic seaboard to examine the entire continent, American Colonies reveals a pivotal period in the global interaction of peoples, cultures, plants, animals, and microbes. In a vivid narrative, Taylor draws upon cutting-edge scholarship to create a timely picture of the colonial world characterized by an interplay of freedom and slavery, opportunity and loss. "Formidable . . . provokes us to contemplate the ways in which residents of North America have dealt with diversity." -The New York Times Book Review From the Trade Paperback edition.

Forces of Nature

Our Quest to Conquer the Planet

Author: Barry A. Vann

Publisher: Prometheus Books

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 342

View: 863

As long as the human species has existed, men and women have had to contend with the unpredictable forces of nature. Geographer Barry A. Vann brings a unique perspective to this age-old struggle in this illuminating overview of human population shifts and their precarious relationship with climate change and geography. Vann takes us on a journey along the migration routes of the earliest modern humans and tells why our ancestors chose to settle down in places that can be best described as natural utopias. In the religiously oriented worldview of ancient peoples, such places took on a sacred aura of divine favor. Similarly, destructive events such as volcanic eruptions and earthquakes were interpreted as expressions of divine wrath. Vann shows how the ancient texts of the Bible and the Qur’an offer glimpses of past climates that were distinctly different from the climate of our time. He also discusses the rise of technology as a means of controlling the threatening features of the natural world. Though technology has enabled humanity to cope with hostile climates, it has also created a false sense of security. Vann notes that population clusters are increasing in dangerous areas and that no technology can protect vulnerable groups from major-category hurricanes, tornadoes, or earthquakes. Finally, he considers our current anxieties regarding global warming, pointing out that this focus has obscured a good deal of historical and geological evidence for a return of another ice age. The Forces of Nature offers a challenging perspective on the precarious balance between fragile human communities and their often-threatening environments.

The Divided Ground

Indians, Settlers, and the Northern Borderland of the American Revolution

Author: Alan Taylor

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 560

View: 571

From the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of William Cooper's Town comes a dramatic and illuminating portrait of white and Native American relations in the aftermath of the American Revolution. The Divided Ground tells the story of two friends, a Mohawk Indian and the son of a colonial clergyman, whose relationship helped redefine North America. As one served American expansion by promoting Indian dispossession and religious conversion, and the other struggled to defend and strengthen Indian territories, the two friends became bitter enemies. Their battle over control of the Indian borderland, that divided ground between the British Empire and the nascent United States, would come to define nationhood in North America. Taylor tells a fascinating story of the far-reaching effects of the American Revolution and the struggle of American Indians to preserve a land of their own. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Colonial America

A Very Short Introduction

Author: Alan Taylor

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 151

View: 895

In this Very Short Introduction, Alan Taylor presents the current scholarly understanding of colonial America to a broader audience. He focuses on the transatlantic and a transcontinental perspective, examining the interplay of Europe, Africa, and the Americas through the flows of goods, people, plants, animals, capital, and ideas.

Creating the American West

Boundaries and Borderlands

Author: Derek R. Everett

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 320

View: 454

Boundaries—lines imposed on the landscape—shape our lives, dictating everything from which candidates we vote for to what schools our children attend to the communities with which we identify. In Creating the American West, historian Derek R. Everett examines the function of these internal lines in American history generally and in the West in particular. Drawing lines to create states in the trans-Mississippi West, he points out, imposed a specific form of political organization that made the West truly American. Everett examines how settlers lobbied for boundaries and how politicians imposed them. He examines the origins of boundary-making in the United States from the colonial era through the Louisiana Purchase. Case studies then explore the ethnic, sectional, political, and economic angles of boundaries. Everett first examines the boundaries between Arkansas and its neighboring Native cultures, and the pseudo war between Missouri and Iowa. He then traces the lines splitting the Oregon Country and the states of California and Nevada, and considers the ethnic and political consequences of the boundary between New Mexico and Colorado. He explains the evolution of the line splitting the Dakotas, and concludes with a discussion of ways in which state boundaries can contribute toward new interpretations of borderlands history. A major theme in the history of state boundaries is the question of whether to use geometric or geographic lines—in other words, lines corresponding to parallels and meridians or those fashioned by natural features. With the distribution of western land, Everett shows, geography gave way to geometry and transformed the West. The end of boundary-making in the late nineteenth century is not the end of the story, however. These lines continue to complicate a host of issues including water rights, taxes, political representation, and immigration. Creating the American West shows how the past continues to shape the present.

The Enduring Vision: A History of the American People, Volume 1: To 1877, Concise

Author: Paul Boyer

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 335

Like its corresponding full-size version, THE ENDURING VISION, CONCISE, is an engaging, elegantly written narrative that emphasizes political, social, and cultural history within a chronological framework. THE ENDURING VISION is known for sustained attention to cultural history, and for innovative coverage of the environment, and the West. The Sixth Edition of THE ENDURING VISION, CONCISE, features a new co-author, Andrew Rieser, new pedagogy, and a beautiful new design. Available in the following split options: THE ENDURING VISION, CONCISE Sixth Edition Complete (Chapters 1-32), ISBN: 0547222807; Volume A: To 1877 (Chapters 1-16), ISBN: 0547222815; Volume B: Since 1865 (Chapters 16-32), ISBN: 0547222785. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Between Two Worlds

How the English Became Americans

Author: Malcolm Gaskill

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 309

Between Two Worlds is a story teeming with people on the move, making decisions, indulging or resisting their desires and dreams. In the seventeenth century a quarter of a million men, women, and children left England's shores for America. Some were explorers and merchants, others soldiers and missionaries; many were fugitives from poverty and persecution. All, in their own way, were adventurers, risking their lives and fortunes to make something of themselves overseas. They irrevocably changed the land and indigenous peoples they encountered - and their new world changed them. But that was only half the story. The plantations established from Maine to the Caribbean needed support at home, especially royal endorsement and money, which made adventurers of English monarchs and investors too. Attitudes to America were crucial, and evolved as the colonies grew in size, prosperity, and self-confidence. Meanwhile, for those who had crossed the ocean, America forced people to rethink the country in which they had been raised, and to which they remained attached after emigration. In tandem with new ideas about the New World, migrants pondered their English mother country's traditions and achievements, its problems and its uncertain future in an age of war and revolution. Using hundreds of letters, journals, reports, pamphlets and contemporary books, Between Two Worlds recreates this fascinating transatlantic history - one which has often been neglected or misunderstood on both sides of the Atlantic in the centuries since.

Cengage Advantage Books: Making America, Volume 1: To 1877

Author: Carol Berkin

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 544

View: 504

Developed to meet the demand for a low-cost, high-quality history book, this economically priced version of MAKING AMERICA, Sixth Edition offers readers the complete narrative while limiting the number of features, photos, and maps. All volumes feature a paperback, two-color format that appeals to those seeking a comprehensive, trade-sized history text. Shaped with a clear political chronology, MAKING AMERICA reflects the variety of individual experiences and cultures that comprise American society. MAKING AMERICA provides a clear, helpful text that meets students where they are. For instructors whose classrooms mirror the diversity of today's college students, the strongly chronological narrative, together with an integrated program of learning and teaching aids, makes the historical content vivid and comprehensible to students at all levels of preparedness. Available in the following options: CENGAGE ADVANTAGE BOOKS: MAKING AMERICA, Sixth Edition (Chapters 1-29); Volume 1: To 1877 (Chapters 1-15); Volume 2: Since 1865 (Chapters 15-29). Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Colonial Families of the United States of America

In which is Given the History, Genealogy and Armorial Bearings of Colonial Families who Settled in the American Colonies from the Time of the Settlement of Jamestown, 13th May, 1607, to the Battle of Lexington, 19th April, 1775

Author: George Norbury Mackenzie

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 719

Lectures on Colonization and Colonies: Volume 1

Delivered Before the University of Oxford in 1839, 1840, and 1841

Author: Herman Merivale

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 144

An influential series of lectures discussing the economic effects of contemporary colonization, first published in 1841.