Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Author: Mark Twain

Publisher: Prestwick House Inc

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 280

View: 209

This Prestwick House Literary Touchstone Edition includes a glossary and reader's notes to help the modern reader contend with Twain's language, allusions, and deliberate misstatements and malapropisms.The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain's sequel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, became an instant success in the year of its publication, 1884, but was seen by some as unfit for children to read because of its language, grammar, and "uncivilized hero." The book has sparked controversy ever since, but most scholars continue to praise it as a modern masterpiece, an essential read, and one of the greatest novels in all of American literature.Twain's satiric treatment of racism, religious excess, and rural simplicity and his accuracy in presenting dialects mark Huck Finn as a classic. His unswerving confidence in Huck's wisdom and maturity, along with the well-rounded and sympathetic portrayal of Jim draw readers into the book, holding them until Huck's last words rejecting all attempts to "sivilize" him.

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and Zombie Jim

Author: Mark Twain

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 288

View: 124

THERE WARN’T NO HOME LIKE A RAFT, AFTER ALL. THE MONSTERS CAIN’T GET YOU THERE. NOT SO EASY. Free at last! Huckleberry Finn and Bagger Jim, his dearest, deadest friend, have set sail on a great adventure once again, but this time rattlers, scammers, and robbers are the least of their worries. The pox is killing men and bringing them back meaner and hungrier than ever, and zombies all over are giving in to their urges to eat. Huck can’t be sure that friendship will keep him from getting eaten up too, but with a price on Jim’s head for the murder Huck staged of himself, they’ve got to rely on each other and the mighty Mississippi to make their great escape. . . .

Understanding Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

A Student Casebook to Issues, Sources, and Historical Documents

Author: Claudia Durst Johnson

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 246

View: 466

Interdisciplinary primary materials for classroom use and student research illuminate the historical and social issues of this controversial American classic.

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Author: Mark Twain

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 224

View: 516

Join Huck and Jim as their boyhood adventures along the Mississippi River lead them into a world of excitement, danger, and self-discovery. Humorous narrative, lyrical descriptions of the Mississippi valley, and memorable characters.

The annotated Huckleberry Finn

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Author: Mark Twain

Publisher: Random House Value Pub

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 378

View: 698

Mark Twain's classic novel about the experiences of a boy who runs away from home with a fugitive slave is supplemented by extensive literary and historical commentary

Huckleberry Finn

Author: Pauline Francis

Publisher: Evans Brothers

ISBN:

Category: Finn, Huckleberry (Fictitious character)

Page: 48

View: 944

This wonderful series is a quick way into a range of exciting stories, from the chilling tale of Frankenstein, to the gripping adventure of Treasure Island and the powerful animal story of Cali of the Wild. Fast-moving and accessible, each story is a shortened, dramatically illustrated version of the classic novel, which loses none of the strength and flavour of the original. Huckleberry Finn is the story of a young boy, Huckleberry Finn, and his companion, Jim - an escaped slave on the run. It chronicles the journey they take down the Mississippi River on a plight for freedom.

Social Criticism in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn

Author: Barbara Groß-Langenhoff

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 19

View: 950

Seminar paper from the year 2003 in the subject American Studies - Literature, grade: 1,0, University of Cologne, course: 19th Century Children's Literature, 15 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: Mark Twain’s novelThe Adventures of Tom Sawyer,first published in 1876, and its sequelThe Adventures of Huckleberry Finnof 1885 are widely known and praised as boyhood adventure stories. Both young and old are fascinated by the nostalgic portraits of American childhood, which are also blended with a good portion of social criticism. This essay will concentrate on the novels’ depiction of South American society and on critical observations and comments made by the author. His attitude towards societal concepts of education, religion and slavery will be examined, as will the conflict between individual and social morality, which is highlighted in the two novels. The subsequent evaluation will consider the question whether Twain’s criticism of his generation continues to be relevant today. Before I can embark, though, on the study of social criticism inThe Adventures of Tom SawyerandHuckleberry Finn,it is useful to have some background information about the period of writing and the author’s notion of childhood, which will make it easier to analyse the novels in the context of 19thcentury American children’s literature. Therefore, I am going to begin with a brief outline of the entirely opposing trends in juvenile fiction in the first and the second half of the 19thcentury.

The Originals: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Author: Mark Twain

Publisher: Om Books International

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 256

View: 502

In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, a sequel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Huck escapes from the clutches of his abusive drunk father ‘Pap’, and the ‘sivilizing’ guardian Widow Douglas. After faking his own death in pursuit of freedom, during one of his travels, Huck, encounters Jim, a runaway slave. Together, they embark on an exciting journey along the Mississippi River, meeting different people and participating in their unusual lives. With time, Huck finds himself in a moral dilemma over societal values and his own friendship with Jim. First published in 1884, the book was an indictment of racism, class prejudices and identity conflicts. Regarded as one of the Great American Novels, this timeless classic by Mark Twain is also among the first in American literature to be written in regional English, relying on scathing satire, folksy humour, colloquial speech and coarse language.