Academic Freedom in the Age of the College

Author: Richard Hofstadter

Publisher: Transaction Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 284

View: 595

When this classic volume first appeared, academic freedom was a crucially important issue. It is equally so today. Hofstadter approaches the topic historically, showing how events from various historical epochs expose the degree of freedom in academic institutions. The volume exemplifies Richard Hofstader's qualities as a historian as well as his characteristic narrative ability. Hofstadter first describes the medieval university and how its political independence evolved from its status as a corporate body, establishing a precedent for intellectual freedom that has been a measuring rod ever since. He shows how all intellectual discourse became polarized with the onset of the Reformation. The gradual spread of the Moderate Enlightenment in the colonies led to a major advance for intellectual freedom. But with the beginning of the nineteenth century the rise of denominationalism in both new and established colleges reversed the progress, and the secularization of learning became engulfed by a tidal wave of intensifying piety. Roger L. Geiger's extensive new introduction evaluates Hofstadter's career as a historian and political theorist, his interest in academic freedom, and the continuing significance of Academic Freedom in the Age of the College. While most works about higher education treat the subject only as an agent of social economic mobility, Academic Freedom in the Age of the College is an enduring counterweight to such histories as it examines a more pressing issue: the fact that colleges and universities, at their best, should foster ideas at the frontiers of knowledge and understanding. This classic text will be invaluable to educators, university administrators, sociologist, and historians.

Academic Freedom in an Age of Conformity

Confronting the Fear of Knowledge

Author: Joanna Williams

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 217

View: 706

Universities, once at the forefront of campaigns for intellectual liberty, are now bastions of conformity. This provocative book traces the demise of academic freedom within the context of changing ideas about the purpose of the university and the nature of knowledge and is a passionate call to arms for the power of academic thought today.

The Lost Soul of Higher Education

Corporatization, the Assault on Academic Freedom, and the End of the American University

Author: Ellen Schrecker

Publisher: The New Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 304

View: 172

Schrecker, the leading historian of the McCarthy-era witch hunts, examines both the key fronts in the present battles over higher ed, and their historical parallels in previous eras – offering a deeply-researched chronicle of the challenges to academic freedom, set against the rapidly changing structure of the academy itself. The Lost Soul of Higher Education tells the interwoven stories of successive, well-funded ideological assaults on academic freedom by outside pressure groups aimed at undermining the legitimacy of scholarly study, viewed alongside decades of eroding higher education budgets -- a trend that has sharply accelerated during the recent economic downturn.

The Historiography of Economics

British and American Economic Essays

Author: A.W. Bob Coats

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 528

View: 826

This is the third and final volume of collected papers of A.W. Bob Coats. Coats began to collect material for this volume in the years following the publication of the second volume in 1993, but sadly died in 2007, before the work was completed. The volume has now been completed under the editorship of Roger Backhouse and Bruce Caldwell. Along with his articles, the compilation of the volume also reflects Coats’ interest in and commitment to book reviews, a selection of which have been chosen for inclusion. The book also includes a comprehensive bibliography. In addition to a preface by Backhouse and Caldwell, the volume also reproduces the obituary that was published in History of Political Economy, a memoir published in 1996, and an interview with Grant Fleming, published the previous year. Together, the introductory materials, articles and reviews serve as a fitting tribute to the body of work of Bob Coats.

Academic Freedom and the Law

A Comparative Study

Author: Eric Barendt

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 360

View: 802

Academic Freedom and the Law: A Comparative Study provides a critical analysis of the law relating to academic freedom in three major jurisdictions: the United Kingdom, Germany and the United States. The book outlines the various claims which may be made to academic freedom by individual university teachers and by universities and other higher education institutions, and it examines the justifications which have been put forward for these claims. Three separate chapters deal with the legal principles of academic freedom in the UK, Germany, and the USA. A further chapter is devoted to the restrictions on freedom of research which may be imposed by the regulation of clinical trials, by intellectual property laws, and by the terms of contracts made between researchers and the companies sponsoring medical and other research. The book also examines the impact of recent terrorism laws on the teaching and research freedom of academics, and it discusses their freedom to speak about general political and social topics unrelated to their work. This is the first comparative study of a subject of fundamental importance to all academics and others working in universities. It emphasises the importance of academic freedom, while pointing out that, on occasion, exaggerated claims have been made to its exercise.

Academic Capitalism in the Age of Globalization

Author: Brendan Cantwell

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 296

View: 840

Today, nearly every aspect of higher education—including student recruitment, classroom instruction, faculty research, administrative governance, and the control of intellectual property—is embedded in a political economy with links to the market and the state. Academic capitalism offers a powerful framework for understanding this relationship. Essentially, it allows us to understand higher education’s shift from creating scholarship and learning as a public good to generating knowledge as a commodity to be monetized in market activities. In Academic Capitalism in the Age of Globalization, Brendan Cantwell and Ilkka Kauppinen assemble an international team of leading scholars to explore the profound ways in which globalization and the knowledge economy have transformed higher education around the world. The book offers an in-depth assessment of the theoretical foundations of academic capitalism, as well as new empirical insights into how the process of academic capitalism has played out. Chapters address academic capitalism from historical, transnational, national, and local perspectives. Each contributor offers fascinating insights into both new conceptual interpretations of and practical institutional and national responses to academic capitalism. Incorporating years of research by influential theorists and building on the work of Sheila Slaughter, Larry Leslie, and Gary Rhoades, Academic Capitalism in the Age of Globalization provides a provocative update for understanding academic capitalism. The book will appeal to anyone trying to make sense of contemporary higher education.

A Very Different Age

Americans of the Progressive Era

Author: Steven J. Diner

Publisher: Hill and Wang

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 768

The early twentieth century was a time of technological revolution in the United States. New inventions and corporations were transforming the economic landscape, bringing a stunning array of consumer goods, millions of additional jobs, and ever more wealth. Steven J. Diner draws on the rich scholarship of recent social history to show how these changes affected Americans of all backgrounds and walks of life, and in doing so offers a striking new interpretation of a crucial epoch in our history.

The University in the Age of Globalization

Rankings, Resources and Reforms

Author: W. Bienkowski

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 258

View: 549

An informed discussion of the global education market, analysing the rankings system, and the determinants which help universities to advance. The authors examine possible improvements in the promotion and commercialization of university research, and the role of universities in the social and economic development of transition economies.

Broken Knowledge

The Sway of the Scientific and Scholarly Ideal at Union Theological Seminary in New York, 1887-1926

Author: Younglae Kim

Publisher: University Press of America

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 222

View: 966

Broken Knowledge explores the impacts of the scientific and scholarly ideal of the modern university on theological education at Union Theological Seminary from 1887-1926. During this period, the marks of the modern university --specialization, the elective system, professionalization, and the empirical research orientation-- were incorporated into theological education. While vigorously implanting the new university's structural and functional patterns into theological education, the seminary and its theologians strove to bring theological discussions into the arena of secularized academia, to achieve independence from church dogmatism, to expand the scope of theological outlook in social domains, and to bind science and religion together. Without doubt, these efforts deserve due recognition. However, it is also undeniable that the current problems in theological education --the fragmentation of the theological curriculum and the loss of a holistic search for religious truth -- have to do with the seminary's adaptation to the new university ideal such as uncritical specialization and narrow modern epistemology at the turn of the century. This book explores how the decline of theology or the sacred in our modern world is connected with the dominance of modern scientific ways of knowing in our search for truth and the lack of holistic approaches to the issue of faith and knowledge. This book searches for the recovery of wholeness in theological education and higher learning in general.

Shakespeare's America, America's Shakespeare (Routledge Revivals)

Author: Michael D. Bristol

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 238

View: 99

First published in 1990, this title explores the nature of the interaction between Shakespeare and American culture. Shakespeare stands at the center of an elaborate institutional reality, closely tied to both cultural and ideological production. His plays, Michael Bristol asserts, help to constitute a primary affirmative theme of much American culture criticism, specifically the celebration of individuality and the values of expressive autonomy. This reissue will be of particular value to Literature students and researchers with an interest in Shakespeare, as well as those interested in American cultural history more generally.