Aboriginal Place Names

Author: Alexander Wyclif Reed

Publisher: New Holland Pub Pty Limited

ISBN:

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 135

View: 143

"Where does the name Cooloongatta come from? What does Uluru mean? So many of our place names are derived from Aboriginal words, but their orgins and meaning are unknown to most Australians. This new edition gives thousands of Aboriginal meanings from all over Australia, plus many new entries for places that have recently been given Aboriginal names."--BOOK COVER.

Aboriginal Placenames

Naming and Re-naming the Australian Landscape

Author: Luise Hercus

Publisher: ANU E Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 496

View: 994

Aboriginal approaches to the naming of places across Australia differ radically from the official introduced Anglo-Australian system. However, many of these earlier names have been incorporated into contemporary nomenclature, with considerable reinterpretations of their function and form. Recently, state jurisdictions have encouraged the adoption of a greater number of Indigenous names, sometimes alongside the accepted Anglo-Australian terms, around Sydney Harbour, for example. In some cases, the use of an introduced name, such as Gove, has been contested by local Indigenous people. The 19 studies brought together in this book present an overview of current issues involving Indigenous placenames across the whole of Australia, drawing on the disciplines of geography, linguistics, history, and anthropology. They include meticulous studies of historical records, and perspectives stemming from contemporary Indigenous communities. The book includes a wealth of documentary information on some 400 specific placenames, including those of Sydney Harbour, the Blue Mountains, Canberra, western Victoria, the Lake Eyre district, the Victoria River District, and southwestern Cape York Peninsula.

British Columbia Place Names

Third Edition

Author: G.P. (Philip) V. Akrigg

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 330

View: 416

Elephant Crossing. Houdini Needles. Miniskirt, Tickletoeteaser Tower, and Why Not Mountain. These are just some of the many names of places, rivers, mountains, and lakes that you will come across in the newest edition of British Columbia Place Names. This classic which, in its various editions, has sold over 29,000 copies, covers about 2,500 geographical features, cities, towns, and smaller communities in the province. The book abounds with fascinating historical facts, stories, and remarkable characters involved with the names of towns, cities, rivers, lakes, mountains, and islands. The selection was determined by the geographical importance of the feature as well as story of the naming. In the introduction the authors deal with the stages by which B.C. acquired its place names, the history of research into those names, and the categories into which they fall. The latter range from the honorific and commemorative to the comic and disrespectful. Aboriginal names receive particular attention. The location of each place is clearly indicated and the text is accompanied by detailed maps. Brief biographical accounts of persons with places named after them as well as an abundance of anecdotes make this a fascinating book for browsers and an invaluable resource for historians.

Indian Names on Wisconsin's Map

Author: Virgil J. Vogel

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 323

View: 343

"Of all the states of the American union, none has a name that has been spelled in more ways, or interpreted more variously, than Wisconsin. Among the spellings listed are Mesconsin, Meskousing, Mishkonsing, Ouisconsens, Ouisconsin, Ouisconsing, Ouiscousing, Ouiskonsin, Owisconsing, Quisconsing, Weeskonsan, Wisconsan, Wisconsin, Wishkonsing, and Wiskonsin. The name has been attributed to the French, Menominee, Ojibwa, Potawatami, Sauk-Fox, and Winnebago languages." Place names are cultural artifacts that tell us as much about how people lived as do relics dug from the ground, writes Virgil Vogel, one of America's foremost authorities on place names. They are historical records from which the location and migration of people, plants, and animals can be charted. Onalaska and Aztalan, not surprisingly, are place names transplanted to Wisconsin from the far north and south. Some names tell of topographic features that have long since disappeared or are little noticed today. Beaver Dam once had an Indian name meaning just that; Sheboygan, "big pipe" in Ojibwa, described the shape of a river bend. Other names are vestiges of ancient languages nowhere else recorded. Some commemorate historic events: Winneconne is believed by many to mean "place of the skulls." The Indian names of Wisconsin's towns, rivers, and lakes reveal the minds of the Indian peoples, their cosmic views, their values, their relation to their environment , and their ways of life and convey as well something of the history of their white invaders. Virgil Vogel's thirty years of research into Native American influence on geographical names has resulted in an absorbing account that illuminates the history and culture of Wisconsin Indians. Vogel tells his story thematically—names from the spirit world, names of trails and portages, French-Indian personal names, tribal names, and so on—to show that place names are part of a larger cultural and natural world. In recovering the history and meaning of these names, he has restored an important and colorful part of America's heritage.

Indian Names in Michigan

Author: Virgil J. Vogel

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 227

View: 114

Vogel traces the origin of hundreds of Indian place names

Aboriginal Place Names

Author: Queensland. Colonial Secretary's Office

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 751

Submitted by the late Colonial Secretary of Queensland (H.S. Dutton) & officers of that Department; Bourke District (approximately 50 words); Normanton (29); Wahlongman tribe (24); Cumberland District (18); Gilbert River (approximately 200); Percyville - Purkaburra tribe (approximately 100)

Aboriginal Place Names of New York (Classic Reprint)

Author: William M. Beauchamp

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 730

View: 326

Excerpt from Aboriginal Place Names of New York As we are not dealing with languages so much as a class Of names, this may suffice for Algonquin names, though very briefly stated. In considering Iroquois words Of the same class, a few words mav be quoted from Sir William Johnson, written in 1771. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

Victorian Aboriginal Place Names, Etc

Author: W. L. Murdoch

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 249

Names of places in Upper Murray District; list of 63 words Wangaratta; Photo of Elingeit, King of the Barweegee tribe, north Eastern, Victoria.