A Woman Without a Country

Author: Eavan Boland

Publisher: Carcanet

ISBN:

Category: Poetry

Page: 72

View: 939

The poems in Eavan Boland's new collection consider questions of inheritance and identity, of what is handed down and what is lost. Boland's poems are acts of preservation: they are aware of the significance of objects, memories, words, in keeping alive what we would otherwise lose / without thinking'. At the same time, they are a holding to account, addressing the damage wrought by that other inheritance, the art of empire', the business ... of colony'. In the title sequence, Boland seeks to restore voice and place to those who, like her grandmother, lived and died outside history', skilled in ... silence'.

Woman Without a Country

Finding Sacred Space

Author: Mira N. Lazarevic Ph.D.

Publisher: AuthorHouse

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 360

View: 507

The reader takes a death-defying journey with a woman whose life is torn apart by two wars, assassinations, and loss of home, family, country, and identity. She is welcomed to safety in another land, but at a high priceyears of torturous sexual abuse and suicidal depression, and loss of faith in God and in her adopted home. Just as she gives up, a miraculous cure intervenesshe recovers her identity, the truth of her origins. Transformed, she lives as an enlightened being, but without a home. This unprecedented pilgrimagea search for healing and identityrecounted in this book can be considered a search for truth. Why? Because knowing ones True Self is the ultimate healer. The Buddha stated this principle as dhamma, a law of nature. Living in truth is living with full awareness of the miracle of lifeall life. This is it. Miras journey out of the madness of destruction and serious mental illness demonstrates how creativity, Yoga, meditation devoted to self-inquiry lead to self-knowledge, strengthen intuition, bring one to eternal essence or universal intelligence. Specifically, combined with breathwork, intentional meditation can provide self-healing, manifestation, pain elimination, and guide to self-realization.

A Man Without a Country

Author: Kurt Vonnegut

Publisher: Seven Stories Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 160

View: 709

A Man Without a Country is Kurt Vonnegut’s hilariously funny and razor-sharp look at life ("If I die—God forbid—I would like to go to heaven to ask somebody in charge up there, ‘Hey, what was the good news and what was the bad news?"), art ("To practice any art, no matter how well or badly, is a way to make your soul grow. So do it."), politics ("I asked former Yankees pitcher Jim Bouton what he thought of our great victory over Iraq and he said, ‘Mohammed Ali versus Mr. Rogers.’"), and the condition of the soul of America today ("What has happened to us?"). Based on short essays and speeches composed over the last five years and plentifully illustrated with artwork by the author throughout, A Man Without a Country gives us Vonnegut both speaking out with indignation and writing tenderly to his fellow Americans, sometimes joking, at other times hopeless, always searching.

The Woman Without a Hole - & Other Risky Themes from Old Japanese Poems

Author: Robin D. Gill

Publisher: Paraverse Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 490

View: 942

17-syllabet Japanese poems about human foibles, sans season (i.e., not haiku), were introduced a half-century ago by RH Blyth in two books, "Edo Satirical Verse Anthologies" and "Japanese Life and Character in Senryu." Blyth regretted having to introduce not the best senryu, but only the best that were clean enough to pass the censors. In this anthology, compiled, translated and essayed by Robin D. Gill, like Blyth, a renowned translator of thousands of haiku, we find 1,300 of the senryu (and zappai) that would once have been dangerous to publish. The book is not just an anthology of dirty poems such as Legman's classic "Limericks" or Burford's delightful "Bawdy Verse," but probing essays of thirty themes representative of the eros - both real and imaginary - of Edo, at the time, the world's largest city. Japanese themselves use senryu for historical documentation of social attitudes and cultural practices; thousands of senryu (and the related zappai), including many poems we might consider obscene, serve as examples in the Japanese equivalent of the OED (nipponkokugodaijiten). The specialized argot, obscure allusions and ellipsis that make reading dirty senryu a delightful riddle for one who knows just enough to be challenged yet not defeated, make them impenetrable to outsiders, so this educational yet entertaining resource has not been accessible to most students of Japanese (and the limited translations prove that even professors have difficulty with it). This book tries to accomplish the impossible: it includes all the information - original poems, pronunciation, explanation, glossary - needed to help specialists improve their senryu reading skills, while refraining from full citations to leave plenty of room for the curious monolingual to skip about the eclectic goodies. [Published simultaneously with two titles as an experiment.]

World Court

Hearings Before the Committee on Foreign Relations, United States Senate, Seventy-second Congress, First Session, Relative to Executive A (71st Congress), Protocols Concerning Adherence of the United States to the Court of International Justice. April 6 and May 7, 1932

Author: United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Foreign Relations

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: International law

Page: 58

View: 431

Considers U.S. reservations concerning adherence to Court of International Justice (World Court) based upon Court acceptance of limited jurisdiction in matters involving U.S. and assent to women's equal nationality status.

Man Without a Country

Author: Jeff Prebis

Publisher: Permuted Press

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 252

View: 387

John McCoy, guidance counselor, is not quite sane, as evidenced by the purchase of a chimp shortly after his family was murdered. Bobby Dupri, student, may be the Anti-Christ, bent on creating a world populated only by white people. An unusual epidemic breaks when people are mentally reprogrammed after going to social networks or checking their email. Even stranger, they begin building things with the items they collected. Then nuclear bombs start destroying cities while an army gathers in the ashes, eager to take over the nation. Will America just be a pile of ash owned by an invisible army of a monster’s creation? Only a barely sane guidance counselor, the nurse at his school, and his pet chimp stand in their way.

The Man Without a Country and Other Tales

Author: Edward Everett Hale

Publisher: Wildside Press LLC

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 224

View: 382

A collection of short stories by Civil War-era author Hale, including a short fantasy entitled "My Double and How He Undid Me."

A Mother For His Daughter

Author: Ally Blake

Publisher: Harlequin

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 192

View: 872

Just as Gracie had run out of money and was about to book her flight home to Australia, she'd been rescued! A gorgeous Italian had hired her to live in his magnificent Tuscan home and be nanny to his little girl! Luca was just as thrilled—for the first time since he'd lost his wife smiles and laughter were back in his daughter's life. He didn't want Gracie to leave, so he had a proposal for her: would she stay…as his rwife? It was the hardest decision of Gracie's life. She I loved both Luca and Mila—but was Luca proposing because he loved her…or because he just wanted a mother for his daughter.?

Development Has a Woman's Face

Insights from Within the U.N.

Author: Krishna Ahooja-Patel

Publisher: APH Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 412

View: 880

This book analyzes the concepts that have transformed the 'woman question' into the current notion of 'gender mainstreaming' from the 1970s to 2005.

Routledge International Encyclopedia of Women

Global Women's Issues and Knowledge

Author: Cheris Kramarae

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 2050

View: 895

For a full list of entries and contributors, sample entries, and more, visit the Routledge International Encyclopedia of Women website. Featuring comprehensive global coverage of women's issues and concerns, from violence and sexuality to feminist theory, the Routledge International Encyclopedia of Women brings the field into the new millennium. In over 900 signed A-Z entries from US and Europe, Asia, the Americas, Oceania, and the Middle East, the women who pioneered the field from its inception collaborate with the new scholars who are shaping the future of women's studies to create the new standard work for anyone who needs information on women-related subjects.

Modeling Minority Women

Heroines in African and Asian American Fiction

Author: Reshmi J. Hebbar

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 288

View: 590

This powerful study reconceptualizes ideas of ethnic literature while investigating the construction of ethnic heroines, shifting the focus away from cultural politics and considering instead narrative or poetic qualities which involve surprising relationships between Anglo-American women's writing and fiction produced by Asian American and African American women authors.

Old World, New World

America and Europe in the Age of Jefferson

Author: Leonard J. Sadosky

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 287

View: 143

Old World, New World: America and Europe in the Age of Jefferson grew out of workshops in Salzburg and Charlottesville sponsored by Monticello’s International Center for Jefferson Studies, and revisits a question of long-standing interest to American historians: the nature of the relationship between America and Europe during the Age of Revolution. Study of the American-European relationship in recent years has been moved forward by the notion of Atlantic history and the study of the Atlantic world. The present volume makes a fresh contribution by refocusing attention on the question of the interdependence of Europe and America. Old World, New World addresses topics that are timely, given contemporary public events, but that are also of interest to early modern and modern historians. By turning attention from the Atlantic World in general to the relationship between America and Europe, as well as using Thomas Jefferson as a lens to examine this relationship, this book carves out its own niche in the history of the Atlantic world in the age of revolution.

Those Good Gertrudes

A Social History of Women Teachers in America

Author: Geraldine J. Clifford

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 496

View: 762

Those Good Gertrudes explores the professional, civic, and personal roles of women teachers throughout American history. Its voice, themes, and findings build from the mostly unpublished writings of many women and their families, colleagues, and pupils. Geraldine J. Clifford studied personal history manuscripts in archives and consulted printed autobiographies, diaries, correspondence, oral histories, interviews—even film and fiction—to probe the multifaceted imagery that has surrounded teaching. This broad ranging, inclusive, and comparative work surveys a long past where schoolteaching was essentially men's work, with women relegated to restricted niches such as teaching rudiments of the vernacular language to young children and socializing girls for traditional gender roles. Clifford documents and explains the emergence of women as the prototypical schoolteachers in the United States, a process apparent in the late colonial period and continuing through the nineteenth century, when they became the majority of American public and private schoolteachers. The capstone of Clifford’s distinguished career and the definitive book on women teachers in America, Those Good Gertrudes will engage scholars in the history of education and women’s history, teachers past, present, and future, and readers with vivid memories of their own teachers.

The Sovereign Citizen

Denaturalization and the Origins of the American Republic

Author: Patrick Weil

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 296

View: 661

Present-day Americans feel secure in their citizenship: they are free to speak up for any cause, oppose their government, marry a person of any background, and live where they choose—at home or abroad. Denaturalization and denationalization are more often associated with twentieth-century authoritarian regimes. But there was a time when American-born and naturalized foreign-born individuals in the United States could be deprived of their citizenship and its associated rights. Patrick Weil examines the twentieth-century legal procedures, causes, and enforcement of denaturalization to illuminate an important but neglected dimension of Americans' understanding of sovereignty and federal authority: a citizen is defined, in part, by the parameters that could be used to revoke that same citizenship. The Sovereign Citizen begins with the Naturalization Act of 1906, which was intended to prevent realization of citizenship through fraudulent or illegal means. Denaturalization—a process provided for by one clause of the act—became the main instrument for the transfer of naturalization authority from states and local courts to the federal government. Alongside the federalization of naturalization, a conditionality of citizenship emerged: for the first half of the twentieth century, naturalized individuals could be stripped of their citizenship not only for fraud but also for affiliations with activities or organizations that were perceived as un-American. (Emma Goldman's case was the first and perhaps best-known denaturalization on political grounds, in 1909.) By midcentury the Supreme Court was fiercely debating cases and challenged the constitutionality of denaturalization and denationalization. This internal battle lasted almost thirty years. The Warren Court's eventual decision to uphold the sovereignty of the citizen—not the state—secures our national order to this day. Weil's account of this transformation, and the political battles fought by its advocates and critics, reshapes our understanding of American citizenship.

States Without Nations

Citizenship for Mortals

Author: Jacqueline Stevens

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 384

View: 779

As citizens, we hold certain truths to be self-evident: that the rights to own land, marry, inherit property, and especially to assume birthright citizenship should be guaranteed by the state. The laws promoting these rights appear not only to preserve our liberty but to guarantee society remains just. Yet considering how much violence and inequality results from these legal mandates, Jacqueline Stevens asks whether we might be making the wrong assumptions. Would a world without such laws be more just? Arguing that the core laws of the nation-state are more about a fear of death than a desire for freedom, Jacqueline Stevens imagines a world in which birthright citizenship, family inheritance, state-sanctioned marriage, and private land ownership are eliminated. Would chaos be the result? Drawing on political theory and history and incorporating contemporary social and economic data, she brilliantly critiques our sentimental attachments to birthright citizenship, inheritance, and marriage and highlights their harmful outcomes, including war, global apartheid, destitution, family misery, and environmental damage. It might be hard to imagine countries without the rules of membership and ownership that have come to define them, but as Stevens shows, conjuring new ways of reconciling our laws with the condition of mortality reveals the flaws of our present institutions and inspires hope for moving beyond them.

Writing New Identities

Gender, Nation, and Immigration in Contemporary Europe

Author: Gisela Brinker-Gabler

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 392

View: 639

A Country Christmas

An Anthology

Author: Debbie Macomber

Publisher: Harlequin

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 400

View: 562

A Country Christmas might be the best Christmas of all… Buffalo Valley The town of Buffalo Valley, North Dakota—a community in farm country—is undergoing a revival. Vaughn Kyle, who's just out of the army, is looking for a place to live, a life to live. While he's waiting for his ambitious fiancée to make up her mind, he visits Buffalo Valley one snowy day and meets a young woman named Carrie Hendrickson. As they grow close, Vaughn has to question his feelings for the woman he thought he loved. He knows then that he wants to stay in Buffalo Valley, where life is about family and friends—not money and social standing. And not just at Christmas, but every day of the year… Return to Promise Rancher Cal Patterson and his wife, Jane—known as Dr. Texas—have recently separated, with Jane going back to her childhood home in California with their children. Now Cal, alone on his ranch, is forced to confront what he really wants in his life, what he needs. Jane is confronting the same questions. How seriously does Cal take his marriage vows? And how important is Promise to Jane? Is there hope for a reconciliation—in time for Christmas?