A Voyage to Arcturus

Author: David Lindsay

Publisher: DigiCat

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 232

View: 666

A Voyage to Arctus is a fantasy and philosophical novel about an interstellar voyage in the orbit of the imaginary star system Arcturus, which consists of two stars, Branchspell and Alppain. While traveling between the stars, the protagonist passes through different philosophical systems or states of mind. The whole journey is a metaphor for searching for the meaning of life. Some critics considered this book as the best in the 20th century. Moreover, it has inspired Tolkien the creation of legendary trilogy.

A Voyage to Arcturus (航向大角星)

Author: David Lindsay

Publisher: Hyweb Technology Co. Ltd.

ISBN:

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 23

View: 621

Scottish novelist David Lindsay (1876-1945) was born to a middle-class Calvinist family, forced by poverty to work as an insurance clerk instead of attending university, and at the age of forty took up the cause and worked his way to Corporal of the Royal Army Pay Corps in World War I. After the war he moved to Cornwall with his wife and began writing full-time, publishing his first novel, "A Voyage to Arcturus," in 1920. Although the science fiction novel initially sold less than six hundred copies, it has come to be known as a major "underground" novel of the 20th century, and heavily influenced C.S. Lewis's "Out of the Silent Planet." The story is set at Tormance, an imaginary planet orbiting Arcturus, where an adventurous Scot named Muskall has travelled and where he encounters myriad characters and lands that reflect Lindsay's critique of various philosophical systems.

A Voyage to Arcturus (Penguin Science Fiction) Annotated

Author: David Lindsay

Publisher: Independently Published

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 280

View: 903

On hearing the title A Voyage to Arcturus, one might picture an astronaut strapping themselves into a rocket and flying into space for a swashbuckling adventure. Nothing could be further from what this book actually is.Voyage is in fact a fascinating, bizarre, bewildering, and thought-provoking sort of acid-fueled Pilgrim's Progress: a philosophical allegory told through the frame of a psychedelic gender-bending journey to an alien planet.After a terrifying seance, the protagonist, Maskull, is offered the chance of an adventure on a different world. He agrees, and the reader follows him on his blood-soaked path through lands representing different philosophies and ways of life as he searches for the world's godhead, Surtur. Or is it Crystalman?Voyage features fiction wildly ahead of its time, and is hardly classifiable as either science fiction or fantasy; one might even say that the book is better approached as a philosophical work than a straightforward narrative. It's not a book for a reader seeking simple fiction, but rather for a reader seeking a thoughtful, imaginative, and totally unexpected exploration of philosophy and of life.Decades ahead of its time, Voyage was praised by contemporaries like C. S. Lewis and J. R. R. Tolkien, and by modern authors like Clive Barker and Alan Moore. Many modern reviewers consider it a masterpiece of 20th century fiction and the work of an underappreciated genius. A century later it boasts a significant cult following, having inspired modern sequels by authors including Harold Bloom, as well as movies, plays, albums, and even operas.

The Greenwood Encyclopedia of Science Fiction and Fantasy

Themes, Works, and Wonders

Author: Gary Westfahl

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: Fantasy fiction, American

Page: 520

View: 817

A comprehensive three-volume reference work offers six hundred entries, with the first two volumes covering themes and the third volume exploring two hundred classic works in literature, television, and film.

A Voyage to Arcturus | The Pink Classics

Author: David Lindsay

Publisher: Sheba Blake Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 237

View: 503

A Voyage to Arcturus is a novel by Scottish writer David Lindsay. It combines fantasy, philosophy, and science fiction in an exploration of the nature of good and evil and their relationship with existence. Critic and philosopher Colin Wilson described it as the "greatest novel of the twentieth century", and it was a central influence on C. S. Lewis' Space Trilogy. J. R. R. Tolkien said he read the book "with avidity". Clive Barker has stated " A Voyage to Arcturus is a masterpiece" and called it "an extraordinary work . . . quite magnificent." An interstellar voyage is the framework for a narrative of a journey through fantastic landscapes. The story is set at Tormance, an imaginary planet orbiting Arcturus, which, in the novel (but not in reality) is a double star system, consisting of stars Branchspell and Alppain. The lands through which the characters travel represent philosophical systems or states of mind, through which the main character, Maskull, passes on his search for the meaning of life. Maskull, a man longing for adventures, accepts an invitation from Krag, an acquaintance of his friend Nightspore, to travel to Tormance after a seance. The three set off in a crystal ship from an abandoned observatory in Scotland but Maskull awakens to find himself alone on Tormance. In every land he passes through he usually meets only one or two persons; these meetings often (though not always) end in the death of those he meets, either at his own hand or by that of another. He learns of his own impending death, meets Krag again, and dies shortly after learning that he is in fact Nightspore himself. The book concludes with a final revelation from Krag (who claims to be known on Earth as "Pain") to Nightspore about the origin of the Universe. The author turns out to support a variation of the doctrine of the Demiurge, somewhat similar to that propounded by some Gnostics.

A Voyage to Arcturus

A Sci-Fi Classic

Author: David Lindsay

Publisher: e-artnow

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 242

View: 477

This carefully crafted ebook: "A Voyage to Arcturus" is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. A Voyage to Arcturus combines fantasy, philosophy, and science fiction in an exploration of the nature of good and evil and their relationship with existence. Described by critic and philosopher Colin Wilson as the "greatest novel of the twentieth century", it was a central influence on C. S. Lewis' Space Trilogy, and through him on J. R. R. Tolkien, who said he read the book "with avidity". An interstellar voyage is the framework for a narrative of a journey through fantastic landscapes. The story is set at Tormance, an imaginary planet orbiting Arcturus, which, in the novel (but not in reality) is a double star system, consisting of stars Branchspell and Alppain. The lands through which the characters travel represent philosophical systems or states of mind, through which the main character, Maskull, passes on his search for the meaning of life. David Lindsay was an author now best remembered for the philosophical science fiction novel A Voyage to Arcturus. The secret of Lindsay's originality as a novelist lies in his metaphysical assumptions.

A Voyage to Arcturus

An Interstellar Voyage

Author: David Lindsay

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 174

View: 864

An Interstellar Voyage Classic Science Fiction A Voyage to Arcturus By David Lindsay A Voyage to Arcturus is a novel by Scottish writer David Lindsay, first published in 1920. It combines fantasy, philosophy, and science fiction in an exploration of the nature of good and evil and their relationship with existence. Critic and philosopher Colin Wilson described it as the "greatest novel of the twentieth century", and it was a central influence on C. S. Lewis' Space Trilogy. J. R. R. Tolkien said he read the book "with avidity". Clive Barker has stated " A Voyage to Arcturus is a masterpiece" and called it "an extraordinary work . . . quite magnificent." An interstellar voyage is the framework for a narrative of a journey through fantastic landscapes. The story is set at Tormance, an imaginary planet orbiting Arcturus, which, in the novel (but not in reality) is a double star system, consisting of stars Branchspell and Alppain. The lands through which the characters travel represent philosophical systems or states of mind, through which the main character, Maskull, passes on his search for the meaning of life. Maskull, a man longing for adventures, accepts an invitation from Krag, an acquaintance of his friend Nightspore, to travel to Tormance after a seance. The three set off in a crystal ship from an abandoned observatory in Scotland but Maskull awakens to find himself alone on Tormance. In every land he passes through he usually meets only one or two persons; these meetings often (though not always) end in the death of those he meets, either at his own hand or by that of another. He learns of his own impending death, meets Krag again, and dies shortly after learning that he is in fact Nightspore himself. The book concludes with a final revelation from Krag (who claims to be known on Earth as "Pain") to Nightspore about the origin of the Universe. The author turns out to support a variation of the doctrine of the Demiurge, somewhat similar to that propounded by some Gnostics. All of the characters and lands are types used to convey the author's critique of several philosophical systems. On Tormance, most such viewpoints or ways of life are accompanied by corresponding new bodily sense organs or modifications of the same, thus each distinct Weltanschauung landscape has its corresponding sensorium.

A Voyage to Arcturus & The Haunted Woman

2 Books in One Edition

Author: David Lindsay

Publisher: e-artnow

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 410

View: 969

This carefully crafted ebook: "A Voyage to Arcturus & The Haunted Woman" is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. A Voyage to Arcturus - The story is set at Tormance, an imaginary planet orbiting Arcturus, which, in the novel is a double star system, consisting of stars Branchspell and Alppain. The lands through which the characters travel represent philosophical systems or states of mind, through which the main character, Maskull, passes on his search for the meaning of life. Described by critic and philosopher Colin Wilson as the "greatest novel of the twentieth century", it was a central influence on C. S. Lewis' Space Trilogy, and through him on J. R. R. Tolkien, who said he read the book "with avidity". The Haunted Woman - Isabel Loment, engaged to the ordinary and unexceptional Marshall Stokes, leads a peripatetic existence as the ward of her aunt, Ann Moor. Their travels take them to the downlands of Sussex, to Runhill Court, an ancient home owned by Henry Judge. There Isabel discovers a strange staircase few can see, which leads upwards to three doors. She chooses one, which opens onto a room that appears to exist only part of the time; what might lie behind the other doors remains a mystery…. David Lindsay was an author now best remembered for the philosophical science fiction novel A Voyage to Arcturus. The secret of Lindsay's originality as a novelist lies in his metaphysical assumptions.

Colin Wilson, the Outsider and Beyond

Author: Clifford P. Bendau

Publisher: Wildside Press LLC

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 63

View: 909

Wilson, who is acknowledged for the consistently high quality of his prose, whether it be fiction, nonfiction, or criticism, has refused to accept the limitations of genre or form, or to be placed in some literary cubbyhole. Clifford P. Bendau here covers Wilson's work, from his first appearance as a literary enfant terrible, to the publication of his landmark novel, The Space Vampyres (1976), regarded by many critics as one of his finest works.

David Lindsay

Author: Gary K. Wolfe

Publisher: Wildside Press LLC

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 64

View: 936

Gary K. Wolfe examines the life and work of British author David Lindsay, most famous for his novels "A Voyage to Arcturus," "The Haunted Woman," and "The Devil's Tor." Starmont Reader's Guide 9.