A Time In Rome

Author: Elizabeth Bowen

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: Travel

Page: 256

View: 100

Elizabeth Bowen's account of a time spent in Rome is no ordinary guidebook but an evocation of a city - its history, its architecture and, above all, its atmosphere. She describes the famous classical sites, conjuring from the ruins visions of former inhabitants and their often bloody activities and speculates about the immense noise of ancient Rome, the problems caused by the Romans' dining posture, and the Roman temperament. She evokes the city's moods - by day, when it is characterised by golden sunlight, and at night, when the blaze of the moon 'annihilates history'.

Cicero

The Life and Times of Rome's Greatest Politician

Author: Anthony Everitt

Publisher: Random House Incorporated

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 359

View: 169

A lively portrait of the quintessential Roman politician describes the life and times of the ancient statesman, based on the witty and candid letters that Cicero wrote to his friend Atticus in which he described the events and personalities that shaped the final days of Republican Rome. 25,000 first printing.

A Time of Rome

The Empress Galla Placidia

Author: Aniello Agostino Oliviero

Publisher: AuthorHouse

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 456

View: 440

Add Galla Placida to the annals of the dominant, lustful women rulers of empires Cleopatra, Elizabeth the I, and Catherine the Great. These three have been historically exposed but are presented at their mature state when they have achieved notoriety. Their formative years have been all but neglected as irrelevant. In this novel, Galla Placidia is taken from birth to her fate as regent empress for her son Valentinian the third. We see her from innocence through maturity where her beauty and Roman potency drew suitors of position and means - but love and romance superceded all and threw her into the arms of a barbarian.

There Was a Time When Rome Was Ruled by Kings

Author: Dario Bollacasa

Publisher: AuthorHouse

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 48

View: 555

We think of ancient Rome mostly in terms of its Empire. But, before the Empire there was a Republic and before that there were Kings. They were responsible for Rome's dominant role in Central Italy, for organizing the Roman society and its religious institutions. Legend and fact are intertwined to make for fascinating reading.

Time Out Rome

Author: Editors of Time Out

Publisher: Time Out Guides

ISBN:

Category: Travel

Page: 368

View: 906

Written by local experts, Time Out Rome provides extensive coverage of the major sights — and then goes much further. Featuring everything from born-again trattorie to the burgeoning apertif trend, it offers visitors the chance to experience the Eternal City as the Romans do. History in Rome is not confined to museums, basilicas and galleries — it tumbles out everywhere. And though the city is reassuringly compact, this does not stop the cultural onslaught from being utterly bewildering and exhausting. While some travelers may have to face the fact that they probably won't see everything, it is also important not to shut oneself up inside all day looking at collections and sites or you will miss all that the outdoor scene has to offer. Time Out Rome helps travelers navigate through the cobblestone streets, so that they can eat, drink and shop like the natives. Suggested side trips out of town are also explored.

Rome

A City Out of Print

Author: Rose Marie San Juan

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 837

"Focusing on images and descriptions of movement and spectacle - everyday street activities, congregations in market piazzas, life in the Jewish ghetto and the plague hospital, papal and other ceremonial processions, public punishment, and pilgrimage routes - Rose Marie San Juan uncovers the social tensions and conflicts within seventeenth-century Roman society that are both concealed within and prompted by mass-produced representations of the city. These depictions of Rome - guidebooks, street posters, broadsheets and brochures, topographic and thematic maps, city views, and collectible images of landmarks and other famous sights - redefined the ways in which public space was experienced, controlled, and utilized, encouraging tourists, pilgrims, and penitents while constraining the activities and movements of women, merchants, dissidents, and Jews."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Rome Across Time and Space

Cultural Transmission and the Exchange of Ideas, C.500-1400

Author: Claudia Bolgia

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 351

View: 762

An exploration of the significance of medieval Rome, both as a physical city and an idea with immense cultural capital.

Ancient Rome

From Romulus to Justinian

Author: Thomas R. Martin

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 237

View: 253

Presents a history of the ancient Roman civilization, with a focus on the values that propelled its rise and fall.

On the Wings of Time

Rome, the Incas, Spain, and Peru

Author: Sabine MacCormack

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 509

Historians have long recognized that the classical heritage of ancient Rome contributed to the development of a vibrant society in Spanish South America, but was the impact a one-way street? Although the Spanish destruction of the Incan empire changed the Andes forever, the civil society that did emerge was not the result of Andeans and Creoles passively absorbing the wisdom of ancient Rome. Rather, Sabine MacCormack proposes that civil society was born of the intellectual endeavors that commenced with the invasion itself, as the invaders sought to understand an array of cultures. Looking at the sixteenth- and seventeenth-century people who wrote about the Andean region that became Peru, MacCormack reveals how the lens of Rome had a profound influence on Spanish understanding of the Incan empire. Tracing the varied events that shaped Peru as a country, MacCormack shows how Roman and classical literature provided a framework for the construal of historical experience. She turns to issues vital to Latin American history, such as the role of language in conquest, the interpretation of civil war, and the founding of cities, to paint a dynamic picture of the genesis of renewed political life in the Andean region. Examining how missionaries, soldiers, native lords, and other writers employed classical concepts to forge new understandings of Peruvian society and history, the book offers a complete reassessment of the ways in which colonial Peru made the classical heritage uniquely its own.

Lectures on the History of Rome

From the Earliest Times to the Fall of the Western Empire

Author: Barthold Georg Niebuhr

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Rome

Page:

View: 154

The Fall of Rome

And the End of Civilization

Author: Bryan Ward-Perkins

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 239

View: 954

Was the fall of Rome a great catastrophe that cast the West into darkness for centuries to come? Or, as scholars argue today, was there no crisis at all, but simply a peaceful blending of barbarians into Roman culture, an essentially positive transformation? In The Fall of Rome, eminent historian Bryan Ward-Perkins argues that the "peaceful" theory of Rome's "transformation" is badly in error. Indeed, he sees the fall of Rome as a time of horror and dislocation that destroyed a great civilization, throwing the inhabitants of the West back to a standard of living typical of prehistoric times. Attacking contemporary theories with relish and making use of modern archaeological evidence, he looks at both the wider explanations for the disintegration of the Roman world and also the consequences for the lives of everyday Romans, who were caught in a world of economic collapse, marauding barbarians, and the rise of a new religious orthodoxy. The book recaptures the drama and violence of the last days of the Roman world, and reminds us of the very real terrors of barbarian occupation. Equally important, Ward-Perkins contends that a key problem with the new way of looking at the end of the ancient world is that all difficulty and awkwardness is smoothed out into a steady and positive transformation of society. Nothing ever goes badly wrong in this vision of the past. The evidence shows otherwise. Up to date and brilliantly written, combining a lively narrative with the latest research and thirty illustrations, this superb volume reclaims the drama, the violence, and the tragedy of the fall of Rome.

The Renaissance in Rome

Author: Charles L. Stinger

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 444

View: 866

From the middle of the fifteenth century a distinctively Roman Renaissance occurred. A shared outlook, a persistent set of intellectual concerns, similar cultural assumptions and a commitment to common ideological aims bound Roman humanists and artists to a uniquely Roman world, different from Florence, Venice, and other Italian and European centers.This book provides the first comprehensive portrait of the Roman Renaissance world. Charles Stinger probes the basic attitudes, the underlying values and the core convictions that Rome's intellectuals and artists experienced, lived for, and believed in from Pope Eugenius IV's reign to the Eternal City in 1443 to the sacking of 1527. He demonstrates that the Roman Renaissance was not the creation of one towering intellectual leader, or of a single identifiable group; rather, it embodied the aspirations of dozens of figures, active over an eighty-year period.Stinger illuminates the general aims and character of the Roman Renaissance. Remaining mindful of the economic, social, and political context--Rome's retarded economic growth, the papacy's increasing entanglement in Italian politics, papal preoccupation with the crusade against the Ottomans, and the effects of papal fiscal and administrative practices--Stinger nevertheless maintains that these developments recede in importance before the cultural history of the period. Only in the context of the ideological and cultural commitments of Roman humanists, artists, and architects can one fully understand the motivation for papal policies. Reality for Renaissance Romans was intricately bound up with the notion of Rome's mythic destiny.The Renaissance in Rome is cultural history at its best. It evokes the moods, myths, images, and symbols of the Eternal City, as they are manifested in the Liturgy, ceremony, festivals, oratory, art, and architecture of Renaissance Rome. Throughout, Stinger focuses on a persistent constellation of fundamental themes: the image of the city of Rome, the restoration of the Roman Church, the renewal of the Roman Empire, and the fullness of time. He describes and analyzes the content, meaning, origin, and implications of these central ideas of Roman Renaissance.This book will prove interesting to both Renaissance and Reformation scholars, as well as to general readers, who may have visited (or plan to visit) Rome and have become fascinated and affected by this extraordinary city. "There is no other book like it in any language," says Renaissance historian John O'Malley. "It presents a coherent view of Roman culture....collects and presents a vast amount of information never before housed under one roof. Anyone who teaches the Italian Renaissance," O'Malley stresses, "will have to know this book."

Rome and its Empire, AD 193-284

Author: Olivier Hekster

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 869

This was a time of civil war, anarchy, intrigue, and assassination.Between 193 and 284 the Roman Empire knew more than twenty-five emperors, and an equal number of usurpers. All of them had some measure of success, several of them often ruling different parts of the Empire at the same time. Rome's traditional political institutions slid into vacuity and armies became the Empire's most powerful institutions, proclaiming their own imperial champions and deposing those they held to be incompetent.Yet despite widespread contemporary dismay at such weak government this period was also one in which the boundaries of the Empire remained fairly stable; the rights and privileges of Roman citizenship were extended equally to all free citizens of the Empire; in several regions the economy remained robust in the face of rampant inflation; and literary culture, philosophy, and legal theory flourished. Historians have been discussing how and why this could have been for centuries. Olivier Hekster takes you to th

The Time-Tripping Faradays: The Dragon of Rome

Author: John Seven

Publisher: Capstone

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 160

View: 696

In Rome during the time of Vespasian, time travelers Dawkins and Hypatia Faraday join up with Pliny the Elder who is researching dragons for his natural history encyclopedia, which seems like a harmless activity until a real fire-breathing dragon attacks them.

Women Writers of Ancient Greece and Rome

An Anthology

Author: Ian Michael Plant

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 268

View: 914

Despite a common perception that most writing in antiquity was produced by men, some important literature written by women during this period has survived. Edited by I. M. Plant, Women Writers of Ancient Greece and Rome is a comprehensive anthology of the surviving literary texts of women writers from the Graeco-Roman world that offers new English translations from the works of more than fifty women. From Sappho, who lived in the seventh century B.C., to Eudocia and Egeria of the fifth century A.D., the texts presented here come from a wide range of sources and span the fields of poetry and prose. Each author is introduced with a critical review of what we know about the writer, her work, and its significance, along with a discussion of the texts that follow. A general introduction looks into the problem of the authenticity of some texts attributed to women and places their literature into the wider literary and social contexts of the ancient Graeco-Roman world.

When in Rome

2000 Years of Roman Sightseeing

Author: Matthew Sturgis

Publisher: Frances Lincoln

ISBN:

Category: Travel

Page: 296

View: 164

DIV There is no place like Rome. Throughout its long, long history, its many changes in form and fortune, Rome has always been a tourist centre. In every age - Classical, Christian, Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Neoclassical, Romantic, Modern, people have flocked to see its wonders. This is the story of what Rome's visitors have looked at over the past two thousand years, the buildings, the statues, the paintings, the artefacts that have most impressed each generation of travellers from the time of the Roman Republic in the second century BC up to the present age of mass tourism. It is the history both of how Rome has changed with the centuries and how the taste of those who have visited the city has changed with it. /div

Stars, Myths and Rituals in Etruscan Rome

Author: Leonardo Magini

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 181

View: 833

This book offers a detailed and fascinating picture of the astonishing astronomical knowledge on which the Roman calendar, traditionally attributed to the king Numa Pompilius (reign 715-673 B.C.), was based. This knowledge, of Mesopotamian origins, related mainly to the planetary movements and to the occurrence of eclipses in the solar system. The author explains the Numan year and cycle and illustrates clearly how astronomical phenomena exerted a powerful influence over both public and private life. A series of concise chapters examine the dates of the Roman festivals, describe the related rites and myths and place the festivals in relation to the planetary movements and astronomical events. Special reference is made to the movements of the moon and Venus, their relation to the language of myth, and the particular significance that Venus was considered to have for female fertility. The book clearly demonstrates the depth of astronomical knowledge reflected in the Roman religious calendar and the designated festive days. It will appeal both to learned connoisseurs and to amateurs with a particular interest in the subject.

Rome

The Biography of a City

Author: Christopher Hibbert

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 387

View: 819

A portrait, a history and a superb guide book - this beautifully written, informative study captures the seductive beauty and the many-layered past of the Eternal City. From its quasi-mythical origins, through the opulent glory of classical Rome, the decadence and decay of the Middle Ages and the beauty and corruption of the Renaissance, to its time at the heart of Mussolini's fascist Italy, Christopher Hibbert details the turbulent and dramatic history of this extraordinary place.