A Storied Sage

Canon and Creation in the Making of a Japanese Buddha

Author: Micah L. Auerback

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 256

View: 883

Since its arrival in Japan in the sixth century, Buddhism has played a central role in Japanese culture. But the historical figure of the Buddha, the prince of ancient Indian descent who abandoned his wealth and power to become an awakened being, has repeatedly disappeared and reappeared, emerging each time in a different form and to different ends. A Storied Sage traces this transformation of concepts of the Buddha, from Japan’s ancient period in the eighth century to the end of the Meiji period in the early twentieth century. Micah L. Auerback follows the changing fortune of the Buddha through the novel uses for the Buddha’s story in high and low culture alike, often outside of the confines of the Buddhist establishment. Auerback argues for the Buddha’s continuing relevance during Japan’s early modern period and links the later Buddhist tradition in Japan to its roots on the Asian continent. Additionally, he examines the afterlife of the Buddha in hagiographic literature, demonstrating that the late Japanese Buddha, far from fading into a ghost of his former self, instead underwent an important reincarnation. Challenging many established assumptions about Buddhism and its evolution in Japan, A Storied Sage is a vital contribution to the larger discussion of religion and secularization in modernity.

The SAGE Handbook of Educational Action Research

Author: Susan E Noffke

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 568

View: 820

This handbook presents and critiques predominant and emergent traditions of Educational Action Research internationally. Now a prominent methodology, Educational Action Research is well suited to exploring, developing and sustaining change processes both in classrooms and whole organisations such as schools, Departments of Education, and many segments of universities. The handbook contains theoretical and practical based chapters by highly respected scholars whose work has been seminal in building knowledge and expertise in the field. It also contains chapters exemplifying the work of prominent practitioner and community groups working outside universities. The Editors provide an introduction and conclusion, as well as an opening chapter which charts the historical development of action research and provides an analysis of its underlying theories. The handbook is organized into four sections, each beginning with a short introduction: - Action research methodology: diversity of rationales and practices - Professional: Knowledge production, staff development, and the status of educators - Personal: Self-awareness, development and identity - Political: Popular knowledge, difference, and frameworks for change This is a key resource for scholars and graduate students at doctors and masters levels, as well as school leaders and administrators. Susan Noffke is Associate Professor of Curriculum & Instruction at the University of Illinois - Urbana/Champaign and co-editor with R.B. Stevenson of Educational Action Research (Teachers College Press, 1995). She taught at the primary school level for a decade, and has led masters and doctoral level courses in action research for the past 20 years. She continues to work with many collaborative projects with schools and school districts. Bridget Somekh is Professor of Educational Research at Manchester Metropolitan University, UK. She is a founder editor of the Educational Action Research journal and has been a co-ordinator of the Collaborative Action Research Network (CARN) for many years. She is co-editor of Research Methods in the Social Sciences (SAGE: 2005) and author of Action Research: a Methodology for Change and Development (Open University Press: 2006).

The SAGE Encyclopedia of Qualitative Research Methods

Author: Lisa M. Given

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 1072

View: 236

Qualitative research is designed to explore the human elements of a given topic, while specific qualitative methods examine how individuals see and experience the world. Qualitative approaches are typically used to explore new phenomena and to capture individuals' thoughts, feelings, or interpretations of meaning and process. Such methods are central to research conducted in education, nursing, sociology, anthropology, information studies, and other disciplines in the humanities, social sciences, and health sciences. Qualitative research projects are informed by a wide range of methodologies and theoretical frameworks. The SAGE Encyclopedia of Qualitative Research Methods presents current and complete information as well as ready-to-use techniques, facts, and examples from the field of qualitative research in a very accessible style. In taking an interdisciplinary approach, these two volumes target a broad audience and fill a gap in the existing reference literature for a general guide to the core concepts that inform qualitative research practices. The entries cover every major facet of qualitative methods, including access to research participants, data coding, research ethics, the role of theory in qualitative research, and much more—all without overwhelming the informed reader. Key Features Defines and explains core concepts, describes the techniques involved in the implementation of qualitative methods, and presents an overview of qualitative approaches to research Offers many entries that point to substantive debates among qualitative researchers regarding how concepts are labeled and the implications of such labels for how qualitative research is valued Guides readers through the complex landscape of the language of qualitative inquiry Includes contributors from various countries and disciplines that reflect a diverse spectrum of research approaches from more traditional, positivist approaches, through postmodern, constructionist ones Presents some entries written in first-person voice and others in third-person voice to reflect the diversity of approaches that define qualitative work Key Themes Approaches and Methodologies Arts-Based Research, Ties to Computer Software Data Analysis Data Collection Data Types and Characteristics Dissemination History of Qualitative Research Participants Quantitative Research, Ties to Research Ethics Rigor Textual Analysis, Ties to Theoretical and Philosophical Frameworks The SAGE Encyclopedia of Qualitative Research Methods is designed to appeal to undergraduate and graduate students, practitioners, researchers, consultants, and consumers of information across the social sciences, humanities, and health sciences, making it a welcome addition to any academic or public library.

The SAGE Encyclopedia of Social Science Research Methods

Author: Michael Lewis-Beck

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 1528

View: 160

"This defining work will be valuable to readers and researchers in social sciences and humanities at all academic levels. As a teaching resource it will be useful to instructors and students alike and will become a standard reference source. Essential for general and academic collections." --CHOICE This Encyclopedia provides readers with authoritative essays on virtually all social science methods topics, quantitative and qualitative, by an international collection of experts. Organized alphabetically, the Encyclopedia of Social Science Research Methods covers research terms ranging from different methodological approaches to epistemological issues and specific statistical techniques. Written to be accessible to general readers, the Encyclopedia entries do not require advanced knowledge of mathematics or statistics to understand the purposes or basic principles of any of the methods. To accomplish this goal, there are two major types of entries: definitions consisting of a paragraph or two to provide a quick explanation of a methodological term; and topical treatments or essays that discuss the nature, history, applications, and implications of using a certain method, including suggested readings and references. Readers are directed to related topics via cross-referenced terms that appear in small capital letters. By assembling entries of varied origins and serving different research purposes, readers will be able to benefit from this immense source of methodological expertise in advancing their understanding of research. With three volumes and more than 900 signed entries, the Encyclopedia of Social Science Research Methods will be a critical addition to any social science library.

The SAGE Sourcebook of Service-Learning and Civic Engagement

Author: Omobolade Delano-Oriaran

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 520

View: 222

Service-Learning and Civic Engagement: A Sourcebook focuses on historical, philosophical, social foundations, practices and models of service-learning and civic engagement. The title offers practical, jargon-free chapters applicable to any educational institution as well as community organizations that might consult the work. Key Features Practical, jargon-free chapters applicable to any educational institution as well as community organizations that might consult the work 58 signed chapters are organized into thematic parts, such as Concepts & Theoretical Approaches, Historical & Social Foundations, The Role of Service-Learning in Higher Education, The Role of the Community, Lessons Learned & Future Directions, etc. Thematic parts provide a practical sampling of syllabi, lesson plans, activities and resources, and online websites and databases supporting service-learning. Glossary (key terms commonly used in discussions and research on service-learning and civic engagement) Bibliography of sources consulted in production of the volume This Sourcebook is a scholarly source ideal for any educational institution and academic library as well as public libraries and community organizations that might consult the work on historical, philosophical social foundations, practices and models of service-learning and civic engagement.

Material Discourses of Health and Illness

Author: Lucy Yardley

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 256

View: 824

Material Discourses of Health and Illness applies discursive approaches to the field of health psychology, in stark contrast to the bio-medical model of health and illness. The discursive approach uses the person's experience and feelings as the central focus of interest, whereas the more traditional models regarded these as coincidental and relatively unimportant. The book provides an accessible and compelling introduction to social constructionist and discursive approaches to those with limited previous knowledge of socio-linguistic theory and research. It provides practical examples of how these approaches can be applied to the field of health psychology with a collection of sophisticated discursive analyses which demonstrate the distinctive contribution that can be made by psychologists to a field that has been largely dominated by sociologists and anthropologists.

The SAGE handbook of qualitative research in psychology

Author: Carla Willig

Publisher: Sage Publications Ltd

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 631

View: 120

The SAGE Handbook of Qualitative Research in Psychology provides comprehensive coverage of the qualitative methods, strategies and research issues in psychology, combining “how-to-do-it” summaries with an examination of historical and theoretical foundations. Examples from recent research are used to illustrate how each method has been applied, the data analyzed and insights gained. Chapters provide a “state of the art” review, take stock of what's been achieved so far and map trajectories for future developments. As such, the book will constitute a valuable resource for both experienced qualitative researchers and novices for many years to come. The Handbook is divided into three main sections: Part 1: Methods contains fourteen chapters on methodological approaches, ranging from established ones like Ethnography and Grounded Theory to more recent ones such as Memory Work. Part 2: Perspectives & Techniques includes chapters on Ethical Issues in Qualitative Research, key alternative standpoints such as Feminism, the use of computer technologies and the internet in qualitative research. Part 3: Applications reviews qualitative methods applied to13 sub-disciplines ranging from Cognitive to Post-colonial Psychology. Intended Audience This volume will be an excellent reference resource for advanced students, lecturers and researchers who have a wish or need to learn about trends and developments related to qualitative research in psychology.

The Stories We Are

An Essay on Self-Creation, Second Edition

Author: William Randall

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 440

View: 854

From time to time we all tend to wonder what sort of “story” our life might comprise: what it means, where it is going, and whether it hangs together as a whole. In The Stories We Are, William Lowell Randall explores the links between literature and life and speculates on the range of storytelling styles through which people compose their lives. In doing so, he draws on a variety of fields, including psychology, psychotherapy, theology, philosophy, feminist theory, and literary theory. Using categories like plot, character, point of view, and style, Randall plays with the possibility that we each make sense of the events of our lives to the extent that we weave them into our own unfolding novel, as simultaneously its author, narrator, main character, and reader. In the process, he offers us a unique perspective on features of our day-to-day world such as secrecy, self-deception, gossip, prejudice, intimacy, maturity, and the proverbial “art of living.” First published in 1995, this second edition of The Stories We Are includes a new preface and afterword by the author that offer insight into his argument and evolution as a scholar, as well as an illuminating foreword by Ruthellen Josselson.

Nursing Research Using Phenomenology

Qualitative Designs and Methods in Nursing

Author: Mary De Chesnay, PhD, RN, PMHCNS-BC, FAAN

Publisher: Springer Publishing Company

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 220

View: 980

"Phenomenology recognizes that...the work of a nurse is the work of an embodied subject, a feeling and knowing and experiencing person in relationship to another embodied subject, the patient, who is another feeling and knowing and experiencing person. Phenomenology in nursing will be concerned with the subjective, living person in her or his lived body in the experience of health and illnessóboth nurse and patient. As such, it could have radical effects." Jeffrey McCurry, Director, Simon Silverman Phenomenology Center Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (From the Foreword) Phenomenology is a descriptive approach to obtaining knowledge that focuses on capturing the essence of human experience through the point of view of a distinct individual. As a form of qualitative nursing research, it provides a perspective apart from that of empirical sciences, which see the human mind and body as physical or material objects open to study only through empirical science and treatable only through physical remedies. This "how-to" book describes the foundations of phenomenology and the specifics of how to conduct nursing research using phenomenological designs. It is part of an innovative series for novice researchers and specialists alike focusing on state-of-the-art methodologies from a nursing perspective. Authored by international scholars of qualitative nursing research, the book elucidates the theoretical rationale for using phenomenology, describes its components, and delineates a plan to conduct studies that includes appropriate methods, ethical considerations, and potential pitfalls. The book provides guidance for writing a research proposal that justifies the importance or potential impact of a study and describes how to conduct interviews that best elicit information. It focuses on achieving rigor in phenomenological research in regard to accuracy and replicability, and discusses different types of data collection and analysis and when to use them. Appendices include a list of qualitative research journals, textbooks, and other resources for more in-depth study. Chapters provide helpful advice on interviewing and data analysis. The book will be of value to novice and experienced nurse researchers, graduate teachers and students, in-service educators and students, and nursing research staff at health care institutions. Key Features: Comprises the first "how-to" guide to conducting qualitative phenomenological research from a nursing perspective Presents a comprehensive plan for conducting studies and appropriate measures, ethical considerations, and potential challenges Guides readers in construction of a research proposal that justifies the importance or potential impact of a study Provides examples of interviews that best elicit information

The Psychology of Personhood

Philosophical, Historical, Social-Developmental, and Narrative Perspectives

Author: Jack Martin

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page:

View: 412

What is a person? Surprisingly little attention is given to this question in psychology. For much of the past century, psychology has tended to focus on the systematic study of processes rather than on the persons who enact and embody them. In contrast to the reductionist picture of much mainstream theorising, which construes persons as their mental lives, behaviours or neurophysiological particulars, The Psychology of Personhood presents persons as irreducibly embodied and socially situated beings. Placing the study of persons at the centre of psychology, this book presents novel insights on the typical, everyday actions and experiences of persons in relation to each other and to the broader society and culture. Leading scholars from diverse academic disciplines paint an integrative portrait of the psychological person within evolutionary, historical, cultural, developmental and everyday contexts.