A Scotch Paisano in Old Los Angeles

Hugo Reid's Life in California, 1832-1852 Derived from His Correspondence

Author: Susanna Bryant Dakin

Publisher: University of California Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 334

View: 806

This title is part of UC Press's Voices Revived program, which commemorates University of California Press’s mission to seek out and cultivate the brightest minds and give them voice, reach, and impact. Drawing on a backlist dating to 1893, Voices Revived makes high-quality, peer-reviewed scholarship accessible once again using print-on-demand technology. This title was originally published in 1939.

A Scotch Paisano in Old Los Angeles

Hugo Reid's Life in California, 1832-1852 Derived from His Correspondence

Author: Susanna Bryant Dakin

Publisher: University of California Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 334

View: 537

This title is part of UC Press's Voices Revived program, which commemorates University of California Press’s mission to seek out and cultivate the brightest minds and give them voice, reach, and impact. Drawing on a backlist dating to 1893, Voices Revived makes high-quality, peer-reviewed scholarship accessible once again using print-on-demand technology. This title was originally published in 1939.

Historic Pasadena

An Illustrated History

Author: Ann Scheid Lund

Publisher: HPN Books

ISBN:

Category: Industries

Page: 214

View: 969

El Cinco de Mayo

An American Tradition

Author: David Hayes-Bautista

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 832

Why is Cinco de Mayo—a holiday commemorating a Mexican victory over the French at Puebla in 1862—so widely celebrated in California and across the United States, when it is scarcely observed in Mexico? As David E. Hayes-Bautista explains, the holiday is not Mexican at all, but rather an American one, created by Latinos in California during the mid-nineteenth century. Hayes-Bautista shows how the meaning of Cinco de Mayo has shifted over time—it embodied immigrant nostalgia in the 1930s, U.S. patriotism during World War II, Chicano Power in the 1960s and 1970s, and commercial intentions in the 1980s and 1990s. Today, it continues to reflect the aspirations of a community that is engaged, empowered, and expanding.

Encyclopedia of Immigration and Migration in the American West

Author: Gordon Morris Bakken

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 944

View: 547

The Encyclopedia of Immigration and Migration in the American West provides much more than ethnic groups crossing the plains, landing at ports, or crossing borders; this two-volume work makes the history of the American West an important part of the American experience. Through sweeping entries, focused biographies, community histories, economic enterprise analysis, and demographic studies, this Encyclopedia presents the tapestry of the West and its population during various periods of migration. The two volumes examine the settling of the West and include coverage of movements of American Indians, African Americans, and the often-forgotten role of women in the West's development.

The American West

The Reader

Author: Walter T. K. Nugent

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 335

View: 613

The American West has generated exceptional attention in the past few years, and new scholarship and interpretations have enriched and enlivened the study of its history. Each of the seventeen exciting and provocative essays chosen for this book illuminates an important topic in Western history. Three opening essays by the editors define the West as frontier and region, and place American frontiers in comparative context. Then follow essays that consider women's property rights in Spanish-Mexican California; the mountain men and national identity; Indians and bison on the Great Plains in the early nineteenth century; the Mexican-American War of 1846-1848; the Latter-day Saints from 1830 to 1890; the Sand Creek Massacre of 1864 as a case of Indian-white conflict; cowboys as wage workers in the 1880s; homesteading and the homesteading ideal; miners and ethnic conflict in early-twentieth-century Arizona; the Great Depression in Idaho; how World War II changed Los Angeles; Japanese-American women in World War II; African Americans in the West; and the Pacific Northwest since 1945. The editors also provide a general introduction to the study of Western history and a time line of important events.

Tam Blake & Co

Author: Jim Hewitson

Publisher: OTCEditions

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 310

View: 249

In 1540 Tam Blake, mercenary and adventurer, became the first recorded Scot in the New World. Since then, American-Scots have played an important part in all areas of American history, even among the Indian nations. This volume highlights the special qualities and heritage they have imparted to the world's most-powerful nation.

A History of Wine in America, Volume 1

From the Beginnings to Prohibition

Author: Thomas Pinney

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 572

View: 173

The Vikings called North America "Vinland," the land of wine. Giovanni de Verrazzano, the Italian explorer who first described the grapes of the New World, was sure that "they would yield excellent wines." And when the English settlers found grapes growing so thickly that they covered the ground down to the very seashore, they concluded that "in all the world the like abundance is not to be found." Thus, from the very beginning the promise of America was, in part, the alluring promise of wine. How that promise was repeatedly baffled, how its realization was gradually begun, and how at last it has been triumphantly fulfilled is the story told in this book. It is a story that touches on nearly every section of the United States and includes the whole range of American society from the founders to the latest immigrants. Germans in Pennsylvania, Swiss in Georgia, Minorcans in Florida, Italians in Arkansas, French in Kansas, Chinese in California—all contributed to the domestication of Bacchus in the New World. So too did innumerable individuals, institutions, and organizations. Prominent politicians, obscure farmers, eager amateurs, sober scientists: these and all the other kinds and conditions of American men and women figure in the story. The history of wine in America is, in many ways, the history of American origins and of American enterprise in microcosm. While much of that history has been lost to sight, especially after Prohibition, the recovery of the record has been the goal of many investigators over the years, and the results are here brought together for the first time. In print in its entirety for the first time, A History of Wine in America is the most comprehensive account of winemaking in the United States, from the Norse discovery of native grapes in 1001 A.D., through Prohibition, and up to the present expansion of winemaking in every state.

Sacred Sites

The Secret History of Southern California

Author: Susan Suntree

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 647

A history that is equal parts science and mythology, Sacred Sites offers a rare and poetic vision of a world composed of dynamic natural forces and mythic characters. The result is a singular and memorable account of the evolution of the Southern California landscape, reflecting the riches of both Native knowledge and Western scientific thought. Beginning with Western science, poet Susan Suntree carries readers from the Big Bang to the present as she describes the origins of the universe, the shifting of tectonic plates, and an evolving array of plants and animals that give Southern California its unique features today. She tells of the migration of humans into the region, where they settled, and how they lived. Complementing this narrative and reflecting Native peoples' view of their own history and way of life, Suntree recounts the creation myths and songs that tell the story of the First People and of unforgettable shamans and heroes. Featuring contemporary photographs of rarely seen landmarks along with meticulous research, Sacred Sites provides unusual insight into how natural history and mythology and scientific and intuitive thinking combine to create an ever-deepening sense of a place and its people.

A Coalition of Lineages

The Fernandeño Tataviam Band of Mission Indians

Author: Duane Champagne

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 403

View: 411

The experience of the Fernandeño Tataviam Band of Mission Indians is an instructive model for scholars and provides a model for multicultural tribal development that may be of interest to recognized and nonrecognized Indian nations in the United States and elsewhere.

Colonial Intimacies

Interethnic Kinship, Sexuality, and Marriage in Southern California, 1769–1885

Author: Erika Perez

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 408

View: 414

“A gem of historical scholarship!”—Vicki L. Ruiz, author of From Out of the Shadows: Mexican Women in Twentieth-Century America How do intimate relationships reveal, reflect, enable, or enact the social and political dimensions of imperial projects? In particular, how did colonial relations in late-eighteenth- and nineteenth-century southern California implicate sexuality, marriage, and kinship ties? In Colonial Intimacies, Erika Pérez probes everyday relationships, encounters, and interactions to show how intimate choices about marriage, social networks, and godparentage were embedded in larger geopolitical concerns. Her work reveals, through the lens of social and familial intimacy, subtle tools of conquest and acts of resistance and accommodation among indigenous peoples, Spanish-Mexican settlers, Franciscan missionaries, and European and Anglo-American merchants. Concentrating on Catholic conversion, compadrazgo (baptismal sponsorship that often forged interethnic relations), and intermarriage, Pérez examines the ways indigenous and Spanish-Mexican women helped shape communities and sustained their culture. She uncovers an unexpected fluidity in Californian society—shaped by race, class, gender, religion, and kinship—that persisted through the colony’s transition from Spanish to American rule. Colonial Intimacies focuses on the offspring of interethnic couples and their strategies for coping with colonial rule and negotiating racial and cultural identities. Pérez argues that these sons and daughters experienced conquest in different ways tied directly to their gender, and in turn faced different options in terms of marriage partners, economic status, social networks, and expressions of biculturality. Offering a more nuanced understanding of the colonial experience, Colonial Intimacies exposes the personal ties that undergirded imperial relationships in Spanish, Mexican, and early American California.

White People, Indians, and Highlanders

Tribal Peoples and Colonial Encounters in Scotland and America

Author: Colin G. Calloway

Publisher: OUP USA

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 855

A comparative approach to the American Indians and Scottish Highlanders, this book examines the experiences of clans and tribal societies, which underwent parallel experiences on the peripheries of Britain's empire in Britain, the United States, and Canada.

Tangible Memories

Californians and Their Gardens 1800-1950

Author: Harry M. Butte

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 475

View: 184

California may be the golden state but it is also a garden state. Innumerable gardens have been made since the Europeans first came, starting with the Franciscan missionaries.The gold rush was the defining period, leading to immense expenditures by newly rich miners. This book discusses many simple but beautiful gardens created by waves of immigrants. Gardens were necessary for food but also represented repose and leisure. The nature and style of domestic and private gardens shape the landscape of cities and towns just as much as large civic architectural achievements.

Contested Eden

California Before the Gold Rush

Author: Ramón A. Gutiérrez

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 395

View: 693

Celebrating the 150th birthday of the state of California offers the opportunity to reexamine the founding of modern California, from the earliest days through the Gold Rush and up to 1870. In this four-volume series, published in association with the California Historical Society, leading scholars offer a contemporary perspective on such issues as the evolution of a distinctive California culture, the interaction between people and the natural environment, the ways in which California's development affected the United States and the world, and the legacy of cultural and ethnic diversity in the state. California before the Gold Rush, the first California Sesquicentennial volume, combines topics of interest to scholars and general readers alike. The essays investigate traditional historical subjects and also explore such areas as environmental science, women's history, and Indian history. Authored by distinguished scholars in their respective fields, each essay contains excellent summary bibliographies of leading works on pertinent topics. This volume also features an extraordinary full-color photographic essay on the artistic record of the conquest of California by Europeans, as well as over seventy black-and-white photographs, some never before published.

The Gendered West

The American West

Author: Gordon Morris Bakken

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 996

First Published in 2001. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Negotiating Conquest

Gender and Power in California, 1770s to 1880s

Author: Miroslava Ch‡vez-Garc’a

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 850

"This study examines the ways in which Mexican and Native women challenged the patriarchal traditional culture of the Spanish, Mexican , and early American eras in California, tracing the shifting contingencies surrounding their lives from the imposition of Spanish Catholic colonial rule in the 1770s to the ascendancy of Euro-American Protestant capitalistic society in the 1880s." -from the book cover.

Borderman

Memoirs of Federico Jose Maria Ronstadt

Author: Federico Jose Maria Ronstadt

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 154

View: 160

Born in Sonora in 1868 to a Mexican mother and a German father, Federico Ronstadt was the quintessential borderman. He came to Arizona Territory as a young man to learn a trade and eventually became an American citizen; but with many relatives on both sides of the border, Federico was equally at home in Mexico and in his adopted country. Writing proudly of his Mexican and American heritages, Ronstadt offers readers an extraordinary portrait of the Arizona-Mexico borderlands during the late nineteenth century. His memoirs provide a richness of detail and insight unmatched by traditional histories, relating such scenarios as the hardships of Yaqui hardrock miners working under primitive conditions, the travails of pearl divers in the Gulf of California, and the insurrection of Francisco Serna in 1875 Sonora. They also depict the simple activities of childhood, with its schooling and musical training, its games and mischief. Ronstadt relates his apprenticeship to a wagon- and carriage-maker in Tucson, recalling labor relations in the shop, the establishment of his own business, and the joys and anguish of his personal life. He tells of how he drew on talents nurtured in childhood to become a musician and bandleader, playing weekly concerts with Club Filarm—nica Tucsonense for nine yearsÑmusical talents that were eventually passed on to his children, his grandchildren (including Linda), and great-grandchildren. Through Ronstadt's memories, we are better able to understand the sense of independence and self-reliance found today among many lifelong residents of Sonora and Baja CaliforniaÑpeople isolated from major supply sources and centers of powerÑand to appreciate a different view of Tucson's past. Enhanced by 22 historical photos, Borderman is a treasure trove of historical source material that will enlighten all readers interested in borderlands history.

Los Angeles County Historical Directory

Author: Janet Irene Atkinson

Publisher: McFarland & Company Incorporated Pub

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 207

View: 713

Provides brief information about the history of nearly one hundred California communities, and lists local museums and historic sites

Old Spanish Trail

Author: Leroy R. Hafen

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 375

View: 868

This classic history is filled with colorful pathmarkers like Jedediah Smith, John C. Främont, and Kit Carson; with packers, home seekers, and mail couriers; and with horse thieves and enslavers of Indian women and children.