A Research Agenda for Geographic Information Science

Author: Robert B. McMaster

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN:

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 416

View: 802

A close relationship exists between GIS and numerous applications, including cartography, photogrammetry, geodesy, surveying, computer and information science, and statistics, among others. Scientists coined the term "geographic information science (GIScience)" to describe the theory behind these fields. A Research Agenda for Geographic Information

A Research Agenda for Geographic Information Science

Author: Robert B. McMaster

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN:

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 416

View: 438

A close relationship exists between GIS and numerous applications, including cartography, photogrammetry, geodesy, surveying, computer and information science, and statistics, among others. Scientists coined the term "geographic information science (GIScience)" to describe the theory behind these fields. A Research Agenda for Geographic Information

A Research Agenda for Geographic Information Science at the United States Geological Survey

Author: National Research Council

Publisher: National Academies Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 156

View: 595

Comprehensive and authoritative baseline geospatial data content is crucial to the nation and to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The USGS founded its Center of Excellence for Geospatial Information Science (CEGIS) in 2006 to develop and distribute national geospatial data assets in a fast-moving information technology environment. In order to fulfill this mission, the USGS asked the National Research Council to assess current GIScience capabilities at the USGS, identify current and future needs for GIScience capabilities, recommend strategies for strengthening these capabilities and for collaborating with others to maximize research productivity, and make recommendations regarding the most effective research areas for CEGIS to pursue. With an initial focus on improving the capabilities of The National Map, the report recommends three priority research areas for CEGIS: information access and dissemination, data integration, and data models, and further identifies research topics within these areas that CEGIS should pursue. To address these research topics, CEGIS needs a sustainable research management process that involves a portfolio of collaborative research that balances short and long term goals.

Encyclopedia of Geographic Information Science

Author: Karen Kemp

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 558

View: 338

The Encyclopedia of Geographic Information Science covers the essence of this exciting, new, and expanding field in an easily understood but richly detailed style. In addition to contributions from some of the best recognized scholars in GIScience, this volume contains contributions from experts in GIS’ supporting disciplines who explore how their disciplinary perspectives are expanded within the context of GIScience—what changes when consideration of location is added, what complexities in analytical procedures are added when we consider objects in 2, 3 or even 4 dimensions, what can we gain by visualizing our analytical results on a map or 3D display?

Comprehensive Geographic Information Systems

Author:

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 1474

View: 594

Geographical Information Systems is a computer system used to capture, store, analyze and display information related to positions on the Earth’s surface. It has the ability to show multiple types of information on multiple geographical locations in a single map, enabling users to assess patterns and relationships between different information points, a crucial component for multiple aspects of modern life and industry. This 3-volumes reference provides an up-to date account of this growing discipline through in-depth reviews authored by leading experts in the field. VOLUME EDITORS Thomas J. Cova The University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, United States Ming-Hsiang Tsou San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, United States Georg Bareth University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany Chunqiao Song University of California, Los Angeles, CA, United States Yan Song University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, United States Kai Cao National University of Singapore, Singapore Elisabete A. Silva University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom Covers a rapidly expanding discipline, providing readers with a detailed overview of all aspects of geographic information systems, principles and applications Emphasizes the practical, socioeconomic applications of GIS Provides readers with a reliable, one-stop comprehensive guide, saving them time in searching for the information they need from different sources

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for Disaster Management

Author: Brian Tomaszewski

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 454

View: 420

Now in its second edition, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for Disaster Management has been completely updated to take account of new developments in the field. Using a hands-on approach grounded in relevant GIS and disaster management theory and practice, this textbook continues the tradition of the benchmark first edition, providing coverage of GIS fundamentals applied to disaster management. Real-life case studies demonstrate GIS concepts and their applicability to the full disaster management cycle. The learning-by-example approach helps readers see how GIS for disaster management operates at local, state, national, and international scales through government, the private sector, non‐governmental organizations, and volunteer groups. New in the second edition: a chapter on allied technologies that includes remote sensing, Global Positioning Systems (GPS), indoor navigation, and Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS); thirteen new technical exercises that supplement theoretical and practical chapter discussions and fully reinforce concepts learned; enhanced boxed text and other pedagogical features to give readers even more practical advice; examination of new forms of world‐wide disaster faced by society; discussion of new commercial and open-source GIS technology and techniques such as machine learning and the Internet of Things; new interviews with subject-matter and industry experts on GIS for disaster management in the US and abroad; new career advice on getting a first job in the industry. Learned yet accessible, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for Disaster Management continues to be a valuable teaching tool for undergraduate and graduate instructors in the disaster management and GIS fields, as well as disaster management and humanitarian professionals. Please visit http://gisfordisastermanagement.com to view supplemental material such as slides and hands-on exercise video walkthroughs. This companion website offers valuable hands-on experience applying concepts to practice.

Geographic Information Systems and Science

Author: Paul A. Longley

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 517

View: 376

Features a five part structure covering: Foundations; Principles; Techniques; Analysis; and Management and Policy. This book includes chapters on Distributed GIS, Map Production, Geovisualization, Modeling, and Managing GIS. It offers coverage of such topics as: GIS and the New World Order; security, health and well being; and the greening of GIS.

Beyond Mapping

Meeting National Needs Through Enhanced Geographic Information Science

Author: National Research Council

Publisher: National Academies Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 116

View: 926

Geographic information systems (GIS), the Global Positioning System (GPS), remote sensing, and other information technologies have all changed the nature of work in the mapping sciences and in the professions, industries, and institutions that depend on them for basic research and education. Today, geographic information systems have become central to the ways thousands of government agencies, private companies, and not-for-profit organizations do business. However, the supply of GIS/GIScience professionals has not kept pace with the demand generated by growing needs for more and improved geographic information systems and for more robust geographic data. Beyond Mapping assesses the state of mapping sciences at the beginning of the twenty-first century and identifies the critical national needs for GIS/GIScience professionals. It examines the forces that drive and accompany the need for GIS/GIScience professionals, including technological change, demand for geographic information, and changes in organizations. It assesses education and research needs, including essential training and education, new curriculum challenges and responses, quality assurance in education and training, and organizational challenges. Some of the report's recommendations include more collaboration among academic disciplines, private companies, and government agencies; the implementation of GIS/GIScience at all levels of education; and the development of a coherent, comprehensive research agenda for the mapping sciences.

Computation and Visualization for Understanding Dynamics in Geographic Domains

A Research Agenda

Author: May Yuan

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN:

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 120

View: 609

The world is ever changing, and a comprehensive understanding of the world will not be achieved without theoretical and methodological advances to decode complex dynamics in human and environmental systems. Computation and Visualization for the Understanding of Dynamics in Geographic Domains: A Research Agenda synthesizes key ideas and issues discussed during the UCGIS hosted workshop on computation. It expands upon popular discussions to provide a comprehensive overview of geographic dynamics and new approaches to advance our understanding of geographic dynamics through computation and visualization. The text gives an overview of the state of research and how this research relates to intelligence analysis. It addresses broad issues and challenges in areas, such as spatiotemporal analysis and modeling, spatiotemporal visual analytics; spatiotemporal data mining, spatiotemporal reasoning, and spatiotemporal ontologies. The book also fuses suggestions from workshop participants with literature reviews to propose new research agendas and recommendations for future developments and collaboration. With full coverage on current developments and probably challenges, Computation and Visualization for the Understanding of Dynamics in Geographic Domains: A Research Agenda establishes a foundation to promote further studies in geographic dynamics and provides a springboard for the next big scientific and technological breakthrough.