A Place of Execution

A Novel

Author: Val McDermid

Publisher: Minotaur Books

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 416

View: 690

Winter 1963: two children have disappeared off the streets of Manchester; the murderous careers of Myra Hindley and Ian Brady have begun. On a freezing day in December, another child goes missing: thirteen-year-old Alison Carter vanishes from her town, an insular community that distrusts the outside world. For the young George Bennett, a newly promoted inspector, it is the beginning of his most difficult and harrowing case: a murder with no body, an investigation with more dead ends and closed faces than he'd have found in the anonymity of the inner city, and an outcome which reverberates through the years. Decades later he finally tells his story to journalist Catherine Heathcote, but just when the book is poised for publication, Bennett unaccountably tries to pull the plug. He has new information which he refuses to divulge, new information that threatens the very foundations of his existence. Catherine is forced to re-investigate the past, with results that turn the world upside down. A Greek tragedy in modern England, Val McDermid's A Place of Execution is a taut psychological thriller that explores, exposes and explodes the border between reality and illusion in a multi-layered narrative that turns expectations on their head and reminds us that what we know is what we do not know. A Place of Execution is winner of the 2000 Los Angeles Times Book Prize and a 2001 Edgar Award Nominee for Best Novel.

A Place in the Story

Servants and Service in Shakespeare's Plays

Author: Linda Anderson

Publisher: University of Delaware Press

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 339

View: 829

This book explores the virtues Shakespeare made of the cultural necessities of servants and service. Although all of Shakespeare's plays feature servants as characters, and many of these characters play prominent roles, surprisingly little attention has been paid to them or to the concept of service. A Place in the Story is the first book-length overview of the uses Shakespeare makes of servant-characters and the early modern concept of service. Service was not only a fact of life in Shakespeare's era, but also a complex ideology. The book discusses service both as an ideal and an insult, examines how servants function in the plays, and explores the language of service. Other topics include loyalty, advice, messengers, conflict, disobedience, and violence. Servants were an intrinsic part of early modern life and Shakespeare found servant-characters and the concept of service useful in many different ways. Linda Anderson teaches at Virginia Polytechnic University.

Achieving Extraordinary Ends: An Essay on Creativity

Author: S. Bailin

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 142

View: 724

CREATIVITY HAS become a popular slogan in contemporary education and society. We are urged continually to be creative with respect to all our endeavours - to be creative writers, creative cooks, creative teachers, creative thinkers, creative lovers. Ascribing creativity has become one of the principal means of praising, approving, and commending. Yet in the process of becoming a universal term of positive evaluation, the concept of creativity has tended to lose its connection with its origins. We have forgotten that creativity has to do with creating, that it is connected with great achievements and quality productions. And as a consequence of this lapse of memory, most attempts to foster creativity in educational practice have been misleading at best and dangerous at worst. We have come to settle for the encouragement of certain personality traits at the expense of the encouragement of significant achievement - and this in the name of creativity. If we are not clear about what is meant by creativity, we may end up sacrificing creativity precisely in the process of trying to foster it. This book is an attempt to be clear about creativity. The Context For the poet is an airy thing, a winged and a holy thing; and he cannot make poetry until he becomes inspired and goes out of his senses and no mind is left in him. l Plato If creativity and its growth are to be viewed scientifically, creativity must be defined in a way that permits objective observation and measurement . . .