A Natural History of Human Emotions

Author: Stuart Walton

Publisher: Grove/Atlantic, Inc.

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 432

View: 946

Using Charles Darwin’s survey of emotions as a starting point, Stuart Walton’s A Natural History of Human Emotions examines the history of each of our core emotions—fear, anger, disgust, sadness, jealousy, contempt, shame, embarrassment, surprise, and happiness—and how these emotions have influenced both cultural and social history. We learn that primitive fear served as the engine of religious belief, while a desire for happiness led to humankind’s first musings on achieving a perfect utopia. Challenging the notion that human emotion has remained constant, A Natural History of Human Emotions explains why, in the last 250 years, society has changed its unwritten rules for what can be expressed in public and in private. Like An Intimate History of Humanity and Near a Thousand Tables, Walton’s A Natural History of Human Emotions is a provocative examination of human feelings and a fascinating take on how emotions have shaped our past.

Exam Prep for: A Natural History of Human Emotions

Author: David Mason

Publisher: Rico Publications

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 800

View: 202

5,600 Exam Prep questions and answers. Ebooks, Textbooks, Courses, Books Simplified as questions and answers by Rico Publications. Very effective study tools especially when you only have a limited amount of time. They work with your textbook or without a textbook and can help you to review and learn essential terms, people, places, events, and key concepts.

A Natural History of Human Emotions

Author: Stuart Walton

Publisher: Grove Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 410

View: 326

The author of Out of It: A Cultural History of Intoxication tackles human emotion, exploring the ten basic human emotions that shape personality and identity, blending insights from philosophy, science, history, and popular culture.

The History of Emotions

An Introduction

Author: Jan Plamper

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 670

The history of emotions is one of the fastest growing fields in current historical debate, and this is the first book-length introduction to the field, synthesizing the current research, and offering direction for future study. The History of Emotions is organized around the debate between social constructivist and universalist theories of emotion that has shaped most emotions research in a variety of disciplines for more than a hundred years: social constructivists believe that emotions are largely learned and subject to historical change, while universalists insist on the timelessness and pan-culturalism of emotions. In historicizing and problematizing this binary, Jan Plamper opens emotions research beyond constructivism and universalism; he also maps a vast terrain of thought about feelings in anthropology, philosophy, sociology, linguistics, art history, political science, the life sciences—from nineteenth-century experimental psychology to the latest affective neuroscience—and history, from ancient times to the present day.

Darwin, His Daughter, and Human Evolution

Author: Randal Keynes

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 448

View: 424

In a chest of drawers bequeathed by his grandmother, author Randal Keynes discovered the writing case of Charles and Emma Darwin’s beloved daughter Annie Darwin, who died at the age of ten. He also found the notes Darwin kept throughout Annie's illness, the eulogy he delivered at her funeral—and provocative new insights into Darwin’s views on nature, evolution, and the human condition. In Darwin, His Daughter & Human Evolution, Keynes shows that Darwin was not "a cold intellect with no place for love in his famous 'struggle for existence,' [but]...a man of uncommon warmth" (Scientific American). Creation: The True Story of Charles Darwin is now a major motion picture and the movie tie-in paperback is also available from Riverhead Books.

Emotion, Evolution, and Rationality

Author: Dylan Evans

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 273

View: 807

Do our emotions stop us being rational? For thousands of years, emotions have been thought of as obstacles to intelligent thought. In this book, leading thinkers from philosophy, psychology and neuroscience challenge this commonly held view of emotion in a series of challenging essays.

Skin

A Natural History

Author: Nina G. Jablonski

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 266

View: 617

The rich cultural canvas of the skin is placed within its broader biological context in a complete guidebook to the pliable covering that makes humans who they are.

A History of Women Philosophers

Medieval, Renaissance and Enlightenment Women Philosophers A.D. 500–1600

Author: M.E. Waithe

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 349

View: 307

aspirations, the rise of western monasticism was the most note worthy event of the early centuries. The importance of monasteries cannot be overstressed as sources of spirituality, learning and auto nomy in the intensely masculinized, militarized feudal period. Drawing their members from the highest levels of society, women's monasteries provided an outlet for the energy and ambition of strong-willed women, as well as positions of considerable authority. Even from periods relatively inhospitable to learning of all kinds, the memory has been preserved of a good number of women of education. Their often considerable achievements and influence, however, generally lie outside even an expanded definition of philo sophy. Among the most notable foremothers of this early period were several whose efforts signal the possibility of later philosophical work. Radegund, in the sixth century, established one of the first Frankish convents, thereby laying the foundations for women's spiritual and intellectual development. From these beginnings, women's monasteries increased rapidly in both number and in fluence both on the continent and in Anglo-Saxon England. Hilda (d. 680) is well known as the powerful abbsess of the double monastery of Whitby. She was eager for knowledge, and five Eng lish bishops were educated under her tutelage. She is also accounted the patron of Caedmon, the first Anglo-Saxon poet of religious verse. The Anglo-Saxon nun Lioba was versed in the liberal arts as well as Scripture and canon law.

The Role of Emotions in Social and Personality Development

History, Theory and Research

Author: Carol Magai

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 358

View: 567

This up-to-date summary of research in the field highlights the pivotal role that emotions play in personality formation and social behavior. The authors discuss this research in its historical context, placing current developments within the broader framework of the field's own research history, and that of developmental psychology in general. They treat developmental topics from both the classic age-comparative and normative-descriptive approaches, as well as from an individual differences perspective.

Inventing Human Science

Eighteenth-Century Domains

Author: Christopher Fox, Mbc

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 357

View: 257

The human sciences—including psychology, anthropology, and social theory—are widely held to have been born during the eighteenth century. This first full-length, English-language study of the Enlightenment sciences of humans explores the sources, context, and effects of this major intellectual development. The book argues that the most fundamental inspiration for the Enlightenment was the scientific revolution of the seventeenth century. Natural philosophers from Copernicus to Newton had created a magisterial science of nature based on the realization that the physical world operated according to orderly, discoverable laws. Eighteenth-century thinkers sought to cap this achievement with a science of human nature. Belief in the existence of laws governing human will and emotion; social change; and politics, economics, and medicine suffused the writings of such disparate figures as Hume, Kant, and Adam Smith and formed the basis of the new sciences. A work of remarkable cross-disciplinary scholarship, this volume illuminates the origins of the human sciences and offers a new view of the Enlightenment that highlights the period's subtle social theory, awareness of ambiguity, and sympathy for historical and cultural difference.