A Madman's Diary

English and Chinese Bilingual Edition

Author: Lu Xun

Publisher: CreateSpace

ISBN:

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 64

View: 861

This English and Chinese bilingual edition of a "A Madman's Diary" was first published in 1918 by Lu Xun, one of the greatest writers in 20th-century Chinese literature. This short story is one of the first and most influential modern works written in vernacular Chinese and would become a cornerstone of the New Culture Movement. The story was often referred to as "China's first modern short story". This book is selected as one of The 100 Best Books of All Time. The diary form was inspired by Nikolai Gogol's short story "Diary of a Madman, " as was the idea of the madman who sees reality more clearly than those around him. The "madman" sees "cannibalism" both in his family and the village around him, and he then finds cannibalism in the Confucian classics which had long been credited with a humanistic concern for the mutual obligations of society, and thus for the superiority of Confucian civilization. The story was read as an ironic attack on traditional Chinese culture and a call for a New Culture.

The Madman's Diary

Author: Thom Racina

Publisher: Signet

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 430

View: 525

Palms Springs interior designer Judy Sussman becomes the target of a deranged and obsessed admirer who continually stalks her to eliminate anyone with whom she becomes involved. Original.

The Chinese Postmodern

Trauma and Irony in Chinese Avant-garde Fiction

Author: Xiaobin Yang

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 286

View: 642

An insightful look into contemporary Chinese avant-garde fiction and the problem of Chinese postmodernity

Diary of a Madman and Other Stories

Author: Xun Lu

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 389

View: 916

Xun (or Hsun) is the master (inventor?) of the modern Chinese short story. Some of his stories were translated into American English in 1941, but more recent translations have been into a British English. Lyell provides an introduction, notes on pronunciation and further notes on the text, intending to win as wide an audience as possible beyond those already familiar with Chinese history and culture. Annotation(c) 2003 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Diary of a Madman and Other Stories

Author: Lu Xun

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page:

View: 659

Diary of a Madman and Other Stories by Lu Xun. Lu Xun (1881–1936), a leading figure of modern Chinese literature. Writing in Vernacular Chinese as well as Classical Chinese, Lu Xun was a novelist, editor, translator, literary critic, essayist, and poet. In the 1930s he became the titular head of the League of Left-Wing Writers in Shanghai. The Complete Short Stories of Lu Xun where included in these edition: A Madman's Diary; Kung I-chi; Medicine; Tomorrow; An Incident; Storm in a Teacup; My Old Home; The True Story of Ah Q; Village Opera; The New Year's Sacrifice; In the Wine Shop; A Happy Family; Soap; The Misanthrope; Regret for the Past; The Divorce; The Flight to the Moon; Forging the Swords. Two brothers, whose names I need not mention here, were both good friends of mine in high school; but after a separation of many years we gradually lost touch. Some time ago I happened to hear that one of them was seriously ill, and since I was going back to my old home I broke my journey to call on them, I saw only one, however, who told me that the invalid was his younger brother. "I appreciate your coming such a long way to see us," he said, "but my brother recovered some time ago and has gone elsewhere to take up an official post." Then, laughing, he produced two volumes of his brother's diary, saying that from these the nature of his past illness could be seen, and that there was no harm in showing them to an old friend. I took the diary away, read it through, and found that he had suffered from a form of persecution complex. The writing was most confused and incoherent, and he had made many wild statements; moreover he had omitted to give any dates, so that only by the colour of the ink and the differences in the writing could one tell that it was not written at one time. Certain sections, however, were not altogether disconnected, and I have copied out a part to serve as a subject for medical research. I have not altered a single illogicality in the diary and have changed only the names, even though the people referred to are all country folk, unknown to the world and of no consequence. As for the title, it was chosen by the diarist himself after his recovery, and I did not change it.

Postmodernism and China

Author: Arif Dirlik

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 969

Few countries have been so transformed in recent decades as China. With a dynamically growing economy and a rapidly changing social structure, China challenges the West to understand the nature of its modernization. Using postmodernism as both a global frame of periodization and a way to break free from the rigid ideology of westernization as modernity, this volume’s diverse group of contributors argues that the Chinese experience is crucial for understanding postmodernism. Collectively, these essays question the implications of specific phenomena, like literature, architecture, rock music, and film, in a postsocialist society. Some essays address China’s complicity in—as well as its resistance to—the culture of global capitalism. Others evaluate the impact of efforts to redefine national culture in terms of enhanced freedoms and expressions of the imagination in everyday life. Still others discuss the general relaxation of political society in post-Mao China, the emergence of the market and its consumer mass culture, and the fashion and discourse of nostalgia. The contributors make a clear case for both the historical uniqueness of Chinese postmodernism and the need to understand its specificity in order to fully grasp the condition of postmodernity worldwide. Although the focus is on mainland China, the volume also includes important observations on social and cultural realities in Hong Kong and Taiwan, whose postmodernity has so far been confined—in both Chinese and English-speaking worlds—to their economic and consumer activities instead of their political and cultural dynamism. First published as a special issue of boundary 2, Postmodernism and China includes seven new essays. By juxtaposing postmodernism with postsocialism and by analyzing China as a producer and not merely a consumer of the culture of the postmodern, it will contribute to critical discourses on globalism, modernity, and political economics, as well as to cultural and Asian studies. Contributors. Evans Chan, Arif Dirlik, Dai Jinhua, Liu Kang, Anthony D. King, Jeroen de Kloet, Abidin Kusno, Wendy Larson, Chaoyang Liao, Ping-hui Liao, Sebastian Hsien-hao Liao, Sheldon Hsiao-peng Lu, Wang Ning, Xiaobing Tang, Xiaoying Wang, Chen Xiaoming, Xiaobin Yang, Zhang Yiwu, Xudong Zhang

The Columbia Anthology of Modern Chinese Literature

Author: Joseph S. M. Lau

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 737

View: 626

With a generous selection of new translations commissioned for this book, readers will find the best short fiction, poetry, and essays from mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong in this first comprehensive collection of twentieth-century Chinese literature, which includes a lucid introduction by the editors and short biographies of the writers and poets.

Style and Narrative in Translations

The Contribution of Futabatei Shimei

Author: Hiroko Cockerill

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 282

View: 330

Futabatei Shimei (1864-1909) is widely regarded as the founder of the modern Japanese novel. His novel Floating Clouds (1887-1889) was written in a colloquial narrative style that was unprecedented in Japanese literature, as was its negative hero. Futabatei was also a pioneer translator of Russian literature, translating works by Turgenev, Gogol, Tolstoy, Gorky and others - his translations had an enormous impact (perhaps even greater than his novels) on the development of Japanese literature. In this groundbreaking work, Hiroko Cockerill analyses the development of Futabatei's translation style and the influence of his work as a translator on his own writing. She takes us on a journey through Russian and Japanese literature, throwing light on the development of Japanese literary language, particularly in its use of verb forms to convey notions of tense and aspect that were embedded in European languages. Cockerill finds that Futabatei developed not one, but two distinctive styles, based on the influences of Turgenev and Gogol. While the influence of his translations from Turgenev was immediate and far-reaching, his more Gogolian translations are fascinating in their own right, and contemporary translators would do well to revisit them.