A History of Irish Theatre 1601-2000

Author: Christopher Morash

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 322

View: 519

Chris Morash's widely-praised account of Irish Theatre traces an often forgotten history leading up to the Irish Literary Revival. He then follows that history to the present by creating a remarkably clear picture of the cultural contexts which produced the playwrights who have been responsible for making Irish theatre's world-wide historical and contemporary reputation. The main chapters are each followed by shorter chapters, focusing on a single night at the theatre. This prize-winning book is an essential, entertaining and highly original guide to the history and performance of Irish theatre.

Mapping Irish Theatre

Theories of Space and Place

Author: Chris Morash

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 225

View: 732

Morash and Richards present an original approach to understanding how theatre has produced distinctively Irish senses of space and place.

The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish Theatre

Author: Nicholas Grene

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 688

View: 795

The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish Theatre provides the single most comprehensive survey of the field to be found in a single volume. Drawing on more than forty contributors from around the world, the book addresses a full range of topics relating to modern Irish theatre from the late nineteenth-century theatre to the most recent works of postdramatic devised theatre. Ireland has long had an importance in the world of theatre out of all proportion to the size of the country, and has been home to four Nobel Laureates (Yeats, Shaw, and Beckett; Seamus Heaney, while primarily a poet, also wrote for the stage). This collection begins with the influence of melodrama, looks at arguably the first modern Irish playwright, Oscar Wilde, before moving into a series of considerations of the Abbey Theatre, and Irish modernism. Arranged chronologically, it explores areas such as women in theatre, Irish-language theatre, and alternative theatres, before reaching the major writers of more recent Irish theatre, including Brian Friel and Tom Murphy, and their successors. There are also individual chapters focusing on Beckett and Shaw, as well as a series of chapters looking at design, acting and theatre architecture. The book concludes with an extended survey of the critical literature on the field. In each chapter, the author does not simply rehearse accepted wisdom; all of the authors push the boundaries of their respective fields, so that each chapter is a significant contribution to scholarship in its own right.

Joyce, O'Casey, and the Irish Popular Theater

Author: Adjunct Professor of Theatre and Drama Stephen Watt

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 277

View: 275

This study explores Ireland's late 19th-century popular theater and its impact on the works of two of its major writers, James Joyce and Sean O'Casey. Employing the strategies of Marxist cultural analysis and the seldom-discussed aspect of Irish popular culture and assesses its contribution to various political and social discourses in turn-of- the-century Dublin. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

The Palgrave Handbook of Contemporary Irish Theatre and Performance

Author: Eamonn Jordan

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 866

View: 931

This Handbook offers a multiform sweep of theoretical, historical, practical and personal glimpses into a landscape roughly characterised as contemporary Irish theatre and performance. Bringing together a spectrum of voices and sensibilities in each of its four sections — Histories, Close-ups, Interfaces, and Reflections — it casts its gaze back across the past sixty years or so to recall, analyse, and assess the recent legacy of theatre and performance on this island. While offering information, overviews and reflections of current thought across its chapters, this book will serve most handily as food for thought and a springboard for curiosity. Offering something different in its mix of themes and perspectives, so that previously unexamined surfaces might come to light individually and in conjunction with other essays, it is a wide-ranging and indispensable resource in Irish theatre studies.

Border States in the Work of Tom Mac Intyre

A Paleo-Postmodern Perspective

Author: Catriona Ryan

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 270

View: 951

This work analyses the prose and drama of the Irish writer Tom Mac Intyre and the concept of paleo-postmodernism. It examines how Mac Intyre balances traditional themes with experimentation, which in the Irish literary canon is unusual. This book argues that Mac Intyre’s position in the Irish literary canon is an idiosyncratic one in that he combines two contrary aspects of Irish literature: between what Beckett terms as the Yeatsian ‘antiquarians’ who valorize the ‘Victorian Gael’ and the ‘others’ whose aesthetic involves a European-influenced ‘breakdown of the object’ which is associated with Beckett. Mac Intyre’s experimentation involves a breakdown of the object in order to uncover an unconscious Irish mythological and linguistic space in language. His approach to language experimentation is Yeatsian and this is what the author terms as paleo-postmodern. Thus the project considers how Mac Intyre incorporates Yeatsian revivalism with postmodern deconstruction in his drama and short stories.

Performing the Body in Irish Theatre

Author: B. Sweeney

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 241

View: 917

This title examines the representation of the body in Irish theatre alongside the specific circumstances within which Irish theatre is performed, incorporating issues of gender and embodiment, and the performance of Irishness and tradition. The author contextualizes the body in Irish theatre, and includes in-depth analysis of five key productions.

J. M. Synge

Nature, Politics, Modernism

Author: Seán Hewitt

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 256

View: 104

A thorough re-assessment of one of Ireland's major playwrights, J.M. Synge (1871-1909). Using much previously-undiscussed archival material, the book takes each of Synge's plays and prose works, tracing his journey from an early Romanticism to a later, more combative modernism.

Banned in Ireland

Censorship and the Irish Writer

Author: Julia Carlson

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Censorship

Page: 176

View: 177

TDR.

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page:

View: 877

Hegemony and Fantasy in Irish Drama, 1899-1949

Author: Paul Murphy

Publisher: Palgrave MacMillan

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 266

View: 123

Hegemony and Fantasy in Irish Drama, 1899-1949 offers a theoretically innovative reconsideration of drama produced in the Irish Renaissance, as well as an engagement with non-canonical drama in the under-researched period 1926-1949.

Contemporary Irish Drama

Author: Anthony Roche

Publisher: Palgrave MacMillan

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 292

View: 594

This new edition of Anthony Roche's pioneering survey of twentieth-century Irish drama brings the story up to date with new material on the contemporary Irish theatre scene.

The Wexford Trilogy

Author: Billy Roche

Publisher: Dramatists Play Service Inc

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 180

View: 644

THE STORIES: A HANDFUL OF STARS. Set in a local dilapidated snooker hall, A HANDFUL OF STARS tells the story of Jimmy Brady, a young Wexford tearaway who refuses to abide by the rules and regulations that are applied in this so-called man's world,

Theatre and Globalization

Irish Drama in the Celtic Tiger Era

Author: Patrick Lonergan

Publisher: Palgrave MacMillan

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 175

WINNER OF THE 2008 THEATRE BOOK PRIZE! Globalization is transforming theatre everywhere. As writers seek to exploit new opportunities to produce their work internationally, audiences are seeing the world – and the stage – differently. And, as national borders became more fluid, the barriers between economics and culture are also becoming weaker. In this groundbreaking study, Patrick Lonergan explores these developments, placing them in the context of the transformation of Ireland – the ‘most globalized country in the world’ – since the early 1990s. Drawing on archival material that has never before been published, this study sheds new light on the culture of Celtic Tiger Ireland, focusing on such writers as Brian Friel, Sean O’Casey, Marie Jones, Martin McDonagh, Marina Carr and Conor McPherson. In doing so, it shows how globalization poses difficult questions for authors and audiences – and reveals how we can begin to come to terms with these new developments.

Making Theatre in Northern Ireland

Through and Beyond the Troubles

Author: Tom Maguire

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 221

View: 822

This book examines the relationships between theatre and the turbulent political and social context of Northern Ireland since 1969. It explores key theatrical performances which deal directly with this context. The book is aimed at a student readership: it is largely play-text-based, and it contains useful contextualising material.

Dissident Dramaturgies

Contemporary Irish Theatre

Author: Eamonn Jordan

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 277

View: 777

From Boston to Berlin, and from Belfast to Beijing, the performances of Irish plays have been greeted with critical and box-office acclaim. Plays by Marina Carr, Brian Friel, Marie Jones, Martin McDonagh, Frank McGuinness, Tom Murphy, Mark O'Rowe, Conor McPherson, and Enda Walsh have toured extensively, and have been translated and adapted for new performance contexts. This book examines the dominant approaches and the recurrent and variable dramaturgical patterns in the writings of the contemporary generation of writers from 1980 to the present. Six very specific, dominant configurations or constructions that shape the blatant dramaturgy of Irish Theatre are considered in individual chapters that focus the relationships between history, memory, and metatheatre, how the notion of innocence is contested, the various deployments of a range of myths by contemporary playwrights, the consequences of perverting pastoral consciousness, and the implications and repercussions of storytelling to a tradition of writing. In all of the work produced both locally and abroad, Ireland, and a coerced and admired notion of 'Irishness' function, in part as a commodity but also as something uniquely defiant, liberating, and dissident in itself.

History of the Theatre

Author: Oscar Gross Brockett

Publisher: Pearson College Division

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 688

View: 751

Known as the "bible" of theatre history, Brockett and Hildy's History of the Theatre is the most comprehensive and widely used survey of theatre history in the market. This 40th Anniversary Edition retains all of the traditional features that have made History of the Theatre the most successful text of its kind, including worldwide coverage, more than 530 photos and illustrations, useful maps, and the expertise of Oscar G. Brockett and Franklin J. Hildy, two of the most widely respected theatre historians in the field. As with every edition, the text reflects the current state of knowledge and brings the history of theatre up to the present. This tenth edition continues to provide the most thorough and accurate assessment of theatre history available.

Theatre History Studies 2014, Vol. 33

Theatres of War

Author: Elizabeth Reitz Mullenix

Publisher: University Alabama Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 320

View: 579

Volume 33 of Theatre History Studies explores war. War is a paradox—horrifying and compelling, galvanizing and devastating, a phenomenon that separates and decimates while at the same time creating and strengthening national identity and community bonds. War is the stuff of great drama. War and theatre is a subject of increasing popularity among scholars of theatre. The essays in this special edition of Theatre History Studies brings together a unique collection of work by thirteen innovative scholars whose work explores such topics as theatre performances during war times, theatre written and performed to resist war, and theatre that fosters and promotes war. The contributors to this volume write poignantly about nationhood and about how war—through both propaganda and protest—defines a people. The contributors also delve into numerous fascinating themes that transcend time, peoples, nations, and particular conflicts: the foundations of nationalism and the concepts of occupied and occupier, nostalgia and utopia, and patriotism and revolution. These essays survey a march of civil and international wars spanning three centuries. Arranged chronologically, they invite comparisons between themes and trace the development of the major themes of war. Ideas manifest in the theatre of one period recall ideologies and propaganda of the past, reflect those of the present, and anticipate wars to come.