A History of American Literary Journalism

The Emergence of a Modern Narrative Form

Author: John C. Hartsock

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 294

View: 581

This study examines the roots of the distinctive form of writing known as journalism - whether called literary journalism or creative non-fiction - and argues that within America it can be traced at least as far back as the late-19th century.

Literary Journalism in the Twentieth Century

Author: Norman Sims

Publisher: Northwestern University Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 297

View: 646

This wide-ranging collection of critical essays on literary journalism addresses the shifting border between fiction and non-fiction, literature and journalism. Literary Journalism in the Twentieth Century addresses general and historical issues, explores questions of authorial intent and the status of the territory between literature and journalism, and offers a case study of Mary McCarthy’s 1953 piece, "Artists in Uniform," a classic of literary journalism. Sims offers a thought-provoking study of the nature of perception and the truth, as well as issues facing journalism today.

Settling the Borderland

Other Voices in Literary Journalism

Author: Jan Whitt

Publisher: University Press of America

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 178

View: 671

Settling the Borderland deals with the intimate connection between journalism and literature, both fields in which work by women has been underrepresented. This book has a twin focus: the work of journalists who became some of the greatest novelists, poets, and short-story writers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in America, several of whom are men, and contemporary journalists who best exemplify the effective use of literary techniques in news coverage. Although five women are emphasized here (Katherine Anne Porter, Eudora Welty, Joan Didion, Sara Davidson, and Susan Orlean), three men whose work was profoundly influenced by journalism also are included. Edgar Allan Poe, Walt Whitman, and John Steinbeck are well known as writers of poetry, short stories, and novels, but they, too, are among the "other voices" rarely included in studies of literary journalism. In Settling the Borderland, Jan Whitt presents a thorough analysis of the increasingly indistinct lines between truth and fiction and between fact and creative narrative in contemporary media.

Pauline Elizabeth Hopkins

Black Daughter of the Revolution

Author: Lois Brown

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 690

View: 505

Born into an educated free black family in Portland, Maine, Pauline Elizabeth Hopkins (1859-1930) was a pioneering playwright, journalist, novelist, feminist, and public intellectual, best known for her 1900 novel Contending Forces: A Romance of Negro

Out on Assignment

Newspaper Women and the Making of Modern Public Space

Author: Alice Fahs

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 360

View: 424

Out on Assignment illuminates the lives and writings of a lost world of women who wrote for major metropolitan newspapers at the start of the twentieth century. Using extraordinary archival research, Alice Fahs unearths a richly networked community

Intermediality and Storytelling

Author: Marina Grishakova

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 359

View: 848

The ‘narrative turn’ in the humanities, which expanded the study of narrative to various disciplines, has found a correlate in the ‘medial turn’ in narratology. Long restricted to language-based literary fiction, narratology has found new life in the recognition that storytelling can take place in a variety of media, and often combines signs belonging to different semiotic categories: visual, auditory, linguistic and perhaps even tactile. The essays gathered in this volume apply the newly gained awareness of the expressive power of media to particular texts, demonstrating the productivity of a medium-aware analysis. Through the examination of a wide variety of different media, ranging from widely studied, such as literature and film, to new, neglected, or non-standard ones, such as graphic novels, photography, television, musicals, computer games and advertising, they address some of the most fundamental questions raised by the medial turn in narratology: how can narrative meaning be created in media other than language; how do different types of signs collaborate with each other in so-called ‘multi-modal works’, and what new forms of narrativity are made possible by the emergence of digital media.

The Undeclared War between Journalism and Fiction

Journalists as Genre Benders in Literary History

Author: D. Underwood

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 250

View: 661

In this volume, Doug Underwood asks whether much of what is now called literary journalism is, in fact, 'literary,' and whether it should rank with the great novels by such journalist-literary figures as Twain, Cather, and Hemingway, who believed that fiction was the better place for a realistic writer to express the important truths of life.

Literary Journalism and the Aesthetics of Experience

Author: John C. Hartsock

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 224

View: 468

Proponents and practitioners of narrative literary journalism have sought to assert its distinctiveness as both a literary form and a type of journalism. In Literary Journalism and the Aesthetics of Experience, John C. Hartsock argues that this often neglected kind of journalism--exemplified by such renowned works as John Hersey's Hiroshima, James Agee's Let Us Now Praise Famous Men, and Joan Didion's Slouching Towards Bethlehem--has emerged as an important genre of its own, not just a hybrid of the techniques of fiction and the conventions of traditional journalism. Hartsock situates narrative literary journalism within the broader histories of the American tradition of "objective" journalism and the standard novel. While all embrace the value of narrative, or storytelling, literary journalism offers a particular "aesthetics of experience" lacking in both the others. Not only does literary journalism disrupt the myths sustained by conventional journalism and the novel, but its rich details and attention to everyday life question readers' cultural assumptions. Drawing on the critical theories of Nietzsche, Bakhtin, Benjamin, and others, Hartsock argues that the aesthetics of experience challenge the shibboleths that often obscure the realities the other two forms seek to convey. At a time when print media appear in decline, Hartsock offers a thoughtful response to those who ask, "What place if any is there for a narrative literary journalism in a rapidly changing media world?"

Latin American Adventures in Literary Journalism

Author: Pablo Calvi

Publisher: Pitt Illuminations

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 526

Latin American Adventures in Literary Journalism explores the central role of narrative journalism in the formation of national identities in Latin America, and the concomitant role the genre had in the consolidation of the idea of Latin America as a supra-national entity. This work discusses the impact that the form had in the creation of an original Latin American literature during six historical moments. Beginning in the 1840s and ending in the 1970s, Calvi connects the evolution of literary journalism with the consolidation of Latin America's literary sphere, the professional practice of journalism, the development of the modern mass media, and the establishment of nation-states in the region.