A Geography of Victorian Gothic Fiction

Mapping History's Nightmares

Author: Robert Mighall

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 312

View: 465

This is the first major full-length study of Victorian Gothic fiction. Combining original readings of familiar texts with a rich store of historical sources, A Geography of Victorian Gothic Fiction is an historicist survey of nineteenth-century Gothic writing--from Dickens to Stoker, Wilkie Collins to Conan Doyle, through European travelogues, sexological textbooks, ecclesiastic histories and pamphlets on the perils of self-abuse. Critics have thus far tended to concentrate on specific angles of Gothic writing (gender or race), or the belief that the Gothic 'returned' at the so-called fin de si�cle. Robert Mighall, by contrast, demonstrates how the Gothic mode was active throughout the Victorian period, and provides historical explanations for its development from late eighteenth century, through the 'Urban Gothic' fictions of the mid-Victorian period, the 'Suburban Gothic' of the Sensation vogue, through to the somatic horrors of Stevenson, Machen, Stoker, and Doyle at the century's close. Mighall challenges the psychological approach to Gothic fiction which currently prevails, demonstrating the importance of geographical, historical, and discursive factors that have been largely neglected by critics, and employing a variety of original sources to demonstrate the contexts of Gothic fiction and explain its development in the Victorian period.

The Victorian Novel

Author: Francis O'Gorman

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 368

View: 351

This guide steers students through significant critical responses to the Victorian novel from the end of the nineteenth century to the present day.

Degeneration, Normativity and the Gothic at the Fin de Siècle

Author: S. Karschay

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 304

View: 421

This exciting new study looks at degeneration and deviance in nineteenth-century science and late-Victorian Gothic fiction. The questions it raises are as relevant today as they were at the nineteenth century's fin de siecle: What constitutes the norm from which a deviation has occurred? What exactly does it mean to be 'normal' or 'abnormal'?

The Late Victorian Gothic

Mental Science, the Uncanny, and Scenes of Writing

Author: Hilary Grimes

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 196

View: 677

Examining the automatic writing of the spiritualist séances, discursive technologies like the telegraph and the photograph, various genres and late nineteenth-century mental science, this book shows the failure of writers' attempts to use technology as a way of translating the supernatural at the fin de siècle. Hilary Grimes shows that both new technology and explorations into the ghostly aspects of the mind made agency problematic. When notions of agency are suspended, Grimes argues, authorship itself becomes uncanny. Grimes's study is distinct in both recognizing and crossing strict boundaries to suggest that Gothic literature itself resists categorization, not only between literary periods, but also between genres. Treating a wide range of authors - Henry James, Rudyard Kipling, Arthur Conan Doyle, George Du Maurier, Vernon Lee, Mary Louisa Molesworth, Sarah Grand, and George Paston - Grimes shows how fin-de-siècle works negotiate themes associated with the Victorian and Modernist periods such as psychical research, mass marketing, and new technologies. With particular attention to texts that are not placed within the Gothic genre, but which nevertheless conceal Gothic themes, The Late Victorian Gothic demonstrates that the end of the nineteenth century produced a Gothicism specific to the period.

Late Victorian Gothic Tales

Author: Roger Luckhurst

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 282

View: 110

'He was a man of fairly firm fibre, but there was something in this sudden, uncontrollable shriek of horror which chilled his blood and pringled in his skin. Coming in such a place and at such an hour, it brought a thousand fantastic possibilities into his head...' The Victorian fin de siècle: the era of Decadence, The Yellow Book, the New Woman, the scandalous Oscar Wilde, the Empire on which the sun never set. This heady brew was caught nowhere better than in the revival of the Gothic tale in the late Victorian age, where the undead walked and evil curses, foul murder, doomed inheritance and sexual menace played on the stretched nerves of the new mass readerships. This anthology collects together some of the most famous examples of the Gothic tale in the 1890s, with stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, Vernon Lee, Henry James and Arthur Machen, as well as some lesser known yet superbly chilling tales from the era. The introduction explores the many reasons for the Gothic revival, and how it spoke to the anxieties of the moment. ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.

In Darkest London

The Gothic Cityscape in Victorian Literature

Author: Jamieson Ridenhour

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 157

View: 811

In the late 1830s, London began appearing as a site of literary terror, and by the end of the century a large proportion of the important Victorian “Gothic revival” novels were set in the city. In Darkest London is a full-length study of the Victorian Urban Gothic, a pervasive mode that appears not only in straightforward novels of terror but also in the works of mainstream authors. Placing the conventions of the Gothic form in their proper historical context, In Darkest London will appeal to scholars and students interested in an in-depth survey of the Urban Gothic.

Victorian Gothic

An Edinburgh Companion

Author: Andrew Smith

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 272

View: 954

The first multi-disciplinary scholarly consideration of the Victorian Gothic These 14 chapters, each written by an acknowledged expert in the field, provide an invaluable insight into the complex and various Gothic forms of the nineteenth century. Covering a range of diverse contexts, the chapters focus on science, medicine, Queer theory, imperialism, nationalism, and gender. Together with further chapters on the ghost story, realism, the fin de sic e, pulp fictions, sensation fiction, and the Victorian way of death, the Companion provides the most complete overview of the Victorian Gothic to date.The book is an essential resource for students and scholars working on the Gothic, Victorian literature and culture, and critical theory.Key Features*First multi-authored thorough exploration of the Victorian Gothic*Original research in all chapters*Sets the agenda for future scholarship in the field*Pedagogically awareKey WordsVictorian, Gothic, Science, Gender, Nationalism, Death, Supernatural, Ghost, Death

American Gothic Fiction

An Introduction

Author: Allan Lloyd-Smith

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 197

View: 640

Following the structure of other titles in the Continuum Introductions to Literary Genres series, American Gothic Fiction includes: A broad definition of the genre and its essential elements. A timeline of developments within the genre. Critical concerns to bear in mind while reading in the genre. Detailed readings of a range of widely taught texts. In-depth analysis of major themes and issues. Signposts for further study within the genre. A summary of the most important criticism in the field. A glossary of terms. An annotated, critical reading list. This book offers students, writers, and serious fans a window into some of the most popular topics, styles and periods in this subject. Authors studied in American Gothic Fiction include Charles Brockden Brown, William Montgomery Bird, James Fenimore Cooper, Edgar Allan Poe, George Lippard, Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne, William Gilmore Simms, John Neal, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Ambrose Bierce, Emma Dawson, W.D. Howells, Henry James, William Faulkner, Anne Rice and William Gibson>

Victorian Gothic: An Edinburgh Companion

An Edinburgh Companion

Author: Andrew Smith

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 272

View: 503

A multi-disciplinary scholarly consideration of the Victorian Gothic These 14 chapters, each written by an acknowledged expert in the field, provide an invaluable insight into the complex and various Gothic forms of the nineteenth century. Covering a range of diverse contexts, the chapters focus on science, medicine, Queer theory, imperialism, nationalism, and gender. Together with further chapters on the ghost story, realism, the fin de siecle, pulp fictions, sensation fiction, and the Victorian way of death, the Companion provides a thorough-going overview of the Victorian Gothic. An essential resource for students and scholars working on the Gothic, Victorian literature and culture, and critical theory. Key Features * First multi-authored thorough exploration of the Victorian Gothic * Original research in all chapters * Sets the agenda for future scholarship in the field * Pedagogically awareKey WordsVictorian, Gothic, Science, Gender, Nationalism, Death, Supernatural, Ghost, Death

Sunshine

One Man's Search for Happiness

Author: Robert Mighall

Publisher: John Murray Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Sunshine

Page: 277

View: 632

Robert Mighall is hopelessly addicted to sunshine. He climbs ladders to catch the last rays of the descending sun and takes regular sun breaks during the working day, joining the smokers outside for his own furtive fix. An obsessive, yes, but he is only an extreme example of our national type. Sunshine explores this obsession. It explains how sunshine became a symbol of health, hope and freedom in the early 20th century, and why we have much to thank the nudists for. It explores why sunshine gives us pleasure, the rites and rituals of modern sun-worship, and how this love affair finds expression in the books we read, the films we watch, and the songs we hear every day. Witty, romantic and absurdly obsessive, Sunshine illuminates something everybody loves, yet nobody has attempted to capture between two covers. It is also an open love letter to the most fickle mistress northern man ever served.

George Eliot and the Gothic Novel

Genres, Gender and Feeling

Author: Royce Mahawatte

Publisher: University of Wales Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 260

View: 539

George Eliot and the Gothic Novel is the first monograph to systematically explore George Eliot’s relationship to Gothic genres. It considers the ways in which the author’s ethics link to sensational story-telling tropes. Reappraising the major works of fiction, this study compares passages of Eliot’s writing with sequences from eighteenth and nineteenth-century Gothic works. Royce Mahawatte examines Eliot’s deployment of, for example, the incarcerated heroine in Middlemarch, doppelgangers in Romola and vampiric queerness in Daniel Deronda. In doing so he lifts Eliot from the boundaries of social realism and places her within a broader and richer Victorian literary scene than has been previously considered.

Degeneration, Normativity and the Gothic at the Fin de Siècle

Author: S. Karschay

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 304

View: 736

This exciting new study looks at degeneration and deviance in nineteenth-century science and late-Victorian Gothic fiction. The questions it raises are as relevant today as they were at the nineteenth century's fin de siecle: What constitutes the norm from which a deviation has occurred? What exactly does it mean to be 'normal' or 'abnormal'?

Women’s Colonial Gothic Writing, 1850-1930

Haunted Empire

Author: Melissa Edmundson

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 258

View: 344

This book explores women writers’ involvement with the Gothic. The author sheds new light on women’s experience, a viewpoint that remains largely absent from male-authored Colonial Gothic works. The book investigates how women writers appropriated the Gothic genre—and its emphasis on fear, isolation, troubled identity, racial otherness, and sexual deviancy—in order to take these anxieties into the farthest realms of the British Empire. The chapters show how Gothic themes told from a woman’s perspective emerge in unique ways when set in the different colonial regions that comprise the scope of this book: Canada, the Caribbean, Africa, India, Australia, and New Zealand. Edmundson argues that women’s Colonial Gothic writing tends to be more critical of imperialism, and thereby more subversive, than that of their male counterparts. This book will be of interest to students and academics interested in women’s writing, the Gothic, and colonial studies.

The Cambridge Companion to Gothic Fiction

Author: Jerrold E. Hogle

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 354

View: 975

Gothic as a form of fiction-making has played a major role in Western culture since the late eighteenth century. In this volume, fourteen world-class experts on the Gothic provide thorough and revealing accounts of this haunting-to-horrifying type of fiction from the 1760s (the decade of The Castle of Otranto, the first so-called 'Gothic story') to the end of the twentieth century (an era haunted by filmed and computerized Gothic simulations). Along the way, these essays explore the connections of Gothic fictions to political and industrial revolutions, the realistic novel, the theatre, Romantic and post-Romantic poetry, nationalism and racism from Europe to America, colonized and post-colonial populations, the rise of film and other visual technologies, the struggles between 'high' and 'popular' culture, changing psychological attitudes towards human identity, gender and sexuality, and the obscure lines between life and death, sanity and madness. The volume also includes a chronology and guides to further reading.

Gothic Evolutions

Poetry, Tales, Context, Theory

Author: Corinna Wagner

Publisher: Broadview Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 625

View: 381

The texts in this unique collection range from the Gothic Revival of the late eighteenth century through to the late Victorian gothic, and from the poetry of Wordsworth and Coleridge to the short fiction of H.G. Wells and Henry James. Genres represented include medievalist poetry, psychological thrillers, dark political dystopias, sinister tales of social corruption, and popular ghost tales. In addition to a wide selection of classic and lesser-known texts from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, Gothic Evolutions includes key examples of the aesthetic, scientific, and cultural theory related to the Gothic, from John Locke and David Hume to Sigmund Freud and Julia Kristeva.

The Gothic World

Author: Glennis Byron

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 538

View: 186

The Gothic World offers an overview of this popular field whilst also extending critical debate in exciting new directions such as film, politics, fashion, architecture, fine art and cyberculture. Structured around the principles of time, space and practice, and including a detailed general introduction, the five sections look at: Gothic Histories Gothic Spaces Gothic Readers and Writers Gothic Spectacle Contemporary Impulses. The Gothic World seeks to account for the Gothic as a multi-faceted, multi-dimensional force, as a style, an aesthetic experience and a mode of cultural expression that traverses genres, forms, media, disciplines and national boundaries and creates, indeed, its own ‘World’.

Keats

Author: Robert Mighall

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 160

View: 260

One of the leading figures of the English Romantic movement, and an inspiration for many future poets, John Keats' works such as "Ode to a Nightingale," "To Autumn," and "Ode on a Grecian Urn" are among the best-loved poems of all time. In this new biography, Robert Mighall charts the life of this brilliant poet, from the premature deaths of both his parents, to his early writings and unkind treatment from critics, his travels and friendship with the Shelleys, and his untimely death at the age of 25. Interspersed in his life story are extracts from Keats’s poems to offer a unique insight into both the man and his work.

Gothic Writing, 1750-1820

A Genealogy

Author: Robert Miles

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 244

View: 743

An intriguing overview of Gothic literature

A Research Guide to Gothic Literature in English

Print and Electronic Sources

Author: Sherri L. Brown

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 252

View: 596

The Gothic began as a designation for barbarian tribes, was associated with the cathedrals of the High Middle Ages, was used to describe a marginalized literature in the late eighteenth century, and continues today in a variety of forms (literature, film, graphic novel, video games, and other narrative and artistic forms). Unlike other recent books in the field that focus on certain aspects of the Gothic, this work directs researchers to seminal and significant resources on all of its aspects. Annotations will help researchers determine what materials best suit their needs. A Research Guide to Gothic Literature in English covers Gothic cultural artifacts such as literature, film, graphic novels, and videogames. This authoritative guide equips researchers with valuable recent information about noteworthy resources that they can use to study the Gothic effectively and thoroughly.

Italian Politics and Nineteenth-Century British Literature and Culture

Author: Cove Patricia Cove

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN:

Category: Electronic books

Page: 200

View: 704

A transnational approach to Risorgimento culture's contentious and exhilarating nation-building enterpriseKey FeaturesRe-imagines the parameters and duration of the relationship between the Risorgimento and British culture to revitalise critical engagement with the political dimension of nineteenth-century Anglo-Italian studiesMaps the emergence and evolution of major nineteenth-century forms and genres according to the reverberations of Italian politics that shaped the literary landscapeCovers a wide range of diverse sources, including fiction, poetry and polemical and journalistic non-fiction prose, adding to an existing critical debate focused on poetryRethinks nineteenth-century British political debates surrounding liberalism, the nation and the rights of citizens and refugees in light of the seismic geopolitical shift of Italian unificationCrossing borders, political divides and genres, this book examines the intersections among literary works by Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Mary Shelley and Wilkie Collins, journalism, parliamentary records and pamphlets, to establish Britain's imaginative investment in the seismic geopolitical realignment of Italian unification.Revitalising critical narratives surrounding the mutually constitutive Anglo-Italian relationship, Cove argues that forging a new state demands both making and unmaking; as the Risorgimento re-mapped Europe's geopolitical reality, it also reframed how the British saw themselves, their politics and their place within Europe.