A Daybook for May in Yellow Springs, Ohio

A Memoir in Nature

Author: Bill Felker

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 248

View: 961

This fifth volume of A DAYBOOK FOR THE YEAR IN YELLOW SPRINGS, OHIO, is memoir, extended meditation and guidebook to the month of May in southwestern Ohio - as well as in the Middle Atlantic region and much of the East and Southeast. The principal habitat described here is that of Glen Helen, a preserve of woods and glades that forms the eastern border of the village of Yellow Springs in southwestern Ohio. The passages from ancient and modern writers ( which accompany each day's notations are lessons from my readings, as well as from distant seminary and university training, here put to work in service of the reconstruction of my sense of time and space. They are a collection of reminders, hopes and promises for me that I find implicit in the seasons. They have also become a kind of a cosmological scrapbook for me, as well as the philosophical underpinning of this narrative. I have included the sunrise and sunset for Yellow Springs as a general guide to the progression of the year in this location, but those statistics also reflect trends that are world wide. Average temperatures in Yellow Springs are also part of each day's entry. Since the rise and fall of temperatures in other parts of the North America keep pace with the temperatures in Yellow Springs, the highs and lows, like solar statistics, are helpful indicators of the steady progress of the year everywhere. My daily, weekly and monthly weather summaries have been distilled from over thirty years of observations, and they offer a statistical description of each day. Although information about the Yellow Springs microclimate at first seemed too narrow to be of use to those who lived outside my area, I found that I could adjust my data to meet the needs of a number of regional and national farm publications for which I started writing in the mid 1980s. Soon I was finding that what had happened in Yellow Springs was applicable to many other parts of the country. The Natural Calendar sections of this DAYBOOK include approximate dates for astronomical events such as star movement, meteor showers, solstice, equinox, perihelion (the sun's position closest to earth) and aphelion (the sun's position farthest from earth). In this section also I note the progress of foliage and floral changes, farm and garden practices, migration times for common birds and peak periods of insect activity. At the beginning of this volume, I have included a floating calendar that lists average blooming dates for wildflowers that blossom between April and June in an average Yellow Springs season. Although the flora of the eastern and central United States is hardly limited to the species mentioned here, the flowers listed are common enough to provide easily recognized landmarks for gauging the advance of the year in most areas east of the Mississippi. The DAYBOOK journal itself consists of my notes on what I saw happening around me in Yellow Springs between 1979 and 2017. It is a collection of observations made in my yard, from the window of my car and from my walks in Glen Helen, in other parks and wildlife areas within a few miles of my home, and on occasional trips. The cumulative format of the DAYBOOK, which brings together all of the annual entries for the same day through the span of over thirty years, has shown me the regularity of the changes in the seasons, and it fleshes out a broad, multi-faceted picture of each segment of the year. This daily record and the natural calendar summaries, then, are records of moveable seasonal feasts that shift not only according to geographical regions but also according to the weather in any particular year. They are a phenological handbook and guidebook for the days. In addition, they can be used as an informal base line for monitoring future changes in local climate.

A Daybook for June in Yellow Springs, Ohio

A Memoir in Nature

Author: Bill Felker

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 228

View: 852

This sixth volume of A DAYBOOK FOR THE YEAR IN YELLOW SPRINGS, OHIO, is memoir, extended meditation and guidebook to the month of May in southwestern Ohio - as well as in the Middle Atlantic region and much of the East and Southeast. The principal habitat described here is that of Glen Helen, a preserve of woods and glades that forms the eastern border of the village of Yellow Springs in southwestern Ohio. The passages from ancient and modern writers ( which accompany each day's notations are lessons from my readings, as well as from distant seminary and university training, here put to work in service of the reconstruction of my sense of time and space. They are a collection of reminders, hopes and promises for me that I find implicit in the seasons. They have also become a kind of a cosmological scrapbook for me, as well as the philosophical underpinning of this narrative. I have included the sunrise and sunset for Yellow Springs as a general guide to the progression of the year in this location, but those statistics also reflect trends that are world wide. Average temperatures in Yellow Springs are also part of each day's entry. Since the rise and fall of temperatures in other parts of the North America keep pace with the temperatures in Yellow Springs, the highs and lows, like solar statistics, are helpful indicators of the steady progress of the year everywhere. My daily, weekly and monthly weather summaries have been distilled from over thirty years of observations, and they offer a statistical description of each day. Although information about the Yellow Springs microclimate at first seemed too narrow to be of use to those who lived outside my area, I found that I could adjust my data to meet the needs of a number of regional and national farm publications for which I started writing in the mid 1980s. Soon I was finding that what had happened in Yellow Springs was applicable to many other parts of the country. The Natural Calendar sections of this DAYBOOK include approximate dates for astronomical events such as star movement, meteor showers, solstice, equinox, perihelion (the sun's position closest to earth) and aphelion (the sun's position farthest from earth). In this section also I note the progress of foliage and floral changes, farm and garden practices, migration times for common birds and peak periods of insect activity. At the beginning of this volume, I have included a floating calendar that lists average blooming dates for wildflowers that blossom between April and June in an average Yellow Springs season. Although the flora of the eastern and central United States is hardly limited to the species mentioned here, the flowers listed are common enough to provide easily recognized landmarks for gauging the advance of the year in most areas east of the Mississippi. The DAYBOOK journal itself consists of my notes on what I saw happening around me in Yellow Springs between 1979 and 2017. It is a collection of observations made in my yard, from the window of my car and from my walks in Glen Helen, in other parks and wildlife areas within a few miles of my home, and on occasional trips. The cumulative format of the DAYBOOK, which brings together all of the annual entries for the same day through the span of over thirty years, has shown me the regularity of the changes in the seasons, and it fleshes out a broad, multi-faceted picture of each segment of the year. This daily record and the natural calendar summaries, then, are records of moveable seasonal feasts that shift not only according to geographical regions but also according to the weather in any particular year. They are a phenological handbook and guidebook for the days. In addition, they can be used as an informal base line for monitoring future changes in local climate.

A Daybook for March in Yellow Springs, Ohio

A Memoir in Nature

Author: Bill Felker

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 232

View: 415

The format of all my notes in this daybook owes more than a little to the almanacs I wrote and continue to write for the Yellow Springs News between 1984 and 2017. The quotations, daily statistics, the weather outlooks, the seasonal calendar and the daybook journal were and still are part of my regular routine of collecting and organizing impressions about the place in which I live. Setting: The principal habitat described here is that of Glen Helen, a preserve of woods and glades that forms the eastern border of the village of Yellow Springs in southwestern Ohio. Quotations: The passages from ancient and modern writers (and sometimes from my alter egos) which accompany each day's notations are lessons from my readings, as well as from distant seminary and university training, here put to work in service of the reconstruction of my sense of time and space. They are a collection of reminders, hopes, and promises for me that I find implicit in the seasons. They have also become a kind of a cosmological scrapbook for me, as well as the philosophical underpinning of this narrative. Astronomical Data: I have included the sunrise and sunset for Yellow Springs as a general guide to the progression of the year in this location, but those statistics also reflect trends that are world wide. Average Temperatures: Average temperatures in Yellow Springs are also part of each day's entry. Since the rise and fall of temperatures in other parts of the North America keep pace with the temperatures in Yellow Springs, the daybook's highs and lows, like solar statistics, are helpful indicators of the steady progress of the year everywhere. Weather: My daily, weekly and monthly weather summaries have been distilled from over thirty years of observations, and they offer a statistical description of each day. Although information about the Yellow Springs microclimate at first seemed too narrow to be of use to those who lived outside my area, I began to adjust my data to meet the needs of a number of regional and national farm publications for which I started writing in the mid 1980s. And so, while the weather summaries are based on my records in southwestern Ohio, they can be and have been used, with interpretation and interpolation, throughout the Lower Midwest, the Middle Atlantic states and the East. The Natural Calendar: This seasonal summary includes approximate dates for astronomical events such as star movement, meteor showers, solstice, equinox, perihelion (the sun's position closest to Earth) and aphelion (the sun's position farthest from Earth). In this section I note changes in foliage and floral, farm and garden practices, migration times for common birds and peak periods of insect activity. At the beginning of each spring and summer month, I have included a wildflower calendar that lists blooming dates for hundreds of wildflowers in an average Yellow Springs season. Although the flora of the eastern and central United States is hardly limited to the species mentioned here, the flowers listed are common enough to provide easily recognized landmarks for gauging the advance of the year in most areas east of the Mississippi. Daybook: The daybook journal consists of my notes on what I saw happening in nature around me in Yellow Springs between 1979 and 2017. It is a collection of observations made from the window of my car and from my walks in Glen Helen, in other parks and wildlife areas within a few miles of my home, and on occasional trips in the United States and abroad. The cumulative format of the daybook, which brings together all of the annual entries for the same day through the span of over thirty years, has shown me the regularity of the seasons, and it fleshes out a broad, multi faceted picture of each segment of the year. At the same time, this format provides an informal base line for monitoring future changes in local climate.

A Daybook for April in Yellow Springs, Ohio

A Memoir in Nature

Author: Bill Felker

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 258

View: 239

The format of all my notes in this daybook owes more than a little to the almanacs I wrote and continue to write for the Yellow Springs News between 1984 and 2017. The quotations, daily statistics, the weather outlooks, the seasonal calendar and the daybook journal were and still are part of my regular routine of collecting and organizing impressions about the place in which I live. Setting: The principal habitat described here is that of Glen Helen, a preserve of woods and glades that forms the eastern border of the village of Yellow Springs in southwestern Ohio. Quotations: The passages from ancient and modern writers (and sometimes from my alter egos) which accompany each day's notations are lessons from my readings, as well as from distant seminary and university training, put to work here in service of the reconstruction of my sense of time and space. They are a collection of reminders, hopes, and promises for me that I find implicit in the seasons. They have also become a kind of a cosmological scrapbook for me, as well as the philosophical underpinning of this narrative. Astronomical Data: I have included the sunrise and sunset for Yellow Springs as a general guide to the progression of the year in this location, but those statistics also reflect trends throughout the country. Average Temperatures: Average temperatures in Yellow Springs are also part of each day's entry. Since the rise and fall of temperatures in other parts of the North America keep pace with the temperatures in Yellow Springs, the daybook's highs and lows, like solar statistics, are helpful indicators of the steady progress of the year everywhere. Weather: My daily, weekly and monthly weather summaries have been distilled from over thirty years of observations, and they offer a statistical description of each day. Although information about the Yellow Springs microclimate at first seemed too narrow to be of use to those who lived outside my area, I adjusted my data to meet the needs of a number of regional and national farm publications for which I started writing in the mid 1980s. And so, while the weather summaries are based on my records in southwestern Ohio, they can be and have been used, with interpretation and interpolation, throughout the Lower Midwest, the Middle Atlantic states and the East. The Natural Calendar: My seasonal summaries includes approximate dates for astronomical events such as star movement, meteor showers, solstice, equinox, perihelion (the sun's position closest to Earth) and aphelion (the sun's position farthest from Earth). In this section I also note changes in foliage and floral, farm and garden practices, migration times for common birds and peak periods of insect activity. At the beginning of each spring and summer month, I have included a wildflower calendar that lists blooming dates for hundreds of wildflowers in an average Yellow Springs season. Although the flora of the eastern and central United States is hardly limited to the species mentioned here, the flowers listed are common enough to provide easily recognized landmarks for gauging the advance of the year in most areas east of the Mississippi. Daybook: The daybook journal consists of my notes on what I saw happening in nature around me in Yellow Springs between 1979 and 2017. It is a collection of observations made from my yard, from the window of my car, from my walks in Glen Helen and in other parks and wildlife areas near my home, and on occasional trips in the United States and abroad. The cumulative format of the daybook, which brings together all of the annual entries for the same day through the span of over thirty years, has shown me the regularity as well as the variability of the seasons, and it fleshes out a broad, multi faceted picture of each segment of the year. At the same time, this format provides an informal base line for monitoring future changes in regional climate.

A Daybook for September in Yellow Springs, Ohio

A Memoir in Nature

Author: Bill Felker

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 202

View: 849

This ninth volume of A DAYBOOK FOR THE YEAR IN YELLOW SPRINGS, OHIO, is a memoir, extended meditation and guidebook to the month of September in southwestern Ohio, as well as in the Middle Atlantic region and much of the East and Southeast. The DAYBOOK journal itself consists of my notes on what I saw happening around me in Yellow Springs between 1979 and 2017. It is a collection of observations made from the window of my car and from my walks in and around Yellow Springs, in parks and wildlife areas within a few miles of my home and on occasional trips throughout the United States and Europe. My daily, weekly and monthly weather summaries have been distilled from over thirty years of observations, and they offer a statistical description of each day. Although information about the Yellow Springs microclimate at first seemed too narrow to be of use to those who lived outside my area, I found that I could adjust my data to meet the needs of a number of regional and national farm publications for which I started writing in the mid 1980s. Soon I was finding that what had happened in Yellow Springs was applicable to many other parts of the country. In the Natural Calendar sections of the DAYBOOK I note the progress of foliage and floral changes, farm and garden practices, migration times for common birds and peak periods of insect activity. At the beginning of this volume, I have included a floating calendar that lists average blooming dates for wildflowers that blossom between August and September in an average southwestern Ohio season. Although the flora of the United States is hardly limited to the species mentioned here, the flowers listed are common enough to provide easily recognized landmarks for gauging the advance of the year in most areas east of the Mississippi. The cumulative format of the DAYBOOK, which brings together all of the annual entries for the same day through the span of over thirty years, has shown me the regularity of the changes in the seasons, and it fleshes out a broad, multi-faceted picture of each segment of the year. The daily record and the natural calendar summaries, then, are records of moveable seasonal feasts that shift not only according to geographical regions but also according to the weather in any particular year. They are a phenological handbook for the region and a time- exposure narrative of the month. In addition, they can be used as an informal base line for monitoring future changes in local climate. The passages from ancient and modern writers that accompany each day's notations are lessons from my readings, as well as from distant seminary and university training, here put to work in service of the reconstruction of my sense of time and space. They are a collection of reminders, hopes and promises for me that I find implicit in the seasons. They are a kind of a cosmological scrapbook for me and the philosophical underpinning of this narrative.

A Daybook for July in Yellow Springs, Ohio

A Memoir in Nature

Author: Bill Felker

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 228

View: 879

This seventh volume of A DAYBOOK FOR THE YEAR IN YELLOW SPRINGS, OHIO, is a memoir, extended meditation and guidebook to the month of July in southwestern Ohio, as well as in the Middle Atlantic region and much of the East and Southeast. My daily, weekly and monthly weather summaries have been distilled from over thirty years of observations, and they offer a statistical description of each day. Although information about the Yellow Springs microclimate at first seemed too narrow to be of use to those who lived outside my area, I found that I could adjust my data to meet the needs of a number of regional and national farm publications for which I started writing in the mid 1980s. Soon I was finding that what had happened in Yellow Springs was applicable to many other parts of the country. In the Natural Calendar sections of this DAYBOOK I note the progress of foliage and floral changes, farm and garden practices, migration times for common birds and peak periods of insect activity. At the beginning of this volume, I have included a floating calendar that lists average blooming dates for wildflowers that blossom between April and June in an average Yellow Springs season. Although the flora of the eastern and central United States is hardly limited to the species mentioned here, the flowers listed are common enough to provide easily recognized landmarks for gauging the advance of the year in most areas east of the Mississippi. The DAYBOOK journal itself consists of my notes on what I saw happening around me in Yellow Springs between 1979 and 2017. It is a collection of observations made from the window of my car and from my walks in Glen Helen, in other parks and wildlife areas within a few miles of my home, and on occasional trips. The cumulative format of the DAYBOOK, which brings together all of the annual entries for the same day through the span of over thirty years, has shown me the regularity of the changes in the seasons, and it fleshes out a broad, multi-faceted picture of each segment of the year. This daily record and the natural calendar summaries, then, are records of moveable seasonal feasts that shift not only according to geographical regions but also according to the weather in any particular year. They are a phenological handbook for the days. In addition, they can be used as an informal base line for monitoring future changes in local climate. The passages from ancient and modern writers which accompany each day's notations are lessons from my readings, as well as from distant seminary and university training, here put to work in service of the reconstruction of my sense of time and space. They are a collection of reminders, hopes and promises for me that I find implicit in the seasons. They have also become a kind of a cosmological scrapbook for me, as well as the philosophical underpinning of this narrative.

A Daybook for December in Yellow Springs, Ohio

A Memoir in Nature

Author: Bill Felker

Publisher: Daybook for the Year in Yellow

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 178

View: 719

This final volume of A DAYBOOK FOR THE YEAR IN YELLOW SPRINGS, OHIO, is a memoir, extended meditation and guidebook to the month of December in southwestern Ohio, as well as in the Middle Atlantic region and much of the East and Southeast. The DAYBOOK journal itself consists of my notes on what I saw happening around me in Yellow Springs between 1979 and 2017. It is a collection of observations made from the window of my car and from my walks in and around Yellow Springs, in parks and wildlife areas within a few miles of my home and on occasional trips throughout the United States and Europe.My daily, weekly and monthly weather summaries have been distilled from over thirty years of observations, and they offer a statistical description of each day. Although information about the Yellow Springs microclimate at first seemed too narrow to be of use to those who lived outside my area, I found that I could adjust my data to meet the needs of a number of regional and national farm publications for which I started writing in the mid 1980s. Soon I was finding that what had happened in Yellow Springs was applicable to many other parts of the country. In the Natural Calendar sections of the DAYBOOK I note the progress of foliage and floral changes, farm and garden practices, migration times for common birds and peak periods of insect activity. The cumulative format of the DAYBOOK, which brings together all of the annual entries for the same day through the span of over thirty years, has shown me the regularity of the changes in the seasons, and it fleshes out a broad, multi-faceted picture of each segment of the year. The daily record and the natural calendar summaries, then, are records of moveable seasonal feasts that shift not only according to geographical regions but also according to the weather in any particular year. They are a phenological handbook for the region and a time- exposure narrative of the month. In addition, they can be used as an informal base line for monitoring future changes in local climate.The passages from ancient and modern writers that accompany each day's notations are lessons from my readings, as well as from distant seminary and university training, here put to work in service of the reconstruction of my sense of time and space. They are a collection of reminders, hopes and promises for me that I find implicit in the seasons. They are a kind of a cosmological scrapbook for me and the philosophical underpinning of this narrative.

A Daybook for February in Yellow Springs, Ohio

A Memoir in Nature

Author: Bill Felker

Publisher: Daybook for the Year in Yellow

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 184

View: 124

This second volume of A DAYBOOK FOR THE YEAR IN YELLOW SPRINGS, OHIO, is a memoir, extended meditation and guidebook to the month of February in southwestern Ohio, as well as in the Middle Atlantic region and much of the East and Southeast. The DAYBOOK journal itself consists of my notes on what I saw happening around me in Yellow Springs between 1979 and 2017. It is a collection of observations made from the window of my car and from my walks in and around Yellow Springs, in parks and wildlife areas within a few miles of my home and on occasional trips throughout the United States and Europe.My daily, weekly and monthly weather summaries have been distilled from over thirty years of observations, and they offer a statistical description of each day. Although information about the Yellow Springs microclimate at first seemed too narrow to be of use to those who lived outside my area, I found that I could adjust my data to meet the needs of a number of regional and national farm publications for which I started writing in the mid 1980s. Soon I was finding that what had happened in Yellow Springs was applicable to many other parts of the country. In the Natural Calendar sections of the DAYBOOK I note the progress of foliage and floral changes, farm and garden practices, migration times for common birds and peak periods of insect activity. The cumulative format of the DAYBOOK, which brings together all of the annual entries for the same day through the span of over thirty years, has shown me the regularity of the changes in the seasons, and it fleshes out a broad, multi-faceted picture of each segment of the year. The daily record and the natural calendar summaries, then, are records of moveable seasonal feasts that shift not only according to geographical regions but also according to the weather in any particular year. They are a phenological handbook for the region and a time- exposure narrative of the month. In addition, they can be used as an informal base line for monitoring future changes in local climate.The passages from ancient and modern writers that accompany each day's notations are lessons from my readings, as well as from distant seminary and university training, here put to work in service of the reconstruction of my sense of time and space. They are a collection of reminders, hopes and promises for me that I find implicit in the seasons. They are a kind of a cosmological scrapbook for me and the philosophical underpinning of this narrative.

A Daybook for August in Yellow Springs, Ohio

A Memoir in Nature

Author: Bill Felker

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 216

View: 279

This eighth volume of A DAYBOOK FOR THE YEAR IN YELLOW SPRINGS, OHIO, is a memoir, extended meditation and guidebook to the month of August in southwestern Ohio, as well as in the Middle Atlantic region and much of the East and Southeast. The DAYBOOK journal itself consists of my notes on what I saw happening around me in Yellow Springs between 1979 and 2017. It is a collection of observations made from the window of my car and from my walks in and around Yellow Springs, in parks and wildlife areas within a few miles of my home and on occasional trips throughout the United States and Italy. My daily, weekly and monthly weather summaries have been distilled from over thirty years of observations, and they offer a statistical description of each day. Although information about the Yellow Springs microclimate at first seemed too narrow to be of use to those who lived outside my area, I found that I could adjust my data to meet the needs of a number of regional and national farm publications for which I started writing in the mid 1980s. Soon I was finding that what had happened in Yellow Springs was applicable to many other parts of the country. In the Natural Calendar sections of the DAYBOOK I note the progress of foliage and floral changes, farm and garden practices, migration times for common birds and peak periods of insect activity. At the beginning of this volume, I have included a floating calendar that lists average blooming dates for wildflowers that blossom between July and September in an average southwestern Ohio season. Although the flora of the eastern and central United States is hardly limited to the species mentioned here, the flowers listed are common enough to provide easily recognized landmarks for gauging the advance of the year in most areas east of the Mississippi. The cumulative format of the DAYBOOK, which brings together all of the annual entries for the same day through the span of over thirty years, has shown me the regularity of the changes in the seasons, and it fleshes out a broad, multi-faceted picture of each segment of the year. The daily record and the natural calendar summaries, then, are records of moveable seasonal feasts that shift not only according to geographical regions but also according to the weather in any particular year. They are a phenological handbook for the region and a time exposure narrative of the month. In addition, they can be used as an informal base line for monitoring future changes in local climate. The passages from ancient and modern writers that accompany each day's notations are lessons from my readings, as well as from distant seminary and university training, here put to work in service of the reconstruction of my sense of time and space. They are a collection of reminders, hopes and promises for me that I find implicit in the seasons. They are a kind of a cosmological scrapbook for me and the philosophical underpinning of this narrative.

A Daybook for November in Yellow Springs, Ohio

A Memoir in Nature

Author: Bill Felker

Publisher: Daybook for the Year in Yellow

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 204

View: 289

This daybook is a memoir in nature and a handbook for the month of November, being a personal narrative and synthesis of common events in nature between 1981 and 2017 in southwestern Ohio, with a weather history for the region and a variety of natural calendars, reflections by the author and seasonal quotations from ancient and modern writers.

A Daybook for January in Yellow Springs, Ohio

A Memoir in Nature

Author: Bill Felker

Publisher: Independently Published

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 175

View: 985

This first volume of A DAYBOOK FOR THE YEAR IN YELLOW SPRINGS, OHIO, is a memoir, extended meditation and guidebook to the month of February in southwestern Ohio, as well as in the Middle Atlantic region and much of the East and Southeast. The DAYBOOK journal itself consists of my notes on what I saw happening around me in Yellow Springs between 1979 and 2017. It is a collection of observations made from the window of my car and from my walks in and around Yellow Springs, in parks and wildlife areas within a few miles of my home and on occasional trips throughout the United States and Europe.My daily, weekly and monthly weather summaries have been distilled from over thirty years of observations, and they offer a statistical description of each day. Although information about the Yellow Springs microclimate at first seemed too narrow to be of use to those who lived outside my area, I found that I could adjust my data to meet the needs of a number of regional and national farm publications for which I started writing in the mid 1980s. Soon I was finding that what had happened in Yellow Springs was applicable to many other parts of the country. In the Natural Calendar sections of the DAYBOOK I note the progress of foliage and floral changes, farm and garden practices, migration times for common birds and peak periods of insect activity. The cumulative format of the DAYBOOK, which brings together all of the annual entries for the same day through the span of over thirty years, has shown me the regularity of the changes in the seasons, and it fleshes out a broad, multi-faceted picture of each segment of the year. The daily record and the natural calendar summaries, then, are records of moveable seasonal feasts that shift not only according to geographical regions but also according to the weather in any particular year. They are a phenological handbook for the region and a time- exposure narrative of the month. In addition, they can be used as an informal base line for monitoring future changes in local climate.The passages from ancient and modern writers that accompany each day's notations are lessons from my readings, as well as from distant seminary and university training, here put to work in service of the reconstruction of my sense of time and space. They are a collection of reminders, hopes and promises for me that I find implicit in the seasons. They are a kind of a cosmological scrapbook for me and the philosophical underpinning of this narrative. Bill Felker has been writing almanacs for papers and magazines since 1984, and he has published his annual POOR WILL'S ALMANACK since 2003. His radio version of "Poor Will" is broadcast weekly on NPR station WYSO and is available on podcast. His first book of essays, HOME IS THE PRIME MERIDIAN: ESSAYS IN SEARCH OF TIME AND PLACE AND SPIRIT, was published in 2017 and is available on Amazon. A second collection of essays and the entire twelve volumes of A DAYBOOK OF THE YEAR IN YELLOW SPRINGS, OHIO, will be available on Amazon in early 2019.

Yoga Journal

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 120

View: 384

For more than 30 years, Yoga Journal has been helping readers achieve the balance and well-being they seek in their everyday lives. With every issue,Yoga Journal strives to inform and empower readers to make lifestyle choices that are healthy for their bodies and minds. We are dedicated to providing in-depth, thoughtful editorial on topics such as yoga, food, nutrition, fitness, wellness, travel, and fashion and beauty.

Yoga Journal

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 184

View: 965

For more than 30 years, Yoga Journal has been helping readers achieve the balance and well-being they seek in their everyday lives. With every issue,Yoga Journal strives to inform and empower readers to make lifestyle choices that are healthy for their bodies and minds. We are dedicated to providing in-depth, thoughtful editorial on topics such as yoga, food, nutrition, fitness, wellness, travel, and fashion and beauty.

Yoga Journal

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 184

View: 516

For more than 30 years, Yoga Journal has been helping readers achieve the balance and well-being they seek in their everyday lives. With every issue,Yoga Journal strives to inform and empower readers to make lifestyle choices that are healthy for their bodies and minds. We are dedicated to providing in-depth, thoughtful editorial on topics such as yoga, food, nutrition, fitness, wellness, travel, and fashion and beauty.

Legacy of Grace

Musings on the Life and Times of Wheeling Gaunt

Author: Brenda Jean Hubbard

Publisher: AuthorHouse

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 340

View: 103

Legacy of Grace, Musings on the Life and Times of Wheeling Gaunt, by Brenda Jean Hubbard chronicles the true life and times of a formerly enslaved Black man named Wheeling Gaunt who purchased his own freedom and through hard work, diligence and disciplined real estate investment slowly built his fortune. Moving with his wife Amanda to the Village of Yellow Springs, Ohio in 1864, Mr. Gaunt became an important village leader and philanthropist as he continued his real estate investments. Upon his death in 1894 he gifted both family and community with impressive and substantial gifts including a sizable bequest to Wilberforce University. He is perhaps most famous for his creation of The Poor Widows Fund gifting flour and sugar to older women in the village each Christmas, a tradition the village still observes. The land that he gave to the village is known today as Gaunt Park and houses Gaunt Park Pool and adjacent sports fields. Through an exploration of the times in which he lived, Mr. Gaunt’s remarkable story of achievement is investigated. Author Brenda Jean Hubbard was born and raised in Yellow Springs where her family lived for over 50 years. She is donating all money raised in the sale of this book to The Yellow Springs 365 Project, a vital non-profit organization committed to racial justice and education. Hubbard says, “Growing up in Yellow Springs was a true blessing. I was privileged to experience the unique joys and many benefits of knowing diverse, amazing, accomplished and distinguished people from many walks of life. This gifted me with a lifelong passion to celebrate diversity and a heart for social justice. Writing this book is my small attempt to honor the impressive people, history and accomplishments of the Black community while also conveying important and timely history.”